Amridge University Academic Catalog  

2013-2014 Academic Year (Effective 2.28.2014)

 

Table of Contents

Section 15:  School of Continuing Education_ 3

PURPOSE OF THE SCHOOL OF CONTINUING EDUCATION. 4

EDUCATIONAL GOALS OF THE SCHOOL OF CONTINUING EDUCATION. 4

OVERVIEW.. 4

CONTINUING EDUCATION UNIT COURSES AND PROGRAMS. 5

CONTACT INFORMATION. 6

Section 16:  Course Descriptions 7

UNDERGRADUATE LEVEL COURSE DESCRIPTIONS. 8

GRADUATE AND DOCTORAL LEVEL COURSE DESCRIPTIONS. 79

 

 

 

CAMPUS

Montgomery Alabama Campus:

Amridge University

1200 Taylor Road

Montgomery, AL 36117

Telephone Number:  800.351.4040

 

 

 

PAPER AND ELECTRONIC VERSION OF THIS CATALOG PUBLISHED BY:

 

Amridge University

1200 Taylor Road

Montgomery, AL 36117-3520

Telephone Number:  800.351.4040

http://www.AmridgeUniversity.edu


Section 15:  School of Continuing Education

This section includes important information on the programs and courses offered through the Amridge University School of Continuing Education.  Exceptions may be noted in the respective sections for specific programs and services specified elsewhere in this publication, noted in later editions of this publication, and/or published addenda (paper- and web-based) [Version 2.2012-2013, Effective 2.24.2013].

 


PURPOSE OF THE SCHOOL OF CONTINUING EDUCATION

The purpose of the School of Continuing Education is to provide participating students with quality and timely continuing education experiences for professional development and life enrichment purposes.  These programs will be developed and presented by faculty and specialists related to programs and offerings provided by Amridge University as well as by professionals and other individuals in areas of interest to the Amridge University community and communities served.

 

EDUCATIONAL GOALS OF THE SCHOOL OF CONTINUING EDUCATION

The Amridge University School of Continuing Education provides programs and services through three educational goals.  These goals are as follows:

1.    Each student will have the opportunity to acquire the knowledge and skills in accordance with the learning objectives specified in the syllabus of the respective continuing education course;

2.    The University will strive to provide continuing education programs and services related to Amridge University program offerings and designed to meet the education and training needs of participants in terms of professional development and/or certification, licensure, and licensure renewal; and

3.    The University will strive to provide continuing education programs and services in accordance with the interests of the Amridge University community and communities severed by Amridge University.

 

OVERVIEW

Amridge University is committed not only to providing quality degree and professional degree programs to students but is also committed to providing quality professional development courses and programs.  In most instances these professional development programs will be offered through the Amridge University School of Continuing Education and cover a full spectrum of disciplines from professional development programs and activities designed for ministers and church leaders to marriage and family therapists to professional counselors, just to name a few.

CONTINUING EDUCATION UNIT COURSES AND PROGRAMS

Amridge University offers continuing education courses that are designed to meet the training needs of selected professionals and workforce development.  All of the courses under this cluster provide program completers with a certificate of completion and continuing education units (CEUs).  The CEU is the internationally recognized unit of educational measurement for training and professional development related programs.  Furthermore, in the interest of helping to ensure that all Amridge University programs offering CEUs, the University has adopted and is committed to following the Criteria and Guidelines for Quality Continuing Education and Training Programs:  The CEU and Other Measurement Units (Criteria) as published by the International Association for Continuing Education and Training (IACET) as well as the related criteria required by the University’s accrediting organizations.

Through this commitment to quality programming, Amridge University adheres to the 10 criteria put forth by IACET.  Specifically, these criteria are as follows:

Criterion 1 – The provider must have an identifiable continuing education and training unit or group with assigned responsibility for administering continuing education training (CEU activities, courses, or programs).

Criterion 2 – The provider, through its continuing education or training CE/T unit, has a review process that ensures that the CEU criteria are met.

Criterion 3 – The provider has a system in place to identify learners who meet requirements for satisfactory completion and maintains a complete, permanent (at least seven years) record of each learner’s participation and can provide a copy of that record upon request.

Criterion 4 – A learning environment and support services, appropriate to the continuing education or training goals and learning outcomes, are provided.

Criterion 5 – Each activity, course, or program is planned in response to identified needs of the target audiences.

Criterion 6 – The provider has clear and concise written statements of intended learning outcomes (e.g., participant behavioral or performance objectives) based on identified needs for each continuing education and training activity, course, or program.

Criterion 7 – Qualified personnel are involved in planning and conducting each activity, course, or program.

Criterion 8 – Content and instructional methods are appropriate for the learning outcomes of each activity, course, or program and provide opportunities for learners to participate and receive feedback.

Criterion 9 – Processes or procedures established during an activity, course, or program planning are used to assess achievement of learning outcomes.

Criterion 10 – Each learning activity, course, or program is evaluated.[i]

 

CONTACT INFORMATION

Also, individuals wanting more information, desiring to make suggestions for continuing education courses, or interested in teaching continuing education courses may contact the Amridge University School of Continuing Education at the address below:

 

Amridge University School of Continuing Education

1200 Taylor Road

Montgomery, AL 36117-3520

Toll free telephone number:  800.351.4040, extension 7526

Email address:  continuinged@amridgeuniversity.edu


Section 16:  Course Descriptions

This section includes a specification of course descriptions for all courses offered on a for credit basis at Amridge University.  Exceptions may be noted in the respective sections for specific programs and services specified elsewhere in this publication, noted in later editions of this publication, and/or published addenda (paper- and web-based) [Version 2.2012-2013, Effective 2.24.2013].

 


UNDERGRADUATE LEVEL COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

 

AR – ART

AR 1405 – Photography (4 Semester Hours)

An introductory course in photography which approaches the medium as an art form and unique means of human communication, as well as a technical skill. The student is introduced to basic mechanical principles of the camera, is shown how photography influences human perception and communication, and is taught guidelines and techniques for selecting the content and structure of photographs. Students are given specific photographic assignments throughout the course.

AR 1409 – Art Appreciation (4 Semester Hours)

An introduction to great works of art from all over the world, as well as an observer’s introduction to the artistic process of critical thinking and problem solving. Perceptual skills will be enhanced to encourage insight and understanding of the visual experience.

AR 1415 – Art History (4 Semester Hours)

A survey of visual arts of the west.

 

 

BS – BUSINESS

BS 1401 – Introduction to Business (4 Semester Hours)

A comprehensive view of the contemporary business environment that delves into the complex functions of a business, exposing students to the detailed internal and external operations affecting both large and small businesses. The course encompasses five general areas: foundation and forms of American business; organization and management of a business; the internal workings of a business; the environment of a business; and the challenges of business. Many of the principles and methods included can be applied to the administration of the local church. A research paper is required.

BS 1403 – Business Math (4 Semester Hours)

An innovative business mathematics course that focuses on the math that students encounter in their professional and personal lives. The content begins with mathematical foundations and basic business concepts, then moves on to mathematics of retailing, mathematics of finance, business accounting concepts, and communication with numbers.

BS 1405 – Computers in Business (4 Semester Hours)

This foundations course provides skills training and assessment for a broad range of computing concepts and techniques, including competency in computer hardware and software, operating systems, word processing and spreadsheet functions, networks and the Internet, electronic mail, and an understanding of the impact of computing and the Internet in society.

BS 1406 – Accounting Principles I (4 Semester Hours)

An introduction to analysis and recording of business transactions; accounting for sales, purchases, cash disbursements, and receivables; includes end-of-fiscal period work, adjustments, financial statements, and closing procedures. Prerequisite: CO 1405.

BS 1410 – Contemporary Issues in American Business (4 Semester Hours)

Students in the course will study management techniques and their application to issues of the workplace. Organizations and management evolve to meet social and technical changes. Organizations and managers face various issues today and must be able to adjust continually. This course will explore the issues that affect how organizations and managers adapt. A research paper is required. Prerequisite: CO 1405.

BS 2400 – e-Commerce (4 Semester Hours)

This course introduces the model for conducting business-to-business and business-to-consumer electronic transactions. Major topics include the Basis of the Internet, Entrepreneurship, Creation of a Business Plan, Financing, Web Site Design, and e-Business management. An e-business plan is required.

BS 2405 – Principles of Organizational Behavior (4 Semester Hours)

This course emphasizes the fundamental concepts of organizational behavior. Emphasizes the human problems and behavior in organizations and methods of dealing with these problems. Focuses on motivation, informal groups, power and politics, communication, ethics, conflict resolution, employment laws, technology and people, and managing change.

BS 2406 – Accounting Principles II (4 Semester Hours)

This course is a continuation of BS 1406 addressing accounting concepts, assumptions, and principles. This course progresses to evaluation of accounting data for merchandise inventory, deferrals and accruals, plant assets, intangibles, payables, and payroll. Introduces accounting for corporations as related to stocks, bonds, and corporate earnings. Introduces partnership accounting and, in addition, introduces the statement of cash flows. Prerequisite: BS 1406.

BS 2408 – Management: Theory, Practices and Application (4 Semester Hours)

This course explores the field of management in theory and practice and as both a science and an art. The course also addresses the role of managers in the current world of rapid change, increased competitive forces, and increased expectations for the successful performance of employees and organizations. The focus is on ways and means of achieving desired goals. The student will leave this course with a solid background in the nature and work of management and managers.

BS 2410 – Business Policy (4 Semester Hours)

Provides opportunities for students to integrate management principles, techniques, and theories by applying previously acquired knowledge of accounting, law, personnel, economics, and statistics. Utilizes cases from the federal government and private industry with emphasis on problem identification, analysis, business, and decision-making within the organization.

BS 2412 – Financial Management (4 Semester Hours)

This course teaches the concepts and skills of financial planning within a business. The student will be learning how to use financial statements and how to plan appropriate action. The student will prepare budgets, analyze investment options, and determine the best means of financial business endeavors. The student will also discover ways of assessing both the return and the risk involved in business finance decisions. A research paper is required.

BS 2418 – Marketing: Principles and Practices (4 Semester Hours)

This course involves the role of marketing within the total organization. The major areas of study include: the consumer and industrial markets, research techniques, product decisions, and customer motivation. A research paper is required.

BS 2420 – Principles of Marketing (4 Semester Hours)

An introduction to the fundamentals of marketing that cover product development, distribution, promotion, and pricing, with emphasis on developing a managerial point of view in planning and evaluating marketing decisions. Addresses key marketing concepts such as consumer decision making, market segmentation, and development strategies and their significance in domestic and international activities.

BS 2430 – Principles of Finance (4 Semester Hours)

Study of the finance function of the firm. Topics include financial statement analysis, ratios, cash budgeting, cost of capital and capital budgeting, debt and equity, capital structures, types and evaluation of securities, and overview of securities markets. Also addresses the effects of multinational operations, multiple currencies, international tax laws, money and capital markets, and political risk environments.

BS 3400 – Leadership and Organizational Dynamics (4 Semester Hours)

Human beings are social by nature and, as a result, spend much of their time in groups. On a large scale, group theory can be applied to the scope of organizations, where individuals join together to form a complex organizational structure. This course blends current and traditional management topics and organizes them around the functional or process approach to the study of management. The course addresses the fundamentals of management by focusing on the manager, international management, information technology, ethics and social responsibility, planning and decision making, organizing, leading, and controlling. A research paper is required.

BS 3401 – Principles of Management (4 Semester Hours)

A survey of the functions of modern management, planning, leading, organizing, and controlling. Contemporary management highlights the functions, inter-relations, and context of what managers do every day.

BS 3405 – Business Statistics (4 Semester Hours)

This course introduces the concepts of statistics and their applications to business decisions. Topics include hypothesis testing, elements of probability, descriptive statistics, random samples, and point and interval estimation. Emphasis is on collection and analysis of data needed to evaluate reported results of statistical studies and to make sound business decisions in accounting, finance, marketing, management, and economics.

BS 3406 – Financial Accounting (4 Semester Hours)

This course covers the fundamentals of financial accounting. Topics include measurement, identification, and the reporting of financial events on a business. Financial information is examined from the perspective of effective management decision-making with emphasis on planning and controlling. Prerequisite: BS 2406.

BS 3415 – Basic Accounting Principles (4 Semester Hours)

This course focuses on accounting concepts, principles, and terminology. Emphasis is on the accounting cycle and equation as they relate to different types of business ownership. Upon completion, the student should be able to demonstrate accounting procedures used in a proprietorship, partnership, and corporation.

BS 3420 – Accounting for the Non-Accountant (4 Semester Hours)

A review of accounting principles from a manager’s position with an emphasis on the effect of transactions on a financial statement, how to interpret the financial statement, how to make objective accounting decisions that will assist a manager in making satisfactory business and economic decisions.

BS 3425 – Introduction to Accounting (4 Semester Hours)

An introductory course for persons interested in learning accounting principles.

BS 3427 – Introduction to Managerial Accounting (4 Semester Hours)

This course is a continuation of BS 3415. This course prepares students to understand the internal accounting procedures of how costs flow through the system. Although emphasis is on a manufacturing environment, the information learned can be applied to all types of businesses including governmental and non-profit organizations. Prerequisites: BS 3415 and BS 3420.

BS 3430 – Business Law (4 Semester Hours)

An overview of business law and the world of business as it relates to contracts and the legal system. Topics treated include the law of sales, commercial paper, agency, property, legal government regulations and environmental topics, employment practices, reorganization and liquidation under the bankruptcy laws, and consumer and environment protection.

BS 3434 – Current Issues in International Business (4 Semester Hours)

This course is designed for non-business majors. This course will examine current trends in the for-profit and non-profit global business environment and issues facing international companies of various regions around the world. While providing an excellent foundational awareness for business majors this course presents a broad overview of international business issues and trends, is non-technical in nature, and therefore especially beneficial for the non-business major. A research paper is required.

BS 3440 – Economic Environment of Organizations (4 Semester Hours)

Economics is not only an academic discipline with its own body of theoretical insights and empirical data, but it is also a way of thinking. Introduces economic approaches to thinking and managerial decision-making, specifically focusing on the challenges of aggressive international competition and fast paced technological innovation. In addition, students are challenged to reflect on how economic thinking illuminates specific social problems facing the United States and the world.

BS 3442 – Effective Decision-Making Strategies (4 Semester Hours)

This course equips students with concrete skills in critical thinking and decision making that will allow them to identify and solve organizational problems, as well as provide strategic direction. Emphasis is placed on preparing students to deal clearly, rationally, and creatively with a diverse workforce and dynamic workplace. A research paper is required.

BS 3450 – Business Policy and Strategy (4 Semester Hours)

This course focuses on the formal decision making process called “strategic management.” The primary course objective is to acquaint student with the process of developing a business strategy and how to implement that strategy. Case studies are an integral part of the course. A research paper is required.

BS 4144 – Special Topics in Business (1 Semester Hour)

The content of this course will vary by semester and will be designed to allow for instruction in special content areas outside the courses being offered within a Business Administration concentration. This course will have a business emphasis chosen by a Business Administration faculty member on the basis of student/program demand, compatibility with the general nature of the Business concentration and related courses, and instructor interest/competence. This course will be offered periodically to meet student special interests in the field and will be designed to cover specialized topics not usually presented in depth in regular courses already listed in the Catalog. The course may be repeated for credit as long as the topic presented is substantially different than a previously taken special topics class but no more than 4 credits may be accumulated. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor (POI).

BS 4244 – Special Topics in Business (2 Semester Hours)

The content of this course will vary by semester and will be designed to allow for instruction in special content areas outside the courses being offered within a Business Administration concentration. This course will have a business emphasis chosen by a Business Administration faculty member on the basis of student/program demand, compatibility with the general nature of the Business concentration and related courses, and instructor interest/competence. This course will be offered periodically to meet student special interests in the field and will be designed to cover specialized topics not usually presented in depth in regular courses already listed in the Catalog. The course may be repeated for credit as long as the topic presented is substantially different than a previously taken special topics class but no more than 4 credits may be accumulated. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor (POI).

BS 4344 – Special Topics in Business (3 Semester Hours)

The content of this course will vary by semester and will be designed to allow for instruction in special content areas outside the courses being offered within a Business Administration concentration. This course will have a business emphasis chosen by a Business Administration faculty member on the basis of student/program demand, compatibility with the general nature of the Business concentration and related courses, and instructor interest/competence. This course will be offered periodically to meet student special interests in the field and will be designed to cover specialized topics not usually presented in depth in regular courses already listed in the Catalog. The course may be repeated for credit as long as the topic presented is substantially different than a previously taken special topics class but no more than 4 credits may be accumulated. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor (POI).

BS 4406 – Managerial Accounting (4 Semester Hours)

This course looks at how users of financial information interpret accounting reports when making business decisions. Emphasis is on profitability concepts and performance evaluation. A research paper is required. Prerequisite: BS 3406

BS 4420 – Wireless Technologies in Business Applications (4 Semester Hours)

An in-depth course in the technology of wireless communications and their respective business applications. Specific content includes treatment of fundamentals to advanced concepts, hands-on projects of various levels of difficulty, and the design of business operations utilizing wireless technologies. This course will require a minimum of one design project. Prerequisite: CO 3424.

BS 4435 – International Business Environment (4 Semester Hours)

This course is designed for business majors. The course will examine the political, economic, and cultural environment including the topics of international trade and global financial markets, investments, and exchange rates. This course will also cover global corporate strategy and organizational structure and how firms carry out their production, supply chain, human resource, marketing and financial management activities. The impact of regionally diverse cultural and ethical issues on these management activities will be covered as well. A research paper is required.

BS 4444 – Special Topics in General Business (4 Semester Hours)

The content of this course will vary by semester and will be designed to allow for instruction in special content areas outside the courses being offered within a Business Administration concentration. This course will have a business emphasis chosen by a Business Administration faculty member on the basis of student/program demand, compatibility with the general nature of the Business concentration and related courses, and instructor interest/competence. This course will be offered periodically to meet student special interests in the field and will be designed to cover specialized topics not usually presented in depth in regular courses already listed in the Catalog. The course may be repeated for credit as long as the topic presented is substantially different than a previously taken special topics class but no more than 4 credits may be accumulated. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor (POI).

BS 4445 – Project Management (4 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of total project management. The student will prepare to plan, design, staff, allocate resources, develop project time line and lead personnel in project development and implementation.

BS 4446 – Technology Enhanced Business Marketing (4 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of the use of technology that can be utilized to help business marketing. Through this course, the student will learn about technology-related advertising and marketing, online and offline market research, data collection, domain names, advertising options, email marketing, search engines, web site monitoring, and incentives. A research paper is required.

BS 4448 – Human Resource Management Effectiveness (4 Semester Hours)

Human resource management is the study of managing a workforce to perform at optimum capacity. The Human Resource Management Effectiveness course focuses on the positive effects that an effective human resource management strategy may have on organizational culture, job satisfaction, recruitment and retention, and organizational performance. Students will select an organization and complete a Human Resource Management Audit of existing HR management practices and extrapolate the effects of alternate HR management practices on the organization and its performance in the marketplace.

BS 4450 – Organizational Communication (4 Semester Hours)

This course demonstrates how essential communication is in conjunction with the practices that each organization, both for profit and not-for-profit, can employ to become more efficient and effective in everyday activities. While strengthening reading, writing, and presentation skills, topics presented include basic communication principles, interpersonal communication with in the organizational structure, literacy and employee communication, current and controversial issues including ethical issues, crisis communication management, and the effects of emerging communication technologies. A research paper is required.

BS 4456 – Directed Field Experience in Area of Concentration (4 Semester Hours)

Supervised occupational work experience (minimum of 300 hours, paid or un-paid) in an approved concentration-related occupation, accompanied by ongoing discussions via distance learning. Portfolio reflecting internship experiences required. A research paper is required. Prerequisite: Senior class standing and departmental approval.

BS 4458 – e-Portfolio in Business Administration (4 Semester Hours)

Note: This is a capstone course that should be taken at the end of the Business program. The program exit exam in the area of the student’s concentration (General Business, Information Communication or Information Systems Management) will be administered as part of this course. This course will assist the student in the development of a professional e-Portfolio that is reflective of the student’s professional goals, objectives, and personal experiences and that is designed as a valuable tool for career progression. This course will include weekly discussions about professional and ethical issues/topics related to the student’s discipline as well as techniques for e-Portfolio development. Prerequisite: Must be within 12 hours of graduation.

BS 4460 – Marketing Environment of Organizations (4 Semester Hours)

As an art and a science, marketing is undergoing dramatic and exciting changes while it remains one of the most critical functions in today’s national and international business climate. Covers basic marketing theory and terminology as applied to domestic and international marketing opportunities and problems. Identify and evaluate marketing data and based on that data develop workable programs to solve problems and capitalize on opportunities.

BS 4462 – Starting a Non-Profit Business (4 Semester Hours)

Topics include the legal definition of a non-profit entity, how to organize a non-profit business, frequently-asked questions, IRS 990 issues, how a well-functioning board operates within a non-profit organization, CEO role, fund raising, capital campaigns, and grant writing. A research paper is required.

BS 4463 – Family Business Management (4 Semester Hours)

This course explores the challenges and opportunities facing individual and families involved in business relationships. Topics addressed include family-business culture, entrepreneurial influences, key issues and conflicts, career planning, succession and strategic planning, counseling and consulting, professional support relationships and survival skills in the family business.

BS 4465 – Ethical Character of Business Leadership (4 Semester Hours)

This course is intended to provide students with an essential understanding of the ethical issues facing those in the business world. Students will be expected to develop and strengthen their ability to understand and critically analyze ethical issues, dilemmas, and problems confronted by employees, managers, and business owners, so that they might better provide ethical leadership in the business setting. Concepts addressed include research of current trends in business as it relates to ethical actions on the part of consumers, employees, and leaders; damages caused by unethical conduct; company values versus personal values; competition for customers and employees; politics and bureaucracy; the role of professional organizations in providing codes of ethical behavior; workplace monitoring, jurisdiction, and systems of trust as they apply to general business and information technology.

BS 4466 – Directed Field Experience (Internship) (4 Semester Hours)

Supervised occupational work experience (minimum of 150 hours, paid or un-paid) in an approved concentration-related occupation, accompanied by ongoing discussions via distance learning. Portfolio and/or journals reflecting internship experiences required. A research paper required. Prerequisite: BS 4456.

 

 

BY – BIOLOGY

BY 2401 – Principles of Biology I (4 Semester Hours)

Fundamental concepts of Biology. Cell structure, chemical background, and introduction to genetics.

BY 2402 – Principles of Biology II (4 Semester Hours)

A continuation of BY 2401 further exploring the fundamental concepts of Biology. Cell structure, chemical background, and introduction to genetics.

 

 

CO – COMPUTER SCIENCE

CO 1401 – Introduction to Computers (4 Semester Hours)

A survey of electronic data processing, computer hardware and software systems, and developments that will provide the basis for further advancements in information processing. The course provides a comprehensive overview of the computer: what it is, what it can and cannot do, how it operates, and how it may be instructed to solve problems. It introduces learners to the terminology of data processing, examines the application of the computer to a broad range of organizational settings and social environments, and prepares students to understand and utilize computers in both their personal and their professional lives.

CO 1402 – Computers in Business (4 Semester Hours)

A survey and analysis of the use of management information systems in the business environment. Modules cover such topics as computer basics, word processing, electronic publishing, graphics, spreadsheets, database management, accounting, project management, telecommunications, and artificial intelligence. A Lab Pack is used in this course and describes and compares the features of a range of software packages and allows students the opportunity to use and evaluate them in action.

CO 1403 – Management Information Systems in Business (4 Semester Hours)

A survey and analysis of the use of management information systems in the business environment. Modules cover the basic concepts and terminology of business data processing including computer systems and components, spreadsheets, database management, accounting, Internet applications, and project management.

CO 1405 – Microcomputer Applications (4 Semester Hours)

An introduction to the most common software applications for microcomputers. The specific software covered is Windows XP Professional with the 2002 edition of Word, Access, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook. The course also addresses the basic operations of the microcomputer.

CO 1406 – Introduction to Windows XP (4 Semester Hours)

An introduction to the basics of Microsoft Windows and graphical environments. The course addresses normal business uses of microcomputers and windows applications. Students should have basic microcomputer skills prior to enrolling in this course.

CO 1407 – Introduction to Windows Vista (4 Semester Hours)

An introduction to the basics of Microsoft Windows and Vista’s graphical environments. The course addresses normal business uses of microcomputers and windows applications. Students should have basic microcomputer skills prior to enrolling in this course.

CO 1408 – Introduction to Windows 7 (4 Semester Hours)

An introduction to the basics of Microsoft Windows 7. The course addresses normal business uses of microcomputers and windows applications. Students should have basic microcomputer skills prior to enrolling in this course.

CO 1416 – Operating Systems (4 Semester Hours)

This comprehensive survey course covers leading operating systems. Covering 10 different desktop and server operating systems from both an end-user and administrative standpoint, allowing for a comprehensive full-course solution, this course also introduces the student to operating systems used for hand-held devises, pocket PCs, and mobile phones. Upon completion, the student should be able to converse intelligently on topics such as configuring an operating system on the network, managing users and groups, and securing a network against unauthorized use. Application labs will utilize the command prompt (DOS), Microsoft Windows XP, and Linux.

CO 1421 – Advanced Word Processing (4 Semester Hours)

This course is designed to increase student proficiency in using advanced word processing functions. Emphasis is on the use of industry-standard software to maximize productivity. Upon completion, the student should be able to demonstrate the ability to generate complex documents such as forms, newsletters, and multi-page documents.

CO 1423 – Business Correspondence (4 Semester Hours)

Communications is a vital tool of the business leader. Therefore, this course will prepare business leaders to create various types of technical and other correspondence for use in business decisions and applications specific to General Business, Information Communication, and/or Information Systems Management. Included in this course is a series of case-studies and simulated situations which develop and enhance the correspondence skills and leadership thought processes of future for profit and not-for-profit business leaders. Writing projects are required. Prerequisites: EH 1402 and CO 1405.

CO 1427 – Legal Terminology (4 Semester Hours)

This course is designed to familiarize the student with common legal terms. Emphasis is on the word root building system combining Greek and Latin prefixes, suffixes, word roots, and forms that make medical terms easy to use. Upon completion, the student should be able to understand and use legal terminology.

CO 1475 – Desktop Publishing (4 Semester Hours)

This course introduces students to page design, layout and typography. Emphasis is on the use of current commercial desktop publishing software, graphic tools, and electronic input/output devices to design and print high-quality publications such as newsletters, brochures, catalogs, forms, and flyers. Upon completion, the student should be able to utilize proper layout and design concepts.

CO 1477 – Office Graphics and Presentations (4 Semester Hours)

This course focuses on producing business slides and presentations. Emphasis is on software tools, presentation options, design and presentation considerations. Upon completion, the student should be able to design and produce a business presentation.

CO 2405 – Database Programming (Microsoft Access) (4 Semester Hours)

This course provides a study of database programming using microcomputer database management systems (DBMS) software packages. Topics include: design and development of business data-systems, structured programming techniques, data editing, and output design. This course is a core component for becoming a Database Developer.

CO 2410 – Database Management (4 Semester Hours)

Database Management will involve the understanding, application, and design of database management projects to fulfill business applications. This course will include interactive database team projects and management design of database requirements. The final project will be the analysis, design, and creation of a real-world database project which will require the business leader to use leadership skills to accomplish the project. A research paper is required. Prerequisite: CO 1405.

CO 2411 – Internet Applications (4 Semester Hours)

Introduces the student to the Internet and provides the student with an excellent opportunity to understand, investigate, and explore the Internet as it is interconnected to Wide Area Networks (The Internet “cloud”). The student will learn how to connect a PC to the Internet and how to use communications software to access the many resources available on the network. Subjects include: network fundamentals, Internet concepts, electronic mail, file transfer protocol (FTP), Telnet, Internet gophers, and information services.

CO 2412 – Creating a Business Presence on the Web (4 Semester Hours)

This course uses the application language of HTML and XHTML. In this course, students will program multimedia Web pages with hypertext links, tables, frames, forms, cascading style sheets utilizing HTML and XHTML. JavaScript is introduced. HTML, XHTML, and JavaScript are used to design and control dynamic content and layout, control mouse and keyboard events, utilize sound, and manipulate graphics. All work is uploaded and accessible via the Internet. A research paper is required.

CO 2413 – HTML Programming (4 Semester Hours)

HTML Programming is a course that uses the application language of HTML and DHTML. In this course, students will create multimedia Web pages with hypertext links, tables, frames, forms, cascading style sheets, program in Java Script, work with dynamic content and layout, control mouse and keyboard events, and create new frames and windows.

CO 2415 – Fundamentals of Web Design (4 Semester Hours)

In this course students learn to design and create Web pages. The course includes coverage of web editing software i.e., FrontPage, GoLive, etc. Students will demonstrate a mastery of design principles in creating web pages.

CO 2416 – Technology Enhanced Communications I (4 Semester Hours)

This course is designed to provide the student with basic word processing skills. Emphasis is on using software features to create, edit, and print common office communications. Upon completion, the student should be able to demonstrate the ability to use industry-standard software to generate appropriately formatted, accurate, and attractive business communications such as memos, letters, and reports.

CO 2417 – Database-Driven Websites (4 Semester Hours)

Database-Driven Websites is intended for the individual who wants to create dynamic Web pages that interact with a database. A review of Visual Basic programming concepts is provided, but users should have previously taken an introductory Visual Basic programming course. Background chapters are provided on using the Access Database environment, creating SQL queries, and using HTML at the code level.

CO 2418 – Technology Enhanced Communications II (4 Semester Hours)

This is a continuation of the skills and concepts learned in Technology Enhanced Communication I. This course is designed to increase and strengthen student proficiency in using advanced word processing functions as a form of communication in business and society. Emphasis is on the use of industry-standard software to maximize productivity. Upon completion, the student should be able to demonstrate the ability to generate complex document such as forms, newsletters, and multi-page items including sections, tables, indexes, and tables of contents. Prerequisite: CO 2416.

CO 2419 – Active Server Pages (4 Semester Hours)

This course is intended for the student who wants to learn to create active server pages that solve everyday business problems. While an introduction to Web applications and Web servers is reviewed, it is assumed that the student has a solid understanding of these elements. In addition, the student is assumed to have a working knowledge of variables, constants, arrays, collections, database management systems, HTML, and query languages, even though these items are discussed and addressed in this course. The student should be able to manipulate the Windows operating system, use the Internet Explorer to view Web pages, and understand how to create simple web pages.

CO 2420 – Business Presentations and Publishing (4 Semester Hours)

This course introduces students both to publishing and presentation concepts. Using current commercial desktop publishing software, graphic tools, and electronic input/output devices students learn to design and print high-quality publications such as newsletters, brochures, catalogs, forms, and flyers. Using industry standard presentation software the students will explore presentation creation options, design, and presentation considerations. Upon completion, the student should be able to utilize proper layout and design concepts used in publishing and be able to design and produce a business presentation.


CO 2421 – Internet Programming with VBScript/JavaScript I (4 Semester Hours)

Internet Programming with VBScript and JavaScript is intended for the individual who wants to create dynamic Web applications. You should be familiar with the Windows operating system and know how to use Internet Explorer to view the Web pages. Additionally, this course uses the JavaScript programming language to develop actual Web applications. Syntax, object-oriented procedures, and documentation are emphasized.

CO 2422 – Communicating via the Internet (4 Semester Hours)

Introduces the student to the Internet and provides the student with an excellent opportunity to understand, investigate, and explore the Internet as it is interconnected to Wide Area Networks. The student will learn how to use communications software to access the many resources available on the network. Subjects include: network fundamentals, Internet concepts, electronic mail, file transfer protocol (FTP), Telnet, Internet gophers, firewalls, security issues, and information services. Research papers and an Internet accessible blog are required.

CO 2423 – Enterprise Network Design (4 Semester Hours)

This course is the MCSE course for Exam # 70-217: Implementing and Administering a Microsoft Windows 2000 Directory Services Infrastructure. The focus of this course is the Active Directory and how the A.D. is installed, configured, and used to support a network of small to large numbers of hosts/users.

CO 2425 – Java Programming (4 Semester Hours)

This course is an exciting study of the JAVA 2 Programming Language with it object-oriented base system. Students will learn to design, test, modify, troubleshoot, compile, debug, etc. JAVA 2 is a Sponsored Curriculum course in the Cisco Academy and is the Sun Java Software. Projects and extensive hands-on activities make this course an invaluable programming tool for building true-to-life business, web-based solutions.

CO 2427 – Visual Basic (4 Semester Hours)

This course is an introduction to the programming language Visual BASIC. Emphasis is on object-oriented languages and the basic fundamentals of programming in a graphical environment. This course requires outside laboratory time, and students are required to demonstrate a mastery of concepts presented.

CO 2431 – CISCO I: Networking Essentials (4 Semester Hours)

This course is the required Networking Fundamental course for networking students. This course covers the basic concepts and lab exercises to prepare students for acquiring networking skills required for all other networking and DPT courses. Included in this course are networking hardware, OSI Model, topologies, IP Addressing, subnet applications, and design. (Ref: CCNA Exam 640-607)

CO 2432 – CISCO II: Router Theory (4 Semester Hours)

This course is designed to prepare a student to apply and understand the basics of networking hardware. The course covers the beginning router configurations; router and routing protocols; and an introduction to LAN switching. This is the second of a four-part series designed to prepare students for the CISCO Certified Networking Associate (CCNA) Exam, 640-607.

CO 2433 – CISCO III: Advanced Router Theory (4 Semester Hours)

This course is designed to prepare a student to apply and understand the advanced principles and applications of networking hardware. The course covers advanced router configurations; LAN switching; network management; and advanced network design. This is the third of a four-part series designed to prepare students for the CISCO Certified Networking Associate (CCNA) Exam, 640-607.

CO 2434 – CISCO IV: Project-Based Learning (4 Semester Hours)

This course is designed to prepare a student to apply and understand the advanced principles, application, and implementation of networking hardware. The course covers the advanced network design projects and advanced network management projects. This is the fourth of a four-part series designed to prepare students for CISCO Certified Networking Associate (CCNA) Exam, 640-607.

CO 2441 – Designing Microsoft Windows 2000 Directory Services (4 Semester Hours)

This course is the preparatory course for MCSE Exam # 70-219: Designing a Microsoft Windows 2000 Directory Services Infrastructure. This course will delve deeply down through the Analysis and Design of Directory Services to build a functionally, efficient network of various complexities. Team building is a must in this course and ample time is given to outside work.

CO 2443 – Designing Microsoft Windows 2000 Network Infrastructure (4 Semester Hours)

This course is the prep course for MCSE Exam # 70-221: Designing a Microsoft Windows 2000 Network Infrastructure. This course will delve deeply down through the Analysis and Design of Network Infrastructure to build a functionally, efficient network of various complexities. Team building is a must in this course and ample time is given to outside work.

CO 2446 – Open Source Business Systems I (4 Semester Hours)

This course is a review of the open source applications and systems available to support organizational systems in business, education, and SOHO (Small-Office, Home-Office). Several system functions will be discussed and demonstrated using "capture technology" (e.g. Camtasia Studio). An "entry-level" technical research paper is required in this course.

CO 2447 – Open Source Business Systems II (4 Semester Hours)

This course is an in-depth study of the types of open-source systems in actual use in business, education, and other areas. Students will be required to design an original survey instrument, submit an IRB application for their study, and conduct the investigation by surveying a relative sample of businesses to obtain data on the number/types of open source systems in actual use at respective organizations. Your instructor will provide substantial logistical support for this technical research project. Prerequisite: CO 2446.

CO 3412 – Business Communication through Data (4 Semester Hours)

This course expands the student’s ability to communicate in business using database and spreadsheet concepts. Using a case-based approach and current commercial software, the course combines business data-gathering strategies with hands-on creation of spreadsheets and databases. Upon completion, the student should be able to create, design, manipulate, format, and graph effective spreadsheet and database files.

CO 3419 – Accessing Information from Libraries and the Internet (4 Semester Hours)

An introduction to methods and skills appropriate to accessing information from library collections and from Internet sources.

CO 3420 – Managing Business Projects via Technology (4 Semester Hours)

This course introduces the student to the concepts of project management. Using industry standard project management software, students will plan a project, create a project schedule, manage critical tasks and milestones, communicate project information, assign resources, and manage costs, track progress, and share information with others. Students will be introduced to collaborative projects and project management certification information. A research paper is required.

CO 3421 – Principles of Training and Development in IT (4 Semester Hours)

This course will enable a prospective business leader who manages Information Systems personnel to become the change-agent in the enhancement of skills-building. The course will teach the business leader how to manage the training and development of IT staff so that these skills may increase the business advantage within the organization. A research paper is required.

CO 3424 – Networking Systems and Data Communications I (4 Semester Hours)

This course provides a complete introduction to data communications geared towards the business-oriented perspective of the technology that lies at the heart of the booming telecommunications revolution. Providing a solid background of fundamentals to tomorrow's business and information systems professionals, this survey of data communications provides a solid understanding not only of how things work, but how they can be applied to create business solutions. New technologies covered include wireless technology, security, and the Ethernet. Topics include Fundamentals of Data and Signals, Conducted and Wireless Media, Multiplexing, Error Detection and Control, Telecommunications Systems, Network Security, and Network Design/Management. Projects are included in this course.

CO 3425 – Networking Systems and Data Communications II (4 Semester Hours)

This course is a continuation of CO 3424 and includes the advanced topics begun in Networking Systems and Data Communications I. Advanced projects are included in this course. Prerequisite: CO 3424.

CO 3426 – Security Measures in Business (4 Semester Hours)

This is an in-depth course intended to introduce the business leader to the challenges of security in organizations. Included in this course are the technologies used in security procedures and methods to protect the business data and environment. Also, this course will deal with some specific technologies as a way to prepare leaders to manage others who are responsible for the technical aspects of delivering security within organizations.

CO 3428 – Introduction to Information Security (Cyber Security) (4 Semester Hours)

This course will present an overview of the threats to your information structure and intellectual property with an emphasis on the detection and prevention of intrusions or theft. The protection of services such as the World Wide Web, file sharing and email will be analyzed. The vulnerabilities and hardening of major operating systems such as Linux and Microsoft’s Windows 2000 will be discussed. The course takes a holistic approach – discussing the technical but focusing on the need for proper training and procedures in the maintenance of an effective yet secure information technology infrastructure. While the material of the course is technical in nature, no systems administration or software development experience is assumed. A good familiarity with the use of the Internet and computers is required and some knowledge of TCP/IP would be helpful.

CO 3430 – Web Design and Applications Management I (4 Semester Hours)

This course expands on HTML, XHTML, and XML concepts. Students design and create web sites with multiple non-linear pages using industry standard web design applications. Web site management strategies and security issues are also covered. Prerequisites: CO 2412 and CO 3424 preferred but not required.

CO 3431 – Web Design and Applications Management II (4 Semester Hours)

Students will develop advanced skills that build upon those acquired in CO 3430. Additional skills include the technologies and applications found in Adobe Creative Suite development software (e.g., CS4 DreamWeaver). Prerequisite: CO 3430.

CO 4144 – Special Topics in Information Communication or Systems Management (1 Semester Hour)

The content of this course will vary by semester and will be designed to allow for instruction in special content areas outside the courses being offered within the Business Administration Communications or Information Systems Management areas. This course will have an information communication or systems management emphasis chosen by the Information Communication or Systems Management faculty member on the basis of student/program demand, compatibility with the general nature of the Information Communication or Systems Management concentration and related courses, and instructor interest/competence. This course will be offered periodically to meet student special interests in the field and will be designed to cover specialized topics not usually presented in depth in regular courses already listed in the Catalog. The course may be repeated for credit as long as the topic presented is substantially different than a previously taken special topics class but no more than 4 credits may be accumulated in special topics. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor (POI).

CO 4244 – Special Topics in Information Communication or Systems Management (2 Semester Hours)

The content of this course will vary by semester and will be designed to allow for instruction in special content areas outside the courses being offered within the Business Administration Communications or Information Systems Management areas. This course will have an information communication or systems management emphasis chosen by the Information Communication or Systems Management faculty member on the basis of student/program demand, compatibility with the general nature of the Information Communication or Systems Management concentration and related courses, and instructor interest/competence. This course will be offered periodically to meet student special interests in the field and will be designed to cover specialized topics not usually presented in depth in regular courses already listed in the Catalog. The course may be repeated for credit as long as the topic presented is substantially different than a previously taken special topics class but no more than 4 credits may be accumulated in special topics. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor (POI).

CO 4344 – Special Topics in Information Communication or Systems Management (3 Semester Hours)

The content of this course will vary by semester and will be designed to allow for instruction in special content areas outside the courses being offered within the Business Administration Communications or Information Systems Management areas. This course will have an information communication or systems management emphasis chosen by the Information Communication or Systems Management faculty member on the basis of student/program demand, compatibility with the general nature of the Information Communication or Systems Management concentration and related courses, and instructor interest/competence. This course will be offered periodically to meet student special interests in the field and will be designed to cover specialized topics not usually presented in depth in regular courses already listed in the Catalog. The course may be repeated for credit as long as the topic presented is substantially different than a previously taken special topics class but no more than 4 credits may be accumulated in special topics. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor (POI).

CO 4410 – CIW Preparation (4 Semester Hours)

During the senior year students may prepare to take the Certified Internet Webmaster (CIW) Foundations certification exam and/or the CIW e-Commerce Designer job role certification exam. Prerequisites: CO 4430 and CO 3430.

CO 4430 Entrepreneurship and Creating a Winning e-Business (4 Semester Hours)

This course assists students with how to conduct business online and how to manage the technological issues associated with constructing an electronic commerce Web site. Combining skills and concepts presented in this and earlier courses, students will implement a genuine transaction-enabled business-to-consumer Web site, examine strategies and products available for building electronic-commerce sites, examine how such sites are managed, and explore how they can complement an existing business infrastructure. Students get hands-on experience implementing the technology to engage cardholders, merchants, issuers, payment gateways and other parties in electronic transactions. A research paper is required. Prerequisites: BS 2400 and CO 3430.

CO 4444 Special Topics in Information Communication or Systems Management (4 Semester Hours)

The content of this course will vary by semester and will be designed to allow for instruction in special content areas outside the courses being offered within the Business Administration Communications or Information Systems Management areas. This course will have an information communication or systems management emphasis chosen by the Information Communication or Systems Management faculty member on the basis of student/program demand, compatibility with the general nature of the Information Communication or Systems Management concentration and related courses, and instructor interest/competence. This course will be offered periodically to meet student special interests in the field and will be designed to cover specialized topics not usually presented in depth in regular courses already listed in the Catalog. The course may be repeated for credit as long as the topic presented is substantially different than a previously taken special topics class but no more than 4 credits may be accumulated in special topics. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor (POI).

 

 

EC – ECONOMICS

EC 3401 – Economic Principles (4 Semester Hours)

A comprehensive course in macro and microeconomics designed to examine economic principles and show their relationship to concrete human experience. The course includes an analysis of major historic and contemporary events that have shaped twentieth century American economics.

EC 3403 – Microeconomics (4 Semester Hours)

An introduction to basic principles of economics and microeconomics. Course includes microeconomic analysis of market forces, supply and demand, price determination, market structure, and economic efficiency.

EC 3405 – Macroeconomics (4 Semester Hours)

An introduction to macroeconomics. Course includes macroeconomic instability, business cycles, inflation, unemployment, government stabilization policies, international trade balance, and long-run economic growth.

 

 

EH – ENGLISH

EH 1400 – English Fundamentals (4 Semester Hours)

This course is a review of English fundamentals and their application to collegiate level written communication. The student will demonstrate the development, organization and use of a variety of sentence structures. The student will demonstrate an understanding of the components of paragraphs in the development of multi-sentence paragraphs. This course will not count as the required general education course in Math/Natural Science.

EH 1401 – English Composition I (4 Semester Hours)

A freshman-level English composition course covering basic skills for academic and business writing. The course teaches composition and rhetoric from a “process” point of view and presents deliberate strategies for prewriting and revision. Emphasis is placed on audience awareness and purpose for writing.

EH 1402 – English Composition II (4 Semester Hours)

A second-term freshman-level English composition course that introduces students to the skills they need for essay writing, writing a research paper, writing across the curriculum, writing for business, and writing about literature.

EH 1410 – Essentials of College Writing (4 Semester Hours)

Essential writing strategies and skills required for college coursework are covered in this course. Students will be taught how to develop research papers, position papers, and case studies. The differences between interpretive and analytical writing are explored. Students will learn how to approach the research process from both the conceptual and applied perspectives. Students will learn the mechanics, style, citation, and documentation of college writing.

EH 1411 – Technical Writing (4 Semester Hours)

The study and practice of preparing written material for technical communications to professional and practitioners. Types of documents addressed include business proposals, business reports, technical manuals, operating manuals, and technical documentation. Emphasis is on accurate, effective and efficient communication. Prerequisite: EH 1410.

EH 2410 – Advanced Composition (4 Semester Hours)

This course is designed for students preparing for professional careers. This advanced course addresses expository and argumentative writing. Emphasis will be placed on critical thinking, thesis formation, research, bibliographic techniques, and stylistic skills necessary to produce articles and essays which would be appropriate for professional journals and the media.

EH 3401 – Creative Writing (4 Semester Hours)

This course will help the student develop and refine methods, style, and form for various types of creative writing. Students will write long or short poetry and fiction using a variety of creative forms. Emphasis will be placed upon revision and experimental techniques. Students will submit a final creative Portfolio of 10-20 pages of their craftsmanship.

EH 3415 – Introduction to Poetry (4 Semester Hours)

This course explores poetry in art and practice through critical, historical, and technical analysis. Students will review various types of poetry while studying poetic movements from different periods and nations. The course exposes students to major poets, literary devices, and interpretive techniques so that they gain an understanding of the purpose and meaning of poetry in general and in individual poems.

EH 4414 – English Literature (4 Semester Hours)

This course is a basic introduction to the history of the English language and survey of some of the major literary works from Beowulf to Milton.

EH 4416 – Literature of the Americas (4 Semester Hours)

Examine literary traditions of the Americas. Develop critical methodologies to analyze different works. Note: Capstone Course for the Bachelor of Science in Liberal Studies.

 

 

FD – FOUNDATION STUDIES

FD 1400 – Life Experiences (4 Semester Hours)

This course provides academic credit for documented life experiences that significantly contribute to the general education or professional development of the individual.

FD 1410 – Skills for Lifelong Learning I (4 Semester Hours)

This course examines learning theory and the application of adult learning principles to the following: communication skills, group processes, and personal management. The adult learner will develop strategies for achieving goals in school, work, and personal settings.

FD 1412 – Management Intervention (4 Semester Hours)

In this course the student develops knowledge and skills for personal and academic success. The student develops skills in setting goals, setting priorities, and assigning resources. The student will study and apply techniques related to learning styles, time management, developing successful study habits, note-taking, managing test anxiety, accessing information sources, critical thinking, and power writing. Asterisk grades will not be allowed for this course without prior approval of the Vice President of Academic Affairs.

FD 1415 – Becoming the Master Student (4 Semester Hours)

This college success course is to expose students to academic and personal tools that will help them to enhance their strengths, to acknowledge and develop their weaknesses, and to adopt tools that can be modified for lifelong learning. Topics will include learning styles, time management, developing successful study habits, note taking, test anxiety, accessing information sources, critical thinking, and power writing.

FD 1417 – The Successful College Student (4 Semester Hours)

This college success course is to help students develop academic and personal tools that will enable them to succeed in college. Topics will include learning styles, time management, developing successful study habits, note taking, test anxiety, accessing information sources, critical thinking, and power writing.

FD 2410 – World Geography (4 Semester Hours)

Nations and continents of the world are discussed. Such things as natural resources, climatic factors, occupations, and historical backgrounds of nations and continents are studied.

FD 2415 – Biblical Interpretation (4 Semester Hours)

A study of the basic principles of Biblical interpretation. The student will be introduced to the order, organization and divisions of the Bible. Fundamental procedures for considering contextual setting, author or speaker, audience, and language in understanding and interpreting Biblical passes will be studied. Consideration will also be given to the constructs of figures of speech, poetry and prophecy.

FD 2416 – Spiritual Growth for Christian Women (4 Semester Hours)

This course is designed to assist women in addressing their opportunities and challenges in achieving spiritual maturity and personal faith development in today's world. It is a study of the biblical principles of spiritual growth used by biblical models in the Old and New Testaments. This course enables Christian women to examine their own faith journey (past, present, and future) and explore strategies to mentor others in personal faith development in the contexts of family, communities of faith and society.

FD 3401 – Hermeneutics (4 Semester Hours)

An introduction to the principles, history, and methods of biblical interpretation. The course deals with fundamental considerations of grammar, vocabulary, logic, and contextual setting and also with such special problems as figures of speech, poetry, typology, and the literalism of dispensationalism.

Note: This is the Capstone Course for the Bachelor of Arts in Biblical Studies and the Bachelor of Science in Ministry/Bible and should be taken only by students nearing completion of the Bachelor of Arts in Biblical Studies or the Bachelor of Science in Ministry/Bible. For those interested in FD 3401 and are not in the Bachelor of Arts in Biblical Studies or the Bachelor of Science in Ministry/Bible, please refer to FD 3412. A student cannot receive credit for FD 3401 and FD 3412.

FD 3402 – Elementary Greek I (4 Semester Hours)

A study of the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of the Greek of the New Testament on the elementary level.

FD 3403 – Elementary Greek II (4 Semester Hours)

A continuation of FD 3402, which includes a study of the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of the Greek of the New Testament on the elementary level. Prerequisite: FD 3402.

FD 3404 – Elementary German I (4 Semester Hours)

A study of the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of the German language on the elementary level.

FD 3405 – Elementary German II (4 Semester Hours)

A continuation of FD 3404, which includes a study of the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of the German on the elementary level. Prerequisite: FD 3404.

FD 3406 – Elementary Hebrew I (4 Semester Hours)

A study of the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of the Hebrew of the Old Testament on the elementary level.

FD 3407 – Elementary Hebrew II (4 Semester Hours)

A continuation of FD 3406, which includes a study of the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of the Hebrew of the Old Testament on the elementary level. Prerequisite: FD 3406.

FD 3409 – Ministry for Christian Women (4 Semester Hours)

This course is designed to enable the Christian woman to define and pursue ministry in the biblical context. It will emphasize the role of women in ministry through an in-depth study of scriptures concerning women in the New Testament. There will also be an emphasis on a theological, practical, and philosophical exploration of the role of women in ministry, missions, and evangelism within the context of the church and community.

FD 3412 – Bible Interpretation (4 Semester Hours)

This course is an introduction to the principles, history, and methods of biblical interpretation. The course deals with fundamental considerations of grammar, vocabulary, logic, and contextual setting and also with such special problems as figures of speech, poetry, typology, and the literalism of dispensationalism.

Note: This course will not substitute for FD 3401, which is the capstone course for the Bachelor of Arts in Biblical Studies and the Bachelor of Science in Ministry/Bible. A student cannot receive credit for FD 3401 and FD 3412.

FD 3413 – Christian Women in the Home (4 Semester Hours)

This course is designed to help the Christian woman understand and function in her role in the Christian home. A special emphasis is the biblical basis for women in marriage, parenting and managing the home, and how the church can contribute to meaningful family life from the perspective of women.

FD 3418 – Library Methods and Research Skills (4 Semester Hours)

A survey of library methods, skills, and resources. An introduction to the basic procedures and resources common to research in libraries.

FD 3421 – General Introduction to the Bible I (4 Semester Hours)

A study of the revelation, canonicity, textual transmission, and English translation of the Bible.

FD 3422 – General Introduction to the Bible II (4 Semester Hours)

A survey of the text of the Bible.

FD 3431 – Elementary Akkadian I (4 Semester Hours)

A study of the grammar, syntax, and basic vocabulary of the Akkadian language.

FD 3432 – Elementary Akkadian II (4 Semester Hours)

A continuation of FD 3431, which includes a study of the grammar, syntax, and basic vocabulary of the Akkadian language. Prerequisite: FD 3431.

FD 3440 – Message Design and Delivery for Women (4 Semester Hours)

The course is designed to communicate to women the fundamental principles of biblical lesson design and delivery for women and children within the context of biblical authority.

FD 3444 – Elementary Akkadian Reading (4 Semester Hours)

A beginning course to develop skills in reading Akkadian. The course builds vocabulary, expands knowledge of grammar and syntax, and develops comprehension of the language. Prerequisites: FD 3432 and Permission of Instructor (POI).

FD 3460 – Elementary Hebrew and Greek for Christian Ministry (4 Semester Hours)

A basic course in the use of biblical Hebrew and Greek and biblical language study tools in Christian ministry. This class is designed for the student who does not plan to concentrate in biblical language study, but who needs a practical working knowledge of some elementary skills in order to enhance ministry and service.

FD 4404 – Greek Reading I (4 Semester Hours)

This course is designed to improve the students’ knowledge of Greek grammar and vocabulary and includes a thorough review of basic vocabulary and morphology. The course introduces intermediate syntax and exegesis. Textual portions will be selected by the instructor to address texts not previously addressed by the student Prerequisites: FD 3403 and Permission of Instructor (POI).

FD 4405 – Greek Reading II (4 Semester Hours)

This course is designed to improve the students’ knowledge of Greek grammar and vocabulary, and to further knowledge of the principles of advanced New Testament textual criticism and exegesis. Textual portions will be selected by the instructor to address texts not previously addressed by the student Prerequisites: FD 3403 and Permission of Instructor (POI).

FD 4406 – Greek Reading III (4 Semester Hours)

This course is designed to improve the students’ knowledge of Greek grammar and vocabulary, and to study the advanced principles of New Testament grammar and exegesis reading New Testament authors employing more advanced Greek. Textual portions will be selected by the instructor to address texts not previously addressed by the student Prerequisites: FD 3403 and Permission of Instructor (POI).

FD 4407 – Greek Reading IV (4 Semester Hours)

This course is designed to improve the students’ knowledge of Greek grammar and vocabulary, and to study the advanced principles of New Testament grammar and exegesis reading New Testament authors employing more advanced Greek. Textual portions will be selected by the instructor to address texts not previously addressed by the student Prerequisites: FD 3403 and Permission of Instructor (POI).

FD 4410 – Resume and Portfolio Completion (4 Semester Hours)

The student will develop a current full resume appropriate to the student’s field of study. The student will develop a current prospectus for employment in the form of an e-portfolio. The e-portfolio will document the student’s work related knowledge and skills. This documentation can be in the form of research, projects, reports or other materials to be identified by instructor and student.

FD 4411 – Hebrew Reading I (4 Semester Hours)

A course developing skills in reading selected portions of the Hebrew Old Testament. It is designed to build vocabulary, develop knowledge of grammar and syntax, and introduce principles of textual criticism and exegesis. Textual portions will be selected by the instructor to address text not previously addressed by the student. Prerequisites: FD 3407 and Permission of Instructor (POI).

FD 4412 – Hebrew Reading II (4 Semester Hours)

A course developing skills in reading selected portions of the Hebrew Old Testament. It is designed to build vocabulary, develop knowledge of grammar and syntax, and introduce principles of textual criticism and exegesis. Textual portions will be selected by the instructor to address text not previously addressed by the student. Prerequisites: FD 3407 and Permission of Instructor (POI).

FD 4413 – Hebrew Reading III (4 Semester Hours)

A course developing skills in reading selected portions of the Hebrew Old Testament. It is designed to build vocabulary, develop knowledge of grammar and syntax, and introduce principles of textual criticism and exegesis. Textual portions will be selected by the instructor to address text not previously addressed by the student. Prerequisites: FD 3407 and Permission of Instructor (POI).

FD 4414 – Biblical Aramaic (4 Semester Hours)

A study of the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of biblical Aramaic. Prerequisite: FD 3407.

FD 4415 – Hebrew Reading IV (4 Semester Hours)

A course developing skills in reading selected portions of the Hebrew Old Testament. It is designed to build vocabulary, develop knowledge of grammar and syntax, and introduce principles of textual criticism and exegesis. Textual portions will be selected by the instructor to address text not previously addressed by the student. Prerequisites: FD 3407 and Permission of Instructor (POI).

FD 4416 – Elementary Classical Syriac (4 Semester Hours)

A study of the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of classical Syriac, a branch of the Aramaic language family. The course involves reading Syriac portions of the Old Testament and New Testament. Prerequisite: FD 4414.

FD 4417 – Biblical Archaeology (4 Semester Hours)

An introduction to the principles, methods, problems, and setting of archaeology in relation to the Bible. The results of archaeological discoveries are studied for their contribution to the understanding of the Bible. Some attention is given to the methods and problems of biblical archaeology.

FD 4420 – Geography of Bible Lands (4 Semester Hours)

A study of the geographical and historical settings of biblical literature, including Palestine, Egypt, Mesopotamia, Asia Minor, Greece and Rome. Attention is given to the effects of geological, climatological, and topographical features upon the lives of the people as well as to particular places that are connected with biblical events.

FD 4425 – Intertestamental History (4 Semester Hours)

A survey of the history of the Jewish people from Malachi to Matthew. It includes a study of the Old Testament apocrypha and pseudepigrapha.

FD 4430 – The Holy Spirit (4 Semester Hours)

A study of the biblical teachings on the Holy Spirit.

FD 4435 – Elementary Latin I (4 Semester Hours)

A study of the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of the Latin language on the elementary level.

FD 4436 – Elementary Latin II (4 Semester Hours)

A continuation of FD 4435, which includes a study of the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of the Latin language on the elementary level. Prerequisite: FD 4435.

FD 4437 – Latin Reading I (4 Semester Hours)

This course is designed to advance the students grammar and vocabulary in Latin. Students will read Latin prose and poetry. Prerequisites: FD 4436 and Permission of Instructor (POI).

FD 4438 – Latin Reading II (4 Semester Hours)

This course is designed to further advance the students’ grammar and vocabulary in Latin. Students will read Latin prose and poetry. This is a continuation of FD 4437. Prerequisites: FD 4437 and Permission of Instructor (POI).

 

 

GS – GENERAL STUDIES

GS 3420 – Lifetime Health and Fitness (4 Semester Hours)

A survey of the components of good lifetime health practices including types of exercise, cardiovascular fitness, nutrition and diet, stress and mental health, and avoiding injury.

GS 4401 – Readings in Classics (4 Semester Hours)

A course requiring the reading of selected classical literature. Written reactions to the readings are required.

GS 4402 – Readings in History (4 Semester Hours)

A course requiring the reading of selected historical literature. Written reactions to the readings are required.

GS 4403 – Readings in Natural Sciences (4 Semester Hours)

A course requiring readings in the field of natural science. Written reactions to the readings are required.

GS 4404 – Readings in Philosophy and Theology (4 Semester Hours)

A course requiring readings in the field of philosophy. Written reactions to the readings are required.

 

 

GT – GOVERNMENT

GT 2401 – You and the American Government (4 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of the U.S. Federal government and its impact on individuals. The structure and function of the three branches are studied. The Constitution and its relationship to Federal, State, and local governments is reviewed.

Note: This is the Capstone Course for the Associate of Arts in Liberal Studies and should be taken only by students nearing completion of the Associate of Arts in Liberal Studies. For those interested in GT 2401 and are not in the Associate of Arts in Liberal Studies, please refer to GT 2405. A student cannot receive credit for GT 2401 and GT 2405.

GT 2405 – Your American Government (4 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of the U.S. Federal government and its impact on individuals. The structure and function of the three branches are studied. The Constitution and its relationship to Federal, State, and local governments is reviewed.

Note: This course will not substitute for GT 2401, which is the capstone course for the Associate of Arts in Liberal Studies. A student cannot receive credit for GT 2401 and GT 2405.

GT 3401 – Survey of American Government (4 Semester Hours)

A survey course that focuses on teaching students how to access their government and involve themselves in it. Topics include the Constitution; the functions of the executive, the legislative, and the judicial branches of the Federal government; the relation of the Federal government to state and local governments; the election process; and individual rights.

HD – HUMAN and SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

HD 4401 – Introduction to Child Development (4 Semester Hours)

A study of psychosocial growth and development in childhood and adolescence, including recent theoretical and applied perspectives for caring for and working with children.

HD 4402 – Seasons of Life (4 Semester Hours)

Think about the life cycle as a whole. Understand that it has a history, both collective and individual. Learn useful theoretical perspectives for understanding that life cycle.

HD 4403 – Psychology in Life (4 Semester Hours)

To teach the scientific basis of psychological reasoning. A theoretical unbiased, eclectic overview of all the major fields of psychology is reviewed to make the field of psychology relevant to students’ everyday lives.

HD 4404 – Counseling Theories and Practice (4 Semester Hours)

Explore the major theories of counseling and counseling models and methodologies. Various models are studied intensively to provide students an opportunity to learn how to approach and attempt to facilitate their own growth as human service workers.

HD 4405 – Abnormal Psychology (4 Semester Hours)

Examine typical behavior from several theoretical perspectives. Consider normality and abnormality in historical perspective. Review a number of leading theoretical schemes for understanding and explaining behavior and various modes of assessment, treatment, and prevention.

HD 4406 – Theories of Personality and Motivation (4 Semester Hours)

Study the psychology of personality. Gain a broad grasp of the field of contemporary personality psychology. Learn about three distinct but interrelated areas in the study of personality: theory, assessment, and research.

HD 4407 – Motivation and Performance (4 Semester Hours)

This course examines leadership in relation to major issues and the means of organizing principles that delineate the topic of motivation.

HD 4408 – Thinking About Race, Class and Gender (4 Semester Hours)

Explore race, class, and gender, with an emphasis on conceptual tools developed since the 1970s in both empirical studies and critical thought about these categories. The student will develop analytic methods for understanding distinctions and controversies, e.g., the differences between sex and gender; the difference between race and ethnicity; arguments for and against affirmative action; and the ways in which race, gender, and class overlap.

HD 4409 – Family and Society (4 Semester Hours)

This course studies the institutions of the family in contemporary America, its definitions and functions in our society. Includes the social psychology of male-female and intergenerational relationships and the “politics” of family relationships.

Note: This is the Capstone Course for the Bachelor of Science in Human Development and should be taken only by students nearing completion of the Bachelor of Science in Human Development. For those interested in HD 4409 and are not in the Bachelor of Science in Human Development, please refer to HD 4411. A student cannot receive credit for HD 4409 and HD 4411.

HD 4411 – Families in Society (4 Semester Hours)

This course studies the institutions of the family in contemporary America, its definitions and functions in our society. Includes the social psychology of male-female and intergenerational relationships and the “politics” of family relationships.

Note: This course will not substitute for HD 4409, which is the capstone course for the Bachelor of Science in Human Development. A student cannot receive credit for HD 4409 and HD 4411.

HD 4420 – Human Resources Management: Analysis and Procedures (4 Semester Hours)

An introduction to practical situations, problem solving and the role and function of the human resource department in the area of employee counseling, discipline, equitable compensation, benefit programs and termination. A review is made of the process, organization, legal equal opportunity issues, evolution of human resource management and the importance placed on it in the corporate and non-profit sector.

HD 4422 – Employment Law for Organizations (4 Semester Hours)

The human and legal context of industrial and business relations with special emphasis on employment discrimination, wrongful termination, sex discrimination, sexual harassment, age discrimination, disability, etc. Law principles are exposed and identified in the employment process.

HD 4424 – Human Labor Relations (4 Semester Hours)

A study of human negotiation techniques, contract preparation, mediation, arbitration, conciliation, collective bargaining, strikes, boycotts, lockouts, company unions, injunctions, and employee representations.

Note: This is the Capstone Course for the Bachelor of Science in Human Resource Leadership and should be taken only by students nearing completion of the Bachelor of Science in Human Resource Leadership. For those interested in HD 4424 and are not in the Bachelor of Science in Human Resource Leadership, please refer to HD 4425. A student cannot receive credit for HD 4424 and HD 4425.

HD 4425 – Labor Relations (4 Semester Hours)

This is a study of human negotiation techniques, contract preparation, mediation, arbitration, conciliation, collective bargaining, strikes, boycotts, lockouts, company unions, injunctions, and employee representations.

Note: This course will not substitute for HD 4424, which is the capstone course for the Bachelor of Science in Human Resource Leadership. A student cannot receive credit for HD 4424 and HD 4425.

HD 4426 – Fundamentals of Effective Leadership (4 Semester Hours)

This course helps students understand the characteristics of effective leaders in the workplace, home, church, community, and society. How leaders create visions, and how they motivate employees to move the organization forward in today’s marketplace.

HD 4430 – Psychological Profiling (4 Semester Hours)

An introduction to the field of research attempting to gain insight into the criminal thought processes, motivations and behavior from a law enforcement perspective.

HD 4436 – Community and Human Services (4 Semester Hours)

This course is an introduction to the theory, history, and process of community-based human service agencies with emphasis on the function of therapy and counseling. Students will study fundamental systemic principles for consultations with larger systems such as private and governmental agencies.

HD 4440 – Community Relations (4 Semester Hours)

Community setting considerations as it relates to relationships, interactions, and communication. Complex factors involved in the area of human relations as it affects policing and police management in the community.

HD 4445 – Crisis Negotiation and Intervention (4 Semester Hours)

The class will give valuable information for law enforcement officers as well as members of the clergy assisting law enforcement in the preservation of life. Information learned here could save the life of a suicidal person or those who barricade themselves and attempt to force the police to end their lives. By knowing what police and psychologist do in these life and death situations, one will better know how to assist during such incidents. By knowing the signs leading up to these situations, one will see possible ways of preventing them.

HD 4446 – Crisis Negotiations Mechanics (4 Semester Hours)

The process of crisis negotiations in law enforcement and corrections has two different yet interdependent aspects. One is the mechanics of the process, how to initiate and engage in crisis negotiations. The other is the psychological segment, how to deal with internal and external stressors. This course addresses the mechanics of crisis negotiation. The course will focus on the history of crisis negotiations, case studies, team configuration, roles and responsibilities, “Group Think,” the proper and effective use of time, risk assessment, the bargaining process, indicators of surrender versus indicators of suicidal behavior, demands and deadline issues and first responder issues and answers.

HD 4447 – Crisis Negotiations Psychological Aspects (4 Semester Hours)

The process of crisis negotiations in law enforcement and corrections has two different yet interdependent aspects. One is the mechanics of the process, how to initiate and engage in crisis negotiations. The other is the psychological segment, how to deal with internal and external stressors. This course will address the psychological aspects of crisis negotiation including victim, subject, and negotiator issues. This course focuses on the psychological make-up of hostage takers, negotiating with subjects who differ in their motivation, dealing with internal and external stressors, the “Stockholm Syndrome,” and the reality of the stress that crisis negotiation creates for the negotiator. Time proven remedies for these issues and situations will be addressed.

 

 

HE – HEALTH

HE 1401 – Health (4 Semester Hours)

An introductory guide to healthy living that encompasses all areas of health: the physical, emotional, social, intellectual, and spiritual. Topics include fitness, exercise, and diet; the impact of relationships on health; threats to health posed by illness, injuries, and substance abuse; threats to public health such as AIDS and pollution; and health issues such as health care providers, health self-care, aging, and death and dying.

HE 1405 – Human Nutrition (4 Semester Hours)

This course is a survey of all aspects of human nutrition including food choices and guidelines, how the human body works with respect to nutrition, weight management, nutrition from infancy through adulthood, food technology, and malnutrition.

 

 

HM – HUMANITIES

HM 1410 – Introduction to the Humanities (4 Semester Hours)

This course is an introduction to the arts through their expressions in dominant themes of western culture. The concepts of nature and the individual in society are explored in the artistic works from the ancient world to the medieval times. The course provides a foundation for understanding and evaluating contemporary art.

HM 1420 – Introduction to Music (4 Semester Hours)

This is an introductory course which explores the basics of music. Perceptive listening through a historical survey is explored.

HM 1425 – Music Literature (4 Semester Hours)

This course surveys music from the middle ages through the present.

HM 2410 – Introduction to Ethics (4 Semester Hours)

An investigation of the foundations and principles of Christian ethics, with special attention to problems in moral judgment and evaluation. Current ethical issues are critiqued from a biblical perspective.

HM 3401 – Human Relations and Leadership (4 Semester Hours)

A consideration of relationships and communication in various personal and sociological settings. Topics include non-verbal communication, feedback, dealing with anger, and conflict resolution. Applicable to developing leadership roles in the family, church, community, and workplace.

HM 4406 – Writing in Style (4 Semester Hours)

A course to help the student to learn to write in a variety of styles, ranging from popular to literary to scholarly. The student will prepare articles for various purposes.

HM 4407 – Major Themes in Literature (4 Semester Hours)

Organized around significant and profound universal themes, a variety of quality selections of poetry, prose and drama will be explored in this course. Themes may include, but are not limited to, love, death, peace, spirituality, isolation and identity. Using literary devices, students will analyze and understand selections of literature representing different universal themes from all three major genres of literature. Exposure to universal themes in literature will allow students to discern how literature captures and presents the human condition and experience.

 

 

HS – HOMELAND SECURITY

HS 2403 – Introduction to Public Safety and Security (4 Semester Hours)

This course provides an overview of the various agencies associated with public safety and security. The purpose, function, structure, and career areas in public safety, criminal justice, homeland security, and industrial and organizational security will be studied. The emergence, evolution, and impact on society of these services will be addressed.

HS 2420 – Domestic Terrorism and Hate Crimes (4 Semester Hours)

The issue of bigotry and hate crime and how it manifests itself in criminal behavior is examined. Various groups who have been labeled as supporting or engaging in domestic terrorism will be studied. Focus is placed on federal and state statutory laws and the dynamics of police, court, and corrections-based responses to the problem.

HS 3415 – Investigating Terrorism (4 Semester Hours)

This course covers the contemporary issues faced by the US government and criminal justice professionals in containing terrorism. Students discuss and evaluate government strategies in combating terrorism. They also explore important issues linked to terrorism, including the effects on federal laws, the use of the media by terrorist, and the impact on civil liberties.

HS 3421 – Terrorism Risk Assessment (4 Semester Hours)

The determination of our vulnerability to terrorist attack and our appropriate hardening of our defenses will greatly depend on our ability to think like the perpetrators of these heinous crimes. For the terrorist, the entire planet has become the battlefield and there are no rules of engagement. Realistic scenarios will be used to illustrate subject material covered in the course.

HS 3430 – Situation Assessment (4 Semester Hours)

This course is designed to give the learner the skills required to better understand the steps needed to cope with the initial and ongoing needs of the incident. The elements of this course can be used in a variety of emergency and non-emergency situations.

HS 4415 – World Conflict (4 Semester Hours)

Classical and contemporary theories of war and peace; just and unjust wars; principles of strategic analysis, arms control, and security policy-making; the proliferation of nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons. The international trade in arms; nationalism, ethnic conflict, and wars of secession.

HS 4440 – Psychology and Sociology of Terrorism (4 Semester Hours)

The Weapons of Mass Destruction [WMDS] are such that even a modest terrorist action will to some considerable degree lead to achievement of the perpetrators’ goals, whether these weapons are in fact used as weapons of mass destructions or as weapons of terror. Realistic scenarios will be used to illustrate subject material covered in the course.

HS 4450 – Homeland Security Overview (4 Semester Hours)

This course is designed as the culminating experience of the baccalaureate program in homeland security. This course comprises a series of assignments that integrate concepts from the homeland security curriculum. The assignments are designed to test application skills in working through fact-based scenarios as well as critical thinking skills through analysis of issues affecting contemporary practice.

Note: This is the Capstone Course for the Bachelor of Science in Public Safety and Homeland Security and should be taken only by students nearing completion of the Bachelor of Science in Public Safety and Homeland Security.

 

 

HY – HISTORY

HY 1401 – United States History I (4 Semester Hours)

A study of America’s early history from the colonial period to the Civil War and Reconstruction. The course incorporates current research in social history along with consideration of great figures and important events to tell the human story as well as the political and economic stories of America.

HY 1402 – United States History II (4 Semester Hours)

An introductory-level course that uses a chronological approach to American history from the Postreconstruction era to the present. The course focuses on the development of the United States since 1877, analyzing the people, events, and forces that made America what it is today.

HY 2403 – Western Civilization I (4 Semester Hours)

A survey of Western civilization from its pre-Western precursors through the classical periods of Greece and Rome to the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. This course weaves together history, art, literature, religion, geography, government, and economics to help students analyze and appreciate history.

HY 2404 – Western Civilization II (4 Semester Hours)

A survey of Western civilization beginning with the Wars of Religion and continuing through the industrial modernization to the present. This course helps students recognize the pendulum swings of history, identify parallels in the modern world, and gain a sense of their own place in the development of human institution and culture.

HY 3410 – Women in American History (4 Semester Hours)

This course focuses on the contributions women have made to United States history, from its colonial beginnings through the twentieth century. Along with issues of women's rights, students will examine family structures, social expectations, women in the workplace, and women and leadership, as they have developed throughout the history of the American republic.

HY 3415 – Disease Epidemics that Changed History (4 Semester Hours)

This course focuses on the impact that major disease epidemics have had on social, political and economic history. Major epidemics studied include the Black Death in 14th-century Europe and the Influenza Epidemic of the early twentieth century. Students will evaluate the impact of these and other, more localized, demographic catastrophes, focusing on the vulnerabilities and sustainability of families, governments, and religious organizations in time of crisis.

HY 4405 – Germany, Hitler and the Holocaust (4 Semester Hours)

This course focuses on the developments in Germany after World War I, the factors that led to the rise of Hitler, and the instigation of the Holocaust as World War II began. Students will examine the cultural, economic, and political factors that led to Hitler’s rise and to the extermination of the majority of Europe’s Jewish population.

 

 

LJ – LAW AND JUSTICE

LJ 2401 – Corrections and Penal Systems in the U.S. (4 Semester Hours)

This course explores the past as well as the cutting edge of the corrections field in the United States with an overview of each of the categories that make up corrections including: incarcerated terrorist offenders, legal issues in imprisoning terrorists, federal legislation to restrict post-conviction conditions, conditions of confinement appeals, historical perspectives, the court process, imprisonment alternatives, correctional systems and functions, institutional clients and their rights, reintegration systems, and the future of corrections.

LJ 2409 – Criminal Investigation (4 Semester Hours)

This course explains the importance and legal significance of evidence. It demonstrates how the investigative process works from crime scene preservation to case preparation and courtroom. It also examines various techniques during criminal investigations such as photography, interviewing, evidence handling and scene reconstruction, and how each applies to specific types of crimes. An analytical examination of crime detection and solution, including such topics as crime scene procedures, physical evidence, interviews, field notes and reporting, follow-up investigation, interrogation, and rules of evidence.

LJ 2445 – Criminology (4 Semester Hours)

This course explains criminal behavior in relationship to various theories and analysis through historical explanations including classic theories and current developments of crime causation. Society's response to criminal behavior is reviewed through the assessment of legal approaches and the aspects of the criminal justice system. Discussion of types of crime, terrorism, and recent laws affecting violent criminal acts are distinguished. Research affecting social policy and public crime concerns are examined including social problems and social responsibility perspectives.

LJ 3401 – Criminal Justice (4 Semester Hours)

An assessment of law enforcement, corrections, and the judicial system with an examination of cause, effect, and the ultimate consequences the judicial system will have on criminal justice.

LJ 3405 – Criminal Law (4 Semester Hours)

The concepts of law with a historical and philosophical correlation to preserving life and property, offense against persons and property, and common offense and defense against criminal acts.

LJ 3406 – Criminal Evidence (4 Semester Hours)

This course examines procedural requirements for judicial processing of criminal offenders. The course provides students with a thorough understanding of the US justice system from the time of prearrest investigation through the sentencing phase. Students gain an understanding of different types of evidence, including hearsay, opinion, and circumstantial. Students will study concepts such as due process, the exclusionary rule, search and seizure, confession and admissions, discovery, and civil liability. Students will also be required to brief courtroom cases.

LJ 3407 – Comparative Criminal Justice Systems (4 Semester Hours)

An overview of basic criminal justice systems in the world including common, civil, Islamic, and Socialist. The student will review the United States’ criminal justice system and study the concepts of criminal law, law enforcement, courts, corrections, and punishment. The cultural and political settings of criminal justice systems will be studied.

LJ 3411 – Criminal Procedures (4 Semester Hours)

This course explores ethical decision-making systems in human interaction in the professional world, and how individual decision-making can have broad, ethical positive or negative consequences. Students will attempt to resolve ethical dilemmas faced by leaders in specific situations common to their workplace environment, and legal procedures such as privacy and legal dilemmas.

LJ 3413 – Fraud Examination/Investigation (4 Semester Hours)

This course is designed to provide students with the skills to successfully investigate the most common fraud scams committed against individuals and businesses. It focuses upon the basics of fraud investigation by concentrating on specific fraudulent offenses and how to effectively identify and resolve these crimes. Students will learn how to recognize fraud, prevent fraudulent activity, and ultimately investigate acts of theft.

LJ 3415 – Terrorism Today (4 Semester Hours)

This course is to acquaint the Criminal Justice student with the concept of terrorism at both the international and domestic levels. Topics include the history of terrorism, terrorism today and terrorism in the future. Counter measures taken to respond to terrorist threats are also examined.

LJ 3417 – White Collar Crime (4 Semester Hours)

An examination of criminal activity in our communities, business and corporate enterprises. Learners will examine the various types of white-collar crime, methods of detection, investigative techniques, and social impact. They will further review specific cases and examine articles relating to this sophisticated crime contravening our privacy and social values.

LJ 3421 – Organized Crime (4 Semester Hours)

A discussion of the evolution of organized crime in the United States, the social and legal factors that contributed to its development, and the groups involved. Also explored is how organized crime is structured and how it can be exposed and controlled. Theoretical explanations of organized crime are also covered.

LJ 3440 – Public Information Officer (4 Semester Hours)

This course is an introduction to the position, responsibility and required skills to act as a Public Information Officer (PIO) in an emergency situation. Upon successful completion of this course the participants will be able to: define the role of the Public Information Officer; discuss the basic skills and specialized knowledge that an effective emergency management PIO must possess; compare proactive vs. reactive public information; create a PIO’s job description and spectrum of responsibilities; explain the role of the PIO in the four phases of emergency management (preparedness, mitigation, response and recovery); list what the public needs and wants to know during an emergency; explain how to gather and disseminate information during an emergency; use common PIO communications technology; describe how to access the Emergency Broadcast System; and deliver a statement either verbal or written based on a simulated incident.

LJ 3445 – Criminology (4 Semester Hours)

This course explains criminal behavior in relationship to various theories and analysis through historical explanations including classic theories and current developments of crime causation. Society's response to criminal behavior is reviewed through the assessment of legal approaches and the aspects of the criminal justice system. Discussion of types of crime, terrorism, and recent laws affecting violent criminal acts are distinguished. Research affecting social policy and public crime concerns are examined including social problems and social responsibility perspectives.

LJ 3450 – Public Safety Incident Report Writing (4 Semester Hours)

Emphasizes observation and writing skills needed to record crime scenes, emergency response situations, and routine occurrences. Requires accurate, clear, concise, complete and acceptable standard written English appropriate for court presentation. Intended for criminal justice practitioners.

LJ 4144 – Special Topics in Public Safety (1 Semester Hour)

The content of this course will vary by semester and will be designed to allow for instruction in special content areas outside the courses being offered within the Criminal Justice, Public Safety, or Security programs. This course will have a Criminal Justice emphasis chosen by a Criminal Justice faculty member on the basis of student/program demand, compatibility with the general nature of the Criminal Justice, Public Safety, or Security programs related courses, and instructor interest/competence. This course will be offered periodically to meet student special interests in the field and will be designed to cover specialized topics not usually presented in depth in regular courses already listed in the Catalog. The course may be repeated for credit as long as the topic presented is substantially different than a previously taken special topics class but no more than 4 credits may be accumulated. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor (POI).

LJ 4244 – Special Topics in Public Safety (2 Semester Hours)

The content of this course will vary by semester and will be designed to allow for instruction in special content areas outside the courses being offered within the Criminal Justice, Public Safety, or Security programs. This course will have a Criminal Justice emphasis chosen by a Criminal Justice faculty member on the basis of student/program demand, compatibility with the general nature of the Criminal Justice, Public Safety, or Security programs related courses, and instructor interest/competence. This course will be offered periodically to meet student special interests in the field and will be designed to cover specialized topics not usually presented in depth in regular courses already listed in the Catalog. The course may be repeated for credit as long as the topic presented is substantially different than a previously taken special topics class but no more than 4 credits may be accumulated. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor (POI).

LJ 4344 – Special Topics in Public Safety (3 Semester Hours)

The content of this course will vary by semester and will be designed to allow for instruction in special content areas outside the courses being offered within the Criminal Justice, Public Safety, or Security programs. This course will have a Criminal Justice emphasis chosen by a Criminal Justice faculty member on the basis of student/program demand, compatibility with the general nature of the Criminal Justice, Public Safety, or Security programs related courses, and instructor interest/competence. This course will be offered periodically to meet student special interests in the field and will be designed to cover specialized topics not usually presented in depth in regular courses already listed in the Catalog. The course may be repeated for credit as long as the topic presented is substantially different than a previously taken special topics class but no more than 4 credits may be accumulated. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor (POI).

LJ 4401 – Constitutional Law (4 Semester Hours)

This course is an introduction to constitutional law. The student will develop an understanding of the history and purpose of the U.S. Constitution with emphasis on the role of the U.S. Supreme Court, the process of judicial review, and the protections of the Bill of Rights.

LJ 4421 – Supervisory Practices in Criminal Justice (4 Semester Hours)

This course combines state-of-the-art behavioral theory with numerous cases that allow students to identify and resolve personnel and organization problems. It prepares students for effective police management and supervision.

LJ 4430 – Incident Command System (4 Semester Hours)

Explores the dynamics of managing major emergency incidents and examines the National Incident Command System. Focuses on major incidents where large life, property, or economic losses are possible. Includes organization and staffing, incident and event planning/staffing, organizing a response to an incident, and incident resource management. Actual incidents are discussed and analyzed. Incorporates learning from the experience of others in handling major emergencies and preplanning for emergencies.

LJ 4435 – Managing Criminal Justice Organizations (4 Semester Hours)

This course deals with concepts and theory in the field of organizational behavior. The course focuses on the historical perspectives of organizational theories of motivations and leadership, and future trends and developments in modern police organizations.

LJ 4440 – Criminal Justice Internship (4 Semester Hours)

This course provides students with the opportunity to apply theory to practice. This experience is designed to help students integrate their academic experience into professional police practice. Students will spend 20 hours per week at their internship site to complete course requirement.

LJ 4444 – Special Topics in Public Safety (4 Semester Hours)

The content of this course will vary by semester and will be designed to allow for instruction in special content areas outside the courses being offered within the Criminal Justice, Public Safety, or Security programs. This course will have a Criminal Justice emphasis chosen by a Criminal Justice faculty member on the basis of student/program demand, compatibility with the general nature of the Criminal Justice, Public Safety, or Security programs related courses, and instructor interest/competence. This course will be offered periodically to meet student special interests in the field and will be designed to cover specialized topics not usually presented in depth in regular courses already listed in the Catalog. The course may be repeated for credit as long as the topic presented is substantially different than a previously taken special topics class but no more than 4 credits may be accumulated. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor (POI).

LJ 4450 – Criminal Justice Overview (4 Semester Hours)

This course is designed as the culminating experience of the baccalaureate program in criminal justice. This course comprises a series of assignments that integrate concepts from the criminal justice curriculum. The assignments are designed to test application skills in working through fact-based scenarios as well as critical thinking skills through analysis of issues affecting contemporary practice.

Note: This is the Capstone Course for the Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice and should be taken only by students nearing completion of the Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice.

 

 

MC – MANAGEMENT COMMUNICATION

MC 1405 – Communicating via e-Portfolio and Resume (4 Semester Hours)

The student will learn to develop a prospectus in the form of an e-portfolio which will effectively communicate with prospective employers and other audiences. The student will learn to prepare a full resume appropriate to the student’s field of study. The student will learn to select, organize, and incorporate into the e-portfolio materials which will document the student’s work related knowledge and skills.

MC 1410 – Speech and Written Communication Skills for Career Growth (4 Semester Hours)

Students will learn the necessary skills for effective formal and informal speech and written communication in the workplace and in today’s society. Basic communication theories are discussed. The fundamentals of oral and written communication skills are addressed. Students will be taught how to apply these skills and theories to group processes and professional situations.

MC 1415 – Interpersonal Communication Skills (4 Semester Hours)

Students will learn effective interpersonal skills. Topics that are explored include: self-awareness, group process, self-disclosure, effective communication, conflict resolution, and team building.

MC 4401 – Leadership Principles and Ethics (4 Semester Hours)

A study of leadership as a process with focus on the personal qualities and skills of the leader, the nature of followers, and diverse leadership situations including the challenge of change.

MC 4402 – Communication in Professional Settings (4 Semester Hours)

The context of business communications, the message, the media, written reports, and oral communication principles is explored.

MC 4403 – Organizational Theory and Behavior (4 Semester Hours)

Topics include fundamentals of organizational behavior, leadership, motivation, group behavior, managing change, and cross-cultural issues. Case studies are an integral part of the course.

MC 4404 – Human Relations and Problem Solving (4 Semester Hours)

The role of human relations in performance, importance of communication skills, team behavior, and organizational change are explored.

MC 4405 – Contemporary Supervision (4 Semester Hours)

The functions of planning, organizing, staffing, leading, and controlling in supervision are discussed.

MC 4406 – Professional Public Relations (4 Semester Hours)

This course focuses on the professional practices in public relations, and the process and the nature of the public. This course also addresses the correct procedures for maintaining an appropriate relationship between a business or agency and the public. The principles and conflicts of the public’s right to know and the institution’s right and obligation to protect information are also examined.

MC 4407 – Management Principles (4 Semester Hours)

Foundational considerations, contemporary issues, and developing skills in planning, staffing, and directing in management are explored.

MC 4408 – Money Management and Personal Finance (4 Semester Hours)

This course addresses the economic principles and financial decisions a person can expect to confront. Topics include budgeting and buying, spending and credit, saving and investing, home ownership, income tax, insurance, wills, and trusts. This course will provide the student with an understanding for making informed personal financial decisions.

MC 4409 – Conflict Management and Negotiation (4 Semester Hours)

This course explores understanding the nature of conflict and its impacts on organizations. This course defines conflict, what causes it, how it develops, and how it affects organizations. Negotiation fundamentals, strategy, and remedies in various contexts are also addressed.

Note: This is the Capstone Course for the Bachelor of Science in Management Communication and should be taken only by students nearing completion of the Bachelor of Science in Management Communication. For those interested in MC 4409 and are not in the Bachelor of Science in Management Communication, please refer to MC 4411. A student cannot receive credit for MC 4409 and MC 4411.

MC 4411 – Conflict Management (4 Semester Hours)

This course explores understanding the nature of conflict and its impacts on organizations. This course defines conflict, what causes it, how it develops, and how it affects organizations. Negotiation fundamentals, strategy, and remedies in various contexts are also addressed.

Note: This course will not substitute for MC 4409, which is the capstone course for the Bachelor of Science in Management Communication. A student cannot receive credit for MC 4409 and MC 4411.

MC 4420 – Ethical Leadership and Criminal Procedures (4 Semester Hours)

This course explores ethical decision-making systems in human interaction in the professional world, and how individual decision-making can have broad, ethical positive or negative consequences. Students will attempt to resolve ethical dilemmas faced by leaders in specific situations common to their workplace environment, and legal procedures such as privacy and legal dilemmas.

MC 4426 – Interview and Interrogation (4 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of person to person information gathering for an investigation. The differences between interviewing and interrogating will be explored. The purpose, process and product of interviewing and interrogating will be addressed.

 

 

MH – MATHEMATICS

MH 1400 – Mathematics Review (4 Semester Hours)

This course is designed to review basic math concepts for our students that have been away from mathematics for some time and to give confidence to those students who are unsure of their college math skills or just not yet up to speed in math. It will not count as the required general education course in Math/Natural Science. This course prepares students for other math classes. Topics include fundamental operations in whole numbers, fractions and decimals, percents, ratios and proportions, descriptive statistics, basic problem solving, basic properties of sets, basic equations, major concepts of geometry, mathematics of simple finance.

MH 1401 – General Mathematics (4 Semester Hours)

A basic, entry-level mathematics course for non-math majors that explores mathematics applications to problem solving in a variety of fields.

MH 1402 – Introductory Algebra (4 Semester Hours)

A course for students without an adequate background for College algebra. Topics include fundamental operations of real numbers, linear equations, polynomials, rational expressions, roots, and radicals.

MH 1403 – College Algebra (4 Semester Hours)

Linear and quadratic equations and inequalities, functions and graphs, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions.

MH 1405 – Survey of Mathematics (4 Semester Hours)

This course is designed as a general College Level course but it is tailored to be most useful for students going into the social sciences, religion, and humanities. It provides an appreciation of mathematics, highlighting mathematical history, and applications of math to the arts and sciences. It gives a general overview of mathematics and problem solving as it relates to the real world, and emphasizes applications in non-math and science areas, especially those in the liberal arts, the social sciences, business, nursing, religion and allied health fields.

 

 

MS – MISSIONS STUDIES

MS 4401 – Survey of World Religions (4 Semester Hours)

A survey of the various religions of the world, including Islam, Judaism, Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism and others. They are critiqued from a Christian perspective. Emphasis is given to Christian mission efforts among adherents of other world religions.

MS 4402 – Introduction to Missiology (4 Semester Hours)

An introduction to the biblical origins, history, and techniques of cross-cultural evangelism, with attention being given to contemporary issues of missiology.

MS 4403 – Cross-Cultural Evangelism (4 Semester Hours)

A study of the necessary ingredients for effectively communicating the gospel in a cross-cultural setting. Such concepts as culture, world view, identification, contextualization, syncretism, animism, cognitive processes, behavioral patterns, indigenization, and acculturation will be examined.

MS 4404 – Missionary Life and Work (4 Semester Hours)

A practical examination of the obstacles encountered by the missionary working in a culture other than one’s own. Topics covered will range from the selections of a mission field to the training of converts.

MS 4420 – Field Experience in Missions (4 Semester Hours)

An experience on a chosen mission field accomplished by reading assigned material and working under an instructor from Amridge University. A mission trip is required for this course.

 

 

NT – NEW TESTAMENT STUDIES

NT 2440 – The Passion of Christ and the Establishment of the Church (4 Semester Hours)

A study of the last days of Christ on Earth emphasizing his death, burial, resurrection and ascension from Matthew 26-28, Mark 14-16, and Luke 22-24. The establishment and beginning of the church is studied from the Gospels and the book of Acts with emphases on is organization, worship, life and problems.

NT 2445 – Miracles and Parables of Christ (4 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of each of the miracles of Christ and the purposed of each miracle. The course also studies the parables of Christ. It investigates the methodology of the Master Teacher as well as the significance of each parable.

NT 3402 – The Synoptic Gospels (4 Semester Hours)

An overview of the gospels of Matthew, Mark and Luke with an exegesis of selected texts. The authorship, date, purpose, and text of the books are studied. Special attention is given to parallel and unique texts.

NT 3403 – Introduction and Survey of the New Testament (4 Semester Hours)

An introduction to the New Testament, with specific attention to its inspiration, text, canon, and authority. Each book will be considered individually in the light of its purpose and historical setting, and attention will be given to its message to its first recipients and to its readers of all time. This course is the basic course for this area. It is expected to be taken early in the program.

NT 3404 – NT: Matthew, Mark Luke and John (4 Semester Hours)

An overview of the gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John with an exegesis of selected texts. The authorship, date, purpose, and text of the books are studied. Special attention is given to parallel and unique texts.

NT 3406 – Life and Teachings of Christ (4 Semester Hours)

A survey and study of the life and teachings of Jesus Christ according to the Gospel accounts. Special attention will be given to the mission and claims of Jesus, to the role of miracles in His ministry, and to the distinctive methods and content of His teaching.

NT 3407 – Gospel of John (4 Semester Hours)

An investigation of the historical milieu of the gospel of John and an introduction to its contents, with an exegesis of selected passages. Consideration is given to the relation of John to the Synoptic Gospels, to its special purpose and emphases, and its unique presentation of Christ.

NT 3409 – Acts of the Apostles (4 Semester Hours)

A study of the beginning and growth of the church during the apostolic age as presented in the book of Acts. This course shows the relationship between apostolic activity and the New Testament letters.

NT 3410 – Survey of the Life and Letters of Paul (4 Semester Hours)

A survey of the Apostle Paul’s work, teaching, and correspondence with young Christians and church leaders as recorded in the New Testament.

NT 4409 – Early Pauline Letters: I & II Thessalonians (4 Semester Hours)

An introduction to and study of the letters that Paul wrote to the church at Thessalonica. Special attention is given to issues relating to the second coming of Jesus Christ.

NT 4410 – Letters of Paul I: Romans and Galatians (4 Semester Hours)

An introduction to and study of Romans and Galatians. Attention is given to the Judaizing problem, the relation of the Old Testament to the New Testament, and the meaning and implications of justification by faith.

NT 4411 – Letters of Paul II: I & II Corinthians (4 Semester Hours)

An introduction to and study of I & II Corinthians. The course examines the way that Paul dealt with numerous spiritual and practical problems encountered by a young gentile church in a pagan environment.

NT 4412 – Letters of Paul III: Prison Epistles (4 Semester Hours)

An introduction to and study of Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, and Philemon. Special attention is given to the Christology and ethical teaching of these books and to the relationship between Ephesians and Colossians.

NT 4413 – Pastoral Epistles: I & II Timothy and Titus (4 Semester Hours)

An introduction to and study of the letters that Paul wrote to the evangelists Timothy and Titus. Special attention is given to issues relating to church organization.

NT 4414 – General Epistles (4 Semester Hours)

An introduction to and study of the book of Hebrews, giving special attention to the relation of the New Testament to the Old Testament and to the comparison of Christ with various Old Testament persons; and an introduction to and study of the epistles of James, Peter, Jude, and John, giving attention to the special theological issues and practical instruction of these letters.

NT 4415 – NT: Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, Philemon, I & II Timothy and Titus (4 Semester Hours)

An introduction to and study of Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, Philemon, Timothy and Titus. Special attention is given to the Christology and ethical teaching of these books and to the relationship between Ephesians and Colossians and to issues relating to church organization.

NT 4418 – NT: I & II Thessalonians and I & II Corinthians (4 Semester Hours)

An introduction to and study of I & II Thessalonians and I & II Corinthians. Special attention is given to issues relating to the second coming of Jesus Christ. Also, the course examines the way that Paul dealt with numerous spiritual and practical problems encountered by a young gentile church in a pagan environment.

NT 4422 – Revelation (4 Semester Hours)

An introduction to and study of the book of Revelation. Special attention is given to the nature of apocalyptic literature, methods of interpretation, and historical background of the book.

NT 4425 – Great Characters of the New Testament (4 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of the life, character, and influence of selected characters of the New Testament. Special attention is given to the encouragement to faithfulness demonstrated by the lives of righteousness exemplified in these characters.

NT 4427 – New Testament Life, Customs, and Times (4 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of the culture in which New Testament characters live. The political, social, economic and religious conditions are studied. Special attention is given to the cultural impact on the spiritual lives of various religious groups.

 

OM – ORGANIZATIONAL MANAGEMENT AND LEADERSHIP

OM 2405 – Adult Learning and Development (4 Semester Hours)

Adult learning theory and life cycle research is presented to promote understanding of self and group and individual behavior. Writing, reading, listening and thinking skills are sharpened as you work from an autobiographical assignment toward the experiential essay. Prepare a portfolio of personal and professional learning experiences that may be submitted for credit evaluation.

OM 2409 – Leadership and Organizational Dynamics (4 Semester Hours)

Human beings are social by nature and, as a result, spend much of their time in groups. On a large scale, group theory can be applied to the scope of organizations, where individuals join together to form a complex organizational structure. Students study both leadership theory and group behavior. The course incorporates processes and strategies leaders and followers use to gain consensus, make decisions and mobilize individuals to organizational effectiveness.

OM 3405 – Methods of Social Science Research (4 Semester Hours)

Introduction to research and its tools to tackle the research required in the program’s research seminars. Presents statistics as tools in solving real-world problems, data collection and analysis, problem evaluation and decision-making. Concepts studied are all related to work situations with a variety of techniques applicable to diverse types of data.

OM 3407 – Research Seminar I (4 Semester Hours)

An application of the tools and methodology presented in OM 3405. The student studies a real work problem, collects data, analyzes that data and formulates conclusions and then presents the results of the research to the class. The student will define the research problem and develop the research design.

OM 3409 – Business Ethics and Worldview (4 Semester Hours)

Introduces fundamental issues involved in relating personal ethical values to the complex moral dilemmas faced by managers. Beginning with a consideration of the relationship between values and worldviews, proceed to examine two different modes of ethical analysis and to explore problems associated with ethical relativism, professional ethics, conflicts of interest and corporate social responsibility.

OM 4405 – Cross-cultural Studies (4 Semester Hours)

Leveraging diversity is the major theme of this course with emphasis on empowering people to reach their full potential. It is organized around the three components of multiculturalism: the broadest concepts involved with global leadership; the particulars involved in local and workplace diversity; and the deepest aspects of how culture defines who we are as individuals. Crossing cultures means encountering hundreds of differences. Acknowledging the profound impact of identification with these “co-cultures” will be a springboard for personal growth.

OM 4407 – Human Resource Leadership (4 Semester Hours)

Effective leadership in human resources means the effective management and development of people at work. Explore what can be done to assist people in being more satisfied and productive in their working life. Covers topics such as staffing and fair employment practices, performance evaluation, compensation, training and development, corrective action and unionization.

OM 4409 – Research Seminar II (4 Semester Hours)

A continuation of the research project begun in OM 3407. The student will finalize and test their research measures, conduct a pilot study and engage in data collection for his or her final study.

OM 4411 – Personal Leadership for Change (4 Semester Hours)

Explores the many facets of leadership. Focuses on the processes by which people (leaders and followers) effect change internally and externally in a variety of situations. Develop insights, knowledge and thought processes about yourself and others. Class leadership and the development of a class community are essential to success in this course.

OM 4413 – Financial Environment of Organizations (4 Semester Hours)

Presents basic accounting and financial concepts and topics critical to every management situation. Focuses on the managerial understanding of accounting and finance as reflected in their relationship to each other, in financial statements and in how data in financial statements are used to evaluate, plan and control an organization. Be able to communicate more effectively with accountants and financial specialists.

OS – ORGANIZATIONAL SECURITY

OS 3411 – Principles of Asset Protection (4 Semester Hours)

Examines the spectrum of protective efforts required to safeguard public and private physical, personnel and information assets. Introduces students to the concepts of risk assessment and abatement; focusing specifically on the measures needed to mitigate threats to facilities, people and information. Physical security, protective service operations and information security efforts as well as emergency response and business continuity are explored.

OS 3415 – Risk Analysis and Security Survey (4 Semester Hours)

Students examine the application of security knowledge and techniques to the protection of business assets. The security planning process is examined by the study of risk analysis, security surveys, and financial planning and decision making for development of security programs and countermeasures.

OS 3420 – Emergency Decision Making and Problem Solving (4 Semester Hours)

Enables the student to clearly identify a problem and its causes in order to determine the appropriate type of decision making style. Focuses on a suggested process of problem solving providing students with the ability to apply creative solutions to both emergency and non-emergency situations.

OS 3425 – Physical Security (4 Semester Hours)

Addresses the basic principles of physical security, with emphasis on tailoring these principles to the protection of specific operations and facilities. In addition, students will learn the significance of proper planning, design, modern techniques, and devices that enhance security while reducing costs.

OS 3440 – Emergency Preparedness Planning for Corporations (4 Semester Hours)

This course will introduce the student to the concepts of strategic planning as applied to emergency preparedness. It is intended to make the student familiar with strategic planning, budgeting, implementation, and to provide the student with tools and techniques they can use in developing and implementing emergency preparedness programs.

OS 3460 – Security Systems and Technology (4 Semester Hours)

This course covers the basics of physical security from a systems engineering perspective, including the concepts of detection, delay, response, threats and targets of intruders. Case examples based on facility security are analyzed.

OS 4420 – Industrial Espionage (4 Semester Hours)

Industrial espionage results in millions of dollars in lost revenue each year. This course provides a brief history of the subject followed by specific topics. Material covered includes the role of governments in industrial espionage, methods of industrial espionage such as lasers, video cameras, electronic bugging devices, and binary or digital audio devices, countermeasures such as non-linear junction detection (NLJD) devices, and the hazards of email.

OS 4425 – Loss Prevention (4 Semester Hours)

Provides insight into the complex problems of loss prevention in today’s society including security staffing needs, fire protection and control, duties and responsibilities of security personnel, internal controls, emergency and disaster planning and internal theft.

OS 4450 – Business and Organization Security Overview (4 Semester Hours)

This course is designed as the culminating experience of the baccalaureate program in business and organization security. This course comprises a series of assignments that integrate concepts from the business and organization security curriculum. The assignments are designed to test application skills in working through fact-based scenarios as well as critical thinking skills through analysis of issues affecting contemporary practice.

Note: This is the Capstone Course for the Bachelor of Science in Public Safety and Business/Organization Security and should be taken only by students nearing completion of the Bachelor of Science in Public Safety and Business/Organization Security.

OS 4451 – Public Safety and Entity Security Overview (4 Semester Hours)

This course is designed as the culminating experience of the baccalaureate program in public safety and entity security. This course comprises a series of assignments that integrate concepts from the public safety and entity security curriculum. The assignments are designed to test application skills in working through fact-based scenarios as well as critical thinking skills through analysis of issues affecting contemporary practice.

 

OT – OLD TESTAMENT STUDIES

OT 3401 – Introduction and Survey of the Old Testament (4 Semester Hours)

An introduction to the Old Testament on the undergraduate level relative to its historical backgrounds, composition, canon, text, purpose, and message. Specific attention is given to the Old Testament’s inspiration, text, canon, and authority. This course is the basic course for this area. It is expected to be taken early in the program.

OT 3402 – The Pentateuch (4 Semester Hours)

An introduction to and survey of the first five books of the Bible, namely, Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy. This course will survey historical events from the creation through the patriarchs, the forming of the nation of Israel, the Egyptian bondage, the wilderness wanderings, and the giving of the Law of Moses. It also examines the legislation contained in these books.

OT 3403 – Joshua, Judges, Ruth (4 Semester Hours)

An introduction to and study of Joshua, Judges, and Ruth, which cover the Israelite conquest of Canaan and the period of rule by judges.

OT 3408 – I & II Samuel (4 Semester Hours)

An overview of the books of Samuel with historical and geographical contexts.

OT 3421 – Genesis and Exodus (4 Semester Hours)

A study of the first two books of the Old Testament. The course addresses the composition, contents, purpose, and background of the books. The relationships of these books to the other books of the Bible are explored.

OT 3425 – Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy (4 Semester Hours)

A study of the third, fourth and fifth books of Moses in the Old Testament. The course addresses the composition, contents, purpose, and background of the books. The relationships of these books to the other books of the Bible are explored.

OT 4410 – I & II Kings and I & II Chronicles (4 Semester Hours)

A study of the historical background, composition, and message of Kings and Chronicles with attention to the supplemental functions of the books.

OT 4412 – Harmony of Ezra, Nehemiah and Esther with Haggai, Zechariah and Malachi (4 Semester Hours)

A study of Ezra, Nehemiah, and Esther in conjunction with the post-exilic books of the prophets Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi. This course examines events and conditions connected with the return of the Jews from Babylonian captivity, their rebuilding of Jerusalem and the temple, and their struggle for survival.

OT 4415 – The Minor Prophets (4 Semester Hours)

An introduction to and study of each of the minor prophets, with emphasis on their historical background and chronological order. Attention is given to the rise of the writing prophets, the nature of their mission and the character of their message, including principles of interpreting prophesy.

OT 4417 – Isaiah and Micah (4 Semester Hours)

An introduction to and study of Isaiah and Micah with an emphasis on their historical background and Messianic prophecies.

OT 4418 – The Book of Jeremiah (4 Semester Hours)

An introduction to and study of Jeremiah with an emphasis on historical background and prophecies.

OT 4421 – Prophecies from Babylon (4 Semester Hours)

An introduction to and study of the books of Daniel and Ezekiel. Special attention is given to the nature of apocalyptic literature, to the interpretation of visions in the book of Daniel, and to the influence of Daniel on the New Testament. Attention is also given to the prophet Ezekiel’s efforts to keep the Jews faithful to God in the Babylonian captivity and to his vision of the return to Palestine and restoration of the temple.

OT 4423 – Wisdom and Devotional Writings (4 Semester Hours)

An introduction to wisdom literature and a study of Solomon’s writings: Proverbs, Ecclesiastes and the Song of Solomon. Attention is given to the interpretation of wisdom literature in general.

OT 4424 – Psalms (4 Semester Hours)

A study of the historical background, composition, and message of the Psalter with consideration to how these poems describe the piety of ancient Israel and how this piety corresponds to modern Christian piety.

OT 4425 – Great Characters of the Old Testament (4 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of the life, character, and influence of selected characters of the Old Testament. Special attention is given to the encouragement to faithfulness demonstrated by the lives of righteousness exemplified in these characters.

OT 4426 – Job (4 Semester Hours)

The major themes and contents of the book of Job are studied. The problem of theodicy as revealed in the book of Job is compared with the problem of theodicy today.

OT 4428 – The Book of Isaiah (4 Semester Hours)

A study of the historical background, composition, and message of Isaiah with attention to the messianic prophecies.

OT 4430 – Old Testament Types and Shadows (4 Semester Hours)

A study of the types and shadows of the Old Testament, which gives a better understanding of the New Testament.

 

PH – PHILOSOPHY

PH 1403 – Logic (4 Semester Hours)

A study of the principles and methods of correct reasoning. Topics include the obligation to reason properly, the need to expose false reasoning, the composition, and use of arguments, the law of rationality, syllogisms, forms of propositions, rules of validity, and compound propositions.

PH 3420 – Survey of the Bible (4 Semester Hours)

This course is an overview of the Old Testament and New Testament. Major events and characters are studied. Special attention is given to God’s relationship to man and his unfolding revelations.

PH 4401 – World Views: Islam, Humanism, Marxism, Christianity (4 Semester Hours)

A comparative survey of major world views such as Humanism, Marxism, and Christianity as each relates to such areas as theology, ethics, sociology, economics, and history.

PH 4410Medical Ethics (4 Semester Hours)

This study is an introduction to the ethical theory and moral issues in the field of medicine, especially when considered from the viewpoint of Christian ethical thinking. Topics under review will include health care delivery, physician-patient relations, patient rights, organ donation, treating the handicapped, sickness and health, abortion, euthanasia, suicide, genetic engineering, other issues related to birth and reproduction, and other issues related to death and dying.

 

 

PS – PROFESSIONAL STUDIES

PS 1415 – How to Study the Bible (4 Semester Hours)

A practical systematic approach to studying the bible. Topics include divisions of the bible, presenter of the message, audience of the message, setting of the message, figurative language, prophecies and history.

PS 3401 – Life and Work of a Minister (4 Semester Hours)

An introduction to the preacher’s responsibilities for the pulpit, personal work, funerals, weddings, dedications, and other special occasions, as well as personal finance and grooming. It also involves consideration of congregational relationships, especially those among elders, deacons, and members.

PS 3402 – Contemporary Communication (4 Semester Hours)

An introduction to the art of writing and public speaking. Attention is given to style, structure, and delivery of speeches.

PS 3405 – Christian Education in the Church (4 Semester Hours)

A study of the church seen as an educational institution with a program of teaching. Its organization, administration, curriculum, methods, and principles of development are studied.

PS 3406 – Personal Evangelism (4 Semester Hours)

Principles of reaching man with the gospel of Christ through personal evangelism. Various techniques are discussed. Consideration is given to the needs of man and how the gospel of Christ meets those needs.

PS 3408 – Christian Marriage and Family (4 Semester Hours)

An examination of factors in self-understanding and interpersonal relations. Changing roles of men and women and problems of marital adjustment are studied. A special emphasis is the biblical basis for marriage and how the church can contribute to meaningful family life.

PS 4401 – Homiletics (4 Semester Hours)

A study of the principles and methods of preparing and presenting sermons and lessons. Attention is given to understanding the different types of sermons, selection of a subject, gathering and organization of materials, use of rhetorical techniques, and development of skills in delivery. (Highly recommended for those preparing to preach.)

PS 4402 – Preaching and the Old Testament (4 Semester Hours)

A study of the principles and methods of preparing and presenting sermons and lessons using literature of the Old Testament.

PS 4403 – Preaching and the New Testament (4 Semester Hours)

A study of the principles and methods of preparing and presenting sermons and lessons using literature of the New Testament.

PS 4404 – Christian Worship (4 Semester Hours)

A study of worship described and exemplified in the Bible from Genesis through Revelation with an emphasis on New Testament worship. The course will address the question, “Has God provided a pattern of worship for those who seek to worship Him today?”

PS 4409 – Church Ministry and the Internet (4 Semester Hours)

A course designed to make the student cognizant of what is available on the Internet in Christian Resources, how to use them, and how to place meaningful resources representing the ministry and the church on the World Wide Web.

PS 4412 – Church Growth through Bible School Evangelism (4 Semester Hours)

An introduction to the principles, methods, and practices used among modern churches in winning and maturing new Christians through church and personal evangelism efforts.

PS 4414 – Leadership for Christian Service (4 Semester Hours)

This course helps students understand the characteristics of effective leaders in the workplace, home, church community, and society. How leaders create visions, and how they motivate employees to move the organization forward in today’s marketplace.

PS 4420 – Guided Research in Professional Studies (4 Semester Hours)

Upper-level undergraduate students may participate in the study of a special problem or area of interest in professional studies under appropriate supervision. Under the approval and guidance of an instructor, the project shall lead to the production of a fully-documented research paper or report.

 

PS 4421 Internship in Ministry (Undergraduate senior level) (4 Semester Hours)

This is a supervised working experience in a concentration of ministry for students in an undergraduate degree program.  A syllabus is to be developed by the University instructor in consultation with the student and the on-site supervisor and the.  The syllabus will specify the area of concentration for the internship and must require a report signed by the student and the on-site supervisor (electronic signature is acceptable).  The internship must involve a minimum of 400 hours of supervised work experience (paid or un-paid) in the concentration.  The on-site supervisor must be trained and approved by the University.  This course may be repeated for credit provided the areas of concentration are different. Allowable grades: P, IP, F. (960 points or above to pass) Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor (POI). 

 

 

PG – PSYCHOLOGY

PG 2401 – General Psychology (4 Semester Hours)

A survey of the study of behavior and mental processes, and how they are influenced.

PG 2405 – Developmental Psychology (4 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of the human being beginning from conception to old age, with an emphasis on understanding of the process by which people become someone different while remaining in many aspects the same. This process called human development exposes our inherited structures to a lifetime of experiences.

 

 

RS – RESEARCH

RS 2411 – Introduction to Statistics (4 Semester Hours)

Introduction to and application of basic statistics to decision making. Course includes descriptive statistical measures, probability, probability distributions, and estimation.

 

 

SC – SCIENCES

SC 1410 – Introduction to Life Sciences (4 Semester Hours)

This course explores the biological hierarchy of organization, emergent properties, the cellular basis of life, the correlation between structure and function, cellular order, reproduction, growth and development, energy utilization and response to the environment.

SC 1415 – Astronomy (4 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of the history and development of astronomy. Techniques of observation are explored. The solar, planetary, stellar, galactic, and cosmological aspects of astronomy are addressed.

SC 1420 – Physical Science (4 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of such topics as scientific methods, matter and energy, motion, light, relativity theory, the atom, nuclear power and processes and chemical reactions. Pollution, energy resources, medicines, and consumer goods will also be discussed.

SC 1425 – Introduction to the Natural Sciences (4 Semester Hours)

This course is designed to provide non-science majors with an introduction to physics, the physical sciences, chemistry and biology. The primary goal of this course is for the student to achieve a self-sustaining level of scientific literacy and learn how to discern information. Emphasis will be placed on the interactions between the sciences. Students will read, critically evaluate, discuss, explain, and apply scientific discoveries and how they impact our daily lives.

SC 2410 – People, Science and the Environment (4 Semester Hours)

This is a course which explores the interrelationship of human beings and their environments—both living and non-living. How science helps define and address problems that arise from these interactions is examined.

 

 

SP – SPEECH STUDIES

SP 1401 – Spanish I (4 Semester Hours)

An introduction to Basic Conversational Spanish designed to give

students basic communication proficiency in Spanish: reading, writing, speaking, listening and understanding. Each class builds around a dialogue presenting a realistic situation in a Spanish-speaking locale. Students are introduced to correct pronunciation of a dialogue, learn thematically arranged vocabulary, and get acquainted with major grammatical points covered in the dialogue. Usually Spanish and Latin American customs pertaining to the topic are discussed during the class session as well.

The mastery of the class's essential vocabulary and structures is tested in weekly quizzes and midterm and final exams. The reading and speaking proficiency is tested by oral assignments in class or via voice mail (including midterm and final exam).

SP 1402 – Spanish II (4 Semester Hours)

This course is a continuation of SP 1401, and is designed to give students full communication proficiency in Spanish: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students are introduced to the basic structures, language functions, and vocabulary groups of Spanish and are exposed to the diversified cultural contexts in which the language is spoken worldwide. Prerequisite: SP 1401.

SP 1403 – Spanish III (4 Semester Hours)

This course is a continuation of SP 1402, and is designed to give students full communication proficiency in Spanish: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students are introduced to the basic structures, language functions, and vocabulary groups of Spanish and are exposed to the diversified cultural contexts in which the language is spoken worldwide. Prerequisite: SP 1402.

SP 2401 – Fundamentals of Public Speaking (4 Semester Hours)

This course addresses the basic principles and techniques of speech including written organization and oral delivery. The student will learn a variety of speech techniques, structures, and deliveries including impromptu, extemporaneous, informative, persuasive, and entertaining speeches. The student will also participate in oral readings, analysis of speeches and analysis of audiences. This course is not designed to prepare ministers for sermon preparation or delivery.

 

 

SS – SOCIAL SCIENCES

SS 1405 – Latin America and the Caribbean (4 Semester Hours)

A study of the 20th Century political, economic, social, and cultural history of Latin America and the Caribbean. This course focuses on the key issues and events that are crucial to understanding the development of the modern-day Americas. Issues include the relationship of Latin America and the Caribbean to the rest of the world; the historical roots of regional tensions; national economics of the Americas; political instability, reform movements, and revolutions; impact of migration and urbanization; changing regional ethnic identities; evolving roles of women; religious upheaval; cultural/artistic movement; difficulties in maintaining national sovereignty; and the Latin American and Caribbean presence in the United States.

 

 

SY – SOCIOLOGY

SY 2401 – Introductory Sociology (4 Semester Hours)

An introduction to the study of sociological concepts, research techniques, and theories. The course deals with areas of sociology including collective behavior, sex roles, deviance, social class, and family.

SY 3415 – Sociology: Society in Focus (4 Semester Hours)

A course to study the history of the discipline to include Social Framework, Social Differentiation and Equality, Social Institutions and Social Change. This focus will assist students in critical thinking about social issues, concepts and methods of the sociological enterprise.

 

 

TH – THEOLOGICAL AND HISTORICAL STUDIES

TH 2405 – Biblical Theology (4 Semester Hours)

A survey of Christian doctrines with an overview of such subjects as: Bibliology, Theology, Angelology, Anthropology, Hamartiology, Christology, Soteriology, Ecclesiology, Pneumatology and Eschatology.

TH 2430 – The Scheme of Redemption (4 Semester Hours)

This course is an overview of the entire Bible with emphasis on the progressive revelation of the scheme of man redemption for mankind. The revelations and prophecies of the Old Testament that are related to the scheme of redemption are studied. The instructions, examples and prophecies of the New Testament that are related to the scheme of redemption are studied.

TH 2435 – Survey of Ecclesiastical History (4 Semester Hours)

This course is an overview of the background, establishment and growth of Christianity. The course addresses the contributions of Babylonia, Medo-Persia, Greek, and Rome to the preparation of the world for the Christ; the personal teachings of Christ; the teachings of the Apostles; the history and apostasy of the church; the reformation; and the restoration of the Church.

TH 3401 – Survey of Christian History and Thought (4 Semester Hours)

A survey of the church from its beginning to 1500 A.D. Attention is given to the organization, doctrine, and practice of the church in the New Testament; the struggle of the church with Judaism, paganism, and various heresies in the patristic period; the development of trends leading to Roman Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy; and early efforts at reformation.

TH 3402 – Introduction to Christian Theology (4 Semester Hours)

A survey of the Christian theology including the doctrines of God, man, and Christ to the doctrines of salvation and the church.

TH 3404 – Reformation and Modern Church History (4 Semester Hours)

A survey of history and theological development of Christianity from 1500 A.D. up to the present. Attention is given to the causes and leaders of the Reformation and to the rise of the various Protestant denominations.

TH 3420 – Christian Evidences (4 Semester Hours)

A study which presents an apologetic for the Christian faith in the context of modern and contemporary apologetic methods. Drawing from multiple disciplines, the case for the truth of Christianity is developed, argued, and defended in the context of modern and post-modern thought. Attention focuses on apologetic methodology, the arguments for the existence of God, the existential predicament, miracles and history, the resurrection of Jesus, and the inspiration of the Bible.

TH 3426 – Spirituality and Spiritual Formation (4 Semester Hours)

The definition, meaning, and purpose of spirituality. A study of the history of spirituality throughout the Christian era and ways to develop spiritual maturity in believers. Special emphasis will be given to spiritual disciplines and prayer from a biblical perspective.

TH 4405 – Systematic Theology (4 Semester Hours)

A survey of Christian doctrines with an overview of such subjects as: Bibliology, Theology, Angelology, Anthropology, Hamartiology, Christology, Soteriology, Ecclesiology, Pneumatology and Eschatology.

TH 4408 – Apologetics/Preaching in the Postmodern Period (4 Semester Hours)

An introduction to a Christian apologetic for confronting the unique challenges of postmodernism from the pulpit. It will balance an analysis of special, recent challenges to faith with a study of Biblical/theological norms undergirding a classical, evidentialist apologetic. Emphasis will be upon an exploration of ways in which preaching may be effective for the apologetic enterprise.

TH 4409 – Divine Authority (4 Semester Hours)

A study of specific authority or generic authority of what is essential or what is incidental as it relates to New Testament or Old Testament examples. The student should learn to discern the difference between generic and specific.

TH 4410 – Denominational Doctrines (4 Semester Hours)

A survey of selected denominations and some of their doctrines.

TH 4416 – Theism and Humanism (4 Semester Hours)

A study of modern humanism, its significance, its background, its philosophical forms and its entrenchment in our modern world. Methods by which humanism works in society are discussed, as are the consequences of humanism. Attention is given to how Christians can overcome humanism.

TH 4419 – Religious Teachings of the Old Testament (4 Semester Hours)

This course is an overview of the religious principles taught in the Old Testament. Primarily attention is given to the principal ideas presented in the unfolding of God’s scheme of redemption in the Old Testament. Principles studied include the nature of God, the nature of man, the nature of sin, God dealing with man, and God’s promise of redemption through Christ.

TH 4423 – History and Religion in the Hellenistic Age (4 Semester Hours)

A survey of Greco-Roman and Jewish history, culture, literature, and religions from the sixth century B.C. to the second century A.D.

TH 4425 – Design and Action of Baptism (4 Semester Hours)

A study of the biblical teachings and examples regarding Christian baptism.

TH 4430 – Justice of God and Man’s Redemption (4 Semester Hours)

A study of the Justice of God and His biblical mandate for justice, and the procedures and concepts that ultimately affect our current system of American jurisprudence.

GRADUATE AND DOCTORAL LEVEL COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

 

BI – BIBLICAL INSTRUCTION

BI 6320 – History of the Bible (3 Semester Hours)

A study of the ancient manuscripts of Hebrew and Greek of the Old and New Testament and their translation into Latin, German, English, French and other languages. The study will deal with the text and canon of both Testaments, textual criticisms, the Apocryphal books, and evaluate the English Bibles of the last seven centuries.

BI 6325 – Archaeology and the Bible (3 Semester Hours)

A study of archeological research and findings and their relationship to biblical facts and teachings. Emphasis will be given to accessing the validity and reliability of the research efforts and discoveries. More specifically, this is a study of excavated materials such as monuments, pottery, inscriptions, art, architecture, literature, and other artifacts, objects and items related to customs, language, or peoples. This course is designed to help the student to better understand the historical context of the Bible.

BI 7011 – Comprehensive Examination for Master of Arts in Biblical Studies (0 Semester Hours)

This is a non-credit written examination addressing a summary, analysis, synthesis and application of the topics, concepts, issues and principals associated with the Master of Arts in Biblical Studies. This examination is prepared by and graded by the faculty in the student’s program area. The examination is graded on a pass/fail basis. This is the exit examination for the program and must be passed for the student to receive the master’s degree.

BI 7012 – Comprehensive Examination for Master of Arts in Practical Ministry (0 Semester Hours)

This is a non-credit written examination addressing a summary, analysis, synthesis and application of the topics, concepts, issues and principals associated with the Master of Arts in Practical Ministry. This examination is prepared by and graded by the faculty in the student’s program area. The examination is graded on a pass/fail basis. This is the exit examination for the program and must be passed for the student to receive the master’s degree.

BI 7013 – Comprehensive Examination for Master of Arts in Theology and Historical Studies (0 Semester Hours)

This is a non-credit written examination addressing a summary, analysis, synthesis and application of the topics, concepts, issues and principals associated with the Master of Arts in Theology and Historical Studies. This examination is prepared by and graded by the faculty in the student’s program area. The examination is graded on a pass/fail basis. This is the exit examination for the program and must be passed for the student to receive the master’s degree.

BI 7014 – Comprehensive Examination for Master of Arts in Biblical Exposition (0 Semester Hours)

This is a non-credit written examination addressing a summary, analysis, synthesis and application of the topics, concepts, issues and principals associated with the Master of Arts in Biblical Exposition. This examination is prepared by and graded by the faculty in the student’s program area. The examination is graded on a pass/fail basis. This is the exit examination for the program and must be passed for the student to receive the master’s degree.

BI 7015 – Comprehensive Examination for Master of Divinity (0 Semester Hours)

This is a non-credit written examination addressing a summary, analysis, synthesis and application of the topics, concepts, issues and principals associated with the Master of Divinity. This examination is prepared by and graded by the faculty in the student’s program area. The examination is graded on a pass/fail basis. This is the exit examination for the program and must be passed for the student to receive the master’s degree.

CI – CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION

CI 6000 – Teaching and Facilitating via Distance Education at Amridge University (10 CEUs)

This course is targeted towards individuals who have expressed a desire to teach an online course and is required to become a member of the Amridge team. All current faculty and staff may participate. Designed for asynchronous delivery (approximately 100 clock hours), this course has three goals. Stressing a team-oriented atmosphere of sharing and constructive feedback, participates are exposed to adult learning theories, course planning and development, and university policies and procedures. The course is facilitated by one instructor with one or more “guest professors” voluntarily participating in discussions and feedback sessions.

CI 6200 – Teaching and Facilitating via Distance Education at Amridge University. (2 Semester Hours)

This course is targeted towards individuals who have expressed a desire to teach an online course and is required to become a member of the Amridge team. All current faculty and staff may participate. Designed for asynchronous delivery (approximately 100 clock hours), this course has three goals. Stressing a team-oriented atmosphere of sharing and constructive feedback, participates are exposed to adult learning theories, course planning and development, and university policies and procedures. The course is facilitated by one instructor with one or more “guest professors” voluntarily participating in discussions and feedback sessions.

CI 6310 – Course Planning (3 Semester Hours)

This course in basic course planning will address identifying and stating student learning outcomes; and, procedures for determining, organizing and sequencing learning experiences.

CI 6311 – Advanced Course Planning (3 Semester Hours)

This course in advanced course planning will address procedures for designing a course based on learning theory, program purpose, learning outcomes, student characteristics and course delivery format. Prerequisite: CI 6310.

CI 6315 – Course Management (3 Semester Hours)

This course will address ascertaining learning outcomes, assessment of the position of course in the program sequence, assignment of resources, student assignments, integration of technology, time management, communications with students and assessment of student outcomes.

CI 6320 – Course Assessment (3 Semester Hours)

This course will address the congruence of student assignments and desired student outcomes, the effective allocation of time and other resources, the reliability and validity of the assessment of student outcomes and the impact of the course on the total program.

CI 6340 – Program Planning (3 Semester Hours)

This course will address procedures for ascertaining program purpose, assessing program outcomes, designing the course sequence, assigning student outcomes to courses and, assessing the total program.

 

 

DM – DOCTOR OF MINISTRY STUDIES

DM 9051 – Qualifying Examination for Doctor of Ministry (0 Semester Hours)

This non-credit course is a written and oral examination addressing a summary, analysis, and synthesis of the Doctor of Ministry and an assessment of the student’s readiness for professional research and publishing. This examination is prepared and administered for the individual student by the student’s Faculty Advisory and other faculty members. This examination must be passed for the student to gain DMin Candidacy and to begin dissertation work. The written portion will include ten weeks of developing the dissertation proposal and preparing for the oral presentation.  The oral portion consists of a two day on campus presentation and defense of the dissertation proposal.

DM 9301 – Ministry in the DMin Setting (3 Semester Hours)

This course is the introductory course for the Doctor of Ministry program and must be taken within the first nine hours of the Doctor of Ministry program. The course focuses on the practice of ministry, in context of the student’s present ministry and work setting. This introductory course on the Ministry and the Church will provide (1) A reflection upon biblical emphasis of ministry; (2) A review of the world and its data as it relates to the minister and his ministry; (3) An identification and review of the various roles and functions of the minister; and (4) Academic direction to the student in making academic preparation to meet the challenges of this doctoral program. Special Note: There is a 5-day, on-campus attendance requirement for this course that will be scheduled by the course instructor.

DM 9302 – Ministry and Theology (3 Semester Hours)

This course develops a synthesis of the principles of hermeneutics, homiletics, and theology of the Old and New Testaments as they apply to preaching and teaching in the Christian community. The major themes of the Old and New Testaments are investigated from the historical perspective and related to the practice of ministry. Topics for consideration include biblical revelation and authority, the unity of the Bible, God, humanity, the relationship between God and humanity, and other biblical terms and imagery.

DM 9303 – Ministry and the Contemporary World (3 Semester Hours)

This course examines some of the methods by which ministry must be adaptable to the culture of today in order for it to succeed as the service it was designed to be. The methods will be analyzed, not only for their effectiveness, but also according to their theological and biblical basis. The methods to be examined will vary over time, but they may be drawn from any of the following types of ministries or others similar to them: small groups, family, music, worship, preaching, education, media, publishing, recreation, community service, outreach, inner-city, or any age-specific group such as children, teens, college, singles, and retirees.

DM 9304 – Ministry to Individuals and Families (3 Semester Hours)

This course explores avenues of service to individuals and the family unit, including counseling and support mechanisms. Topics covered include, but are not limited to, counseling (crisis, substance abuse, and marriage), home and family ministry, and ministry to individuals of various groups.

DM 9305 – The Ministry and Worship (3 Semester Hours)

The special aspects of worship are considered such as: prayer, singing, preaching, baptism, etc. Sermon planning and possibilities are explored and ample consideration is given to worship being in spirit and truth.

DM 9306 – The Minister and Preaching Christian Doctrine (3 Semester Hours)

The purpose of the course is to examine ways in which Bible-based doctrinal preaching can be used in today’s church. The following areas are explored: the minister as church theologian and the preparation of sermons on biblical and doctrinal themes that are grounded in Scripture. Various approaches to biblical doctrinal preaching are considered.

DM 9307 – The Ministry of Administration (3 Semester Hours)

Biblical and theological bases of the church are explored in their implications for church administration. Attention is given to crucial areas of church administration such as planning, church member relations, and healing of congregational conflicts. Seminar presentations, response papers, and major projects are required.

DM 9308 – Ministry and Controversial Issues (3 Semester Hours)

The course focuses on the relational side of controversial issues in the church, to cover the emotional and interpersonal dimensions that often hide on one side or the other of a sharp debate. Members of the class engage in theological analysis of issues in the church. This effort will help a minister to develop an approach that will facilitate a person’s emotional growth in dealing with difficult problems.

DM 9309 – The Minister’s Message of Salvation (3 Semester Hours)

This course highlights the essentials of the gospel message of Christ. Students examine Christ’s death and resurrection and his provision for salvation. A review is given of the message that the minister needs to provide to a lost generation. The salvation promise will be emphasized.

DM 9310 – The Prophets and Prophetic Ministry of the Church (3 Semester Hours)

The prophetic word and world are carefully examined to identify and clarify their prophetic relevance for the ministry of the church today. Special attention is devoted to New Testament passages which are rooted in the prophetic statements of the Old Testament. Effective ministers will learn to articulate the importance of these prophetic messages to the generations of the 21st century.

DM 9311 – The Minister and Missiology (3 Semester Hours)

This course provides advanced information and strategies for developing vibrant, productive servants in God’s ministry. This course addresses the urgent contemporary questions: What is the nature of the gospel? What is the nature of the Christian community? What is the mission of the Church in a holistic, integrative sense? What is the essence of contemporary society and how does it impact the Church and its mission? From this background the course will move to the scriptural mission of a local church and the congregation’s program in the light of the vast responsibility to carry the gospel of Christ to a lost world.

DM 9312 – Church Growth and Membership Development (3 Semester Hours)

This course is an investigation of strategies for the development of the church in numerical growth and spiritual strength through the twin avenues of evangelism and Christian maturation. It covers such topics as the analysis, theory, and strategy of various church growth trends, the role of ministry of education in the church, ways to develop servants and leaders, and various methods of evangelism such as local, friendship, cross-cultural, and foreign.

DM 9313 – The Minister and Leadership (3 Semester Hours)

Spiritual leadership is a necessity, and ministers must learn how spiritual leadership is necessary to motivate, strengthen, and revitalize the church. The student will review the leadership principles and Christian principles which should provide the student with the necessary tools and principles to be an effective spiritual leader.

DM 9314 – The Minister and Homiletics (3 Semester Hours)

Current homiletical literature is read and discussed in order to introduce the students to fresh, innovative approaches to preaching. Emphasis is placed on the following forms: story, confession, inductive, dramatic monologue, dialogue, images and pictures, and moves and structures. The writings and sermons of preachers are critically examined in terms of theory, practice, style, hermeneutics, and content.

DM 9323 – Ministry in the World of Science, Philosophy and Religion (3 Semester Hours)

The minister and the church face a complicated world of science, philosophy, and religion. The basic question of each and their inter-relationship will be covered in this course. Students will be challenged to delve deeper into all of these questions.

DM 9325 – Psychology of Grief, Death, and Dying (3 Semester Hours)

This is an advanced study of the dynamics of grief work. It includes advanced methods of caregiving for the dying and their families. The student will demonstrate a higher level of knowledge about palliative care and emotional understanding of the needs of hurting people.

DM 9327 – Psychology of Religion (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of how psychology is involved in the way we worship, interpret the rituals, and our religious experiences from childhood to adulthood.

 

 

DT – DOCTORAL MARRIAGE AND FAMILY THERAPY AND PROFESSIONAL COUNSELING STUDIES

DT 9051 – Comprehensive Examination for Doctor of Philosophy in Marriage and Family Therapy (0 Semester Hours)

This non-credit course is a written examination addressing a summary, analysis, and synthesis of the Doctor of Philosophy in Marriage and Family Therapy. This examination is prepared and conducted for the individual student by the student’s Graduate Committee. This examination must be passed for the student to gain PhD Candidacy and to begin dissertation work.

DT 9053 – Qualifying Examination for Doctor of Philosophy in Marriage and Family Therapy (0 Semester Hours)

This non-credit course is a written and oral examination addressing a summary, analysis, and synthesis of the Doctor of Philosophy in Marriage and Family Therapy and an assessment of the student’s readiness for professional research and publishing. This examination is prepared and administered for the individual student by the student’s Faculty Advisor and other faculty members. This examination must be passed for the student to gain PhD Candidacy and to begin dissertation work. The written portion will include ten weeks of developing the dissertation proposal and preparing for the oral presentation.  The oral portion consists of a two day on campus presentation and defense of the dissertation proposal.

DT 9054 – Qualifying Examination for Doctor of Philosophy in Professional Counseling (0 Semester Hours)

This non-credit course is a written and oral examination addressing a summary, analysis, and synthesis of the Doctor of Philosophy in Professional Counseling and an assessment of the student’s readiness for professional research and publishing. This examination is prepared and administered for the individual student by the student’s Faculty Advisor and other faculty members. This examination must be passed for the student to gain PhD Candidacy and to begin dissertation work. The written portion will include ten weeks of developing the dissertation proposal and preparing for the oral presentation.  The oral portion consists of a two day on campus presentation and defense of the dissertation proposal.

DT 9300 – Marriage and Family Therapy and Professional Counseling in the PhD Setting (3 Semester Hours)

This course enables the student to create a four-year learning plan for the successful completion of the PhD degree. Because this learning plan is foundational, this course must be taken before other courses in the program are attempted. Five elements constitute this course:

Personality Profile – Using the NEO-PI-R and MBTI, students will assess their relational strengths and growth areas. Students will apply this information to estimate how they will fit together as a group during their studies.

Systemic Investigation – Using personal history as a basis, students will analyze family of origin, cultural, gender, and biological influences on their professional development. Then using case material from their own practice, students will estimate similar factors on clients.

The Scientist-Practitioner Model – An examination of the epistemology of scientific knowledge and an application of modern and postmodern epistemologies to develop a personal model of therapy at the doctoral level.

Student Colloquium – Students will discriminate the systemic influences involved in their doctoral study – centripetal forces moving them away from their goal and centrifugal forces moving them toward their goal. Students will construct strategies to help them make the most of their assets and reduce or work around their liabilities.

Personal Learning Plan – Each student will create this plan of study by reflecting on the five modules and their concentration of study and their professional goals.

Prerequisites: FT 7336 and FT 7300 OR FT 7306. Special Note: There is a 5-day, on-campus attendance requirement for this course that will be scheduled by the course instructor.

DT 9303 – Integrative Models of Marriage and Family Therapy (3 Semester Hours)

This course is an in-depth study of the major theories, theorists, principles, and techniques of marriage and family therapy and how they relate to the professional application of therapy. The student will conduct a comprehensive investigation and evaluation of selected theories and theorists. The student will prepare, present, and defend a paper on the theoretical and practical application of the theory selected. Prerequisite: FT 7311.

DT 9306 – Synthesis of Counseling and Psychotherapy Theories (3 Semester Hours)

This course is an in-depth study of the various theories, principles, and techniques of counseling and their application to professional counseling settings. The student will conduct a comprehensive investigation and evaluation of selected theories and theorists. The student will prepare, present, and defend a paper on the theoretical and practical application of the theory selected. Prerequisite: FT 7310.

DT 9309 – Applied Adult Development (3 Semester Hours)

This course reviews theories of adult human development, death, individual and family system development, and normal and abnormal development. Consistent with their learning plan, students will examine in depth, using original resources to the extent possible, individual and family systems development. Prerequisite: FT 7320.

DT 9312 – Relational Sexual Therapy (3 Semester Hours)

This course examines models of sex therapy, with a special emphasis on intimacy-based models. Students will apply a foundational understanding of human sexual development to construct treatment plans for client cases which intervene in the systemic meanings of clients' sexuality. Prerequisite: FT 7321.

DT 9315 – Strategies to Reduce Marriage and Family Dysfunction (3 Semester Hours)

This course reviews foundational theories of Interpersonal and Family Dynamics through dating, courtship, and marriage. Students critique the various theories using material drawn from original sources to the extent possible, and, using currently available demographic data, estimate future patterns of marriage and family development. Based on these estimates, students will construct primary prevention strategies to reduce predicted levels of dysfunction. Prerequisite: FT 7321 or FT 7322.

DT 9318 – Systemic Interventions in Abusive Relationships (3 Semester Hours)

This course examines the causes of and therapeutic techniques used in abusive relationships including domestic violence, and sexual, verbal, and emotional abuse. The student will choose one kind of abuse, do an extensive research of the literature, and write a 30-page paper reviewing the literature and suggesting intervention strategies for this type of abuse. Prerequisite: FT 7332.

DT 9321 – Analysis of Substance Abuse Interventions (3 Semester Hours)

This course investigates socially destructive addictions, socially unacceptable addictions, treatment of and interventions for addictions, prevention of addictions, and psychopharmacological implications of addictions. This course is designed to meet standards for addictions training required for certification in addictions counseling. Prerequisite: FT 7332.

DT 9324 – Systems of Relational and Intrapsychic Diagnosis (3 Semester Hours)

Building on a working knowledge of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), this course examines systems of nosology of mental disorders, including systemic, biological, and behavioral. Students will analyze case material using appropriate nosological systems and provide appropriate treatment plans based on the diagnosis. Prerequisite: FT 7335.

DT 9327 – Consultation with Larger Systems (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of how systems go beyond the family to organizational, industrial, and military settings. A special focus of the course will be family based businesses. Students will develop methods of consulting with larger systems to assist organizational leaders to function more effectively. Prerequisite: FT 7326.

DT 9330 – Medical Family Therapy (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of how therapists can work with the family practice medical community to advance the wholeness of the family. Students will assess the effectiveness of the family in adapting to selected physical illnesses and interventions which can assist physical health care. In addition, students will analyze psychological issues for which families may seek physical health care and estimate how psychotherapeutic interventions may reduce the total cost of health care. Prerequisite: FT 7355.

DT 9332 – Counseling for Change (3 Semester Hours)

This course involves the student in assessing the issues involved with problem identification, problem solving, change enabling, and accountability in relationship to theoretical approaches to counseling. The student examines the systemic issues involved in interpersonal and organizational change and critically examines the existing research base in relationship to effective change processes in counseling, and marital, couple and family counseling and therapy.

DT 9336 – Quality Practice and Fiscal Systems (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of the business operations and fiscal systems associated with the running of private practices, HMOs, mental health organizations, managed care, or other types of offices and practices providing treatment to family therapy patients or clients. A major emphasis will include a quality management of client, patient, and customer service operations, computer programs and systems for patient or client records and third party billing. Also, instruction will be provided on the DSM-5 elements and the relationship to client or patient medical records and third party billing and multi-third party billing cascades. Prerequisite: FT 7335.

DT 9337 – Teaching Practicum (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of and practice of teaching/learning theory, methodology, and design appropriate for collegiate level instruction. Through research, presentations, collegial work, and evaluations, the student will develop professional identity, be equipped for the classroom, and begin the journey toward teaching higher education. The student will be involved in an actual teaching experience.

DT 9340 – History of Chaplaincy in the Armed Forces (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of the history of the chaplaincy in the U.S. Armed Forces, from its beginnings within the Continental Army and Navy to its current expressions. Students will examine the influence of each service's traditions on the form of chaplaincy that service embraces and estimate future directions of chaplaincy in the U.S. Armed Forces.

DT 9343 – Chaplaincy in Contingency Operations (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of how chaplains must operate in many environments. Students will place a special emphasis on the unique demands chaplains face during contingency operations through an in-depth examination of post-Vietnam experience. Students will develop systemic models for chaplain operation during future contingency operations.

DT 9346 – Chaplaincy and Religious Diversity (3 Semester Hours)

This course examines how chaplains are the protectors of the religious liberty of all members of the U.S. Armed Forces. Since chaplains also function as the commander's experts on religious issues, this course prepares students through an examination of religious traditions chaplains are likely to encounter, and a systemic evaluation of what accommodation might mean to the student's branch of the U.S. Armed Forces.

 

 

FD – FOUNDATIONS OF BIBLICAL STUDIES

FD 5001 – Language Refresher in Hebrew (0 Semester Hours)

This free, non-credit course is designed to assist individuals in reviving, refreshing or maintaining skills in and knowledge of the Hebrew language. Live presentations and recorded materials will be provided. The student will speak directly to the teacher via phone conference calls. The teacher will respond to questions and will provide guidance to the participants.

FD 5003 – Language Refresher in Greek (0 Semester Hours)

This free, non-credit course is designed to assist individuals in reviving, refreshing or maintaining skills in and knowledge of the Greek language. Live presentations and recorded materials will be provided. The student will speak directly to the teacher via phone conference calls. The teacher will respond to questions and will provide guidance to the participants.

FD 5005 – Language Refresher in Latin (0 Semester Hours)

This free, non-credit course is designed to assist individuals in reviving, refreshing or maintaining skills in and knowledge of the Latin language. Live presentations and recorded materials will be provided. The student will speak directly to the teacher via phone conference calls. The teacher will respond to questions and will provide guidance to the participants.

FD 5007 – Language Refresher in German (0 Semester Hours)

This free, non-credit course is designed to assist individuals in reviving, refreshing or maintaining skills in and knowledge of the German language. Live presentations and recorded materials will be provided. The student will speak directly to the teacher via phone conference calls. The teacher will respond to questions and will provide guidance to the participants.

FD 6301 – Classical Syriac I (3 Semester Hours)

A study of the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of classical Syriac, a branch of the Aramaic language family. The course involves reading Syriac portions of the Old Testament and New Testament. Prerequisite: FD 6330.

FD 6302 – Elementary Greek I (3 Semester Hours)

A study of the grammar, syntax, and basic vocabulary of the Greek of the New Testament.

FD 6303 – Elementary Greek II (3 Semester Hours)

A continuation of FD 6302. A study of the grammar, syntax, and basic vocabulary of the Greek of the New Testament. Prerequisite: FD 6302.

FD 6304 – Greek Reading I (3 Semester Hours)

This course is designed to improve the students’ knowledge of Greek grammar and vocabulary and includes a thorough review of basic vocabulary and morphology. The course introduces intermediate syntax and exegesis. Textual portions will be selected by the instructor to address texts not previously addressed by the student. Prerequisites: FD 6303 and Permission of Instructor (POI).

FD 6305 – Greek Reading II (3 Semester Hours)

A continuation of FD 6304. This course is designed to improve the students’ knowledge of Greek grammar and vocabulary, and to further knowledge of the principles of advanced New Testament textual criticism and exegesis. Textual portions will be selected by the instructor to address texts not previously addressed by the student. Prerequisites: FD 6303 and Permission of Instructor (POI).

FD 6306 – Elementary Hebrew I (3 Semester Hours)

A study of the grammar, syntax, and basic vocabulary of the Hebrew of the Old Testament.

FD 6307 – Elementary Hebrew II (3 Semester Hours)

A continuation of FD 6306. A study of the grammar, syntax, and basic vocabulary of the Hebrew of the Old Testament. Prerequisite: FD 6306.

FD 6308 – Hebrew Reading I (3 Semester Hours)

A course developing skills in reading selected portions of the Hebrew Old Testament. It is designed to build vocabulary, develop knowledge of grammar and syntax, and introduce principles of textual criticism and exegesis. Textual portions will be selected by the instructor to address text not previously addressed by the student. Prerequisites: FD 6307 and Permission of Instructor (POI).

FD 6309 – Hebrew Reading II (3 Semester Hours)

A course developing skills in reading selected portions of the Hebrew Old Testament. It is designed to build vocabulary, develop knowledge of grammar and syntax, and give attention to principles of textual criticism and exegesis. Textual portions will be selected by the instructor to address text not previously addressed by the student. Prerequisites: FD 6307 and Permission of Instructor (POI).

FD 6310 – Ancient Near Eastern History and Religion (3 Semester Hours)

A survey of the history, literature, and religions of the ancient Near East from the fourth millennium B.C. to the fourth century B.C. This course involves the comprehensive reading of extra-biblical material in order to understand the political, literary, and cultural background of the Old Testament.

FD 6311 – History and Religion of the Hellenistic Age (3 Semester Hours)

A survey of Greco-Roman and Jewish history, culture, literature, and religion from the fourth century B.C. to the second century A.D. This course serves as a background for understanding the political, literary, and cultural setting of the New Testament.

FD 6312 – Hermeneutics (3 Semester Hours)

An advanced course in the principles, methods, and history of biblical interpretation.

FD 6313 – Advanced Greek I (3 Semester Hours)

An advanced course in the grammar and syntax of the Greek language. Prerequisite: FD 6303.

FD 6314 – Advanced Greek II (3 Semester Hours)

A continuation of FD 6313. An advanced course in the grammar and syntax of the Greek language. Prerequisite: FD 6313.

FD 6315 – General Biblical Introduction (3 Semester Hours)

A study of the revelation, canonization, transmission, and translation of the Bible.

FD 6317 – Greek Reading III (3 Semester Hours)

This course is designed to improve the students’ knowledge of Greek grammar and vocabulary, and to study the advanced principles of New Testament grammar and exegesis reading New Testament authors employing more advanced Greek. Textual portions will be selected by the instructor to address texts not previously addressed by the student. Prerequisites: FD 6303 and Permission of Instructor (POI).

FD 6318 – Greek Reading IV (3 Semester Hours)

This course is designed to improve the students’ knowledge of Greek grammar and vocabulary, and to study the advanced principles of New Testament grammar and exegesis reading New Testament authors employing more advanced Greek. Textual portions will be selected by the instructor to address texts not previously addressed by the student. Prerequisites: FD 6303 and Permission of Instructor (POI).

FD 6320 – German Grammar I (3 Semester Hours)

A study of German grammar, syntax, and vocabulary to prepare students to read scholarly literature in biblical studies and theology.

FD 6321 – German Grammar II (3 Semester Hours)

A continuation of FD 6320. A study of German grammar, syntax, and vocabulary to prepare students to read scholarly literature in biblical studies and theology. Prerequisite: FD 6320.

FD 6324 – Spanish Grammar I (3 Semester Hours)

An introduction to Basic Conversational Spanish designed to give students basic communication proficiency in Spanish: reading, writing, speaking, listening and understanding. Each class builds around a dialogue presenting a realistic situation in a Spanish-speaking locale. Students are introduced to correct pronunciation of a dialogue, learn thematically arranged vocabulary, and get acquainted with major grammatical points covered in the dialogue.

FD 6325 – Spanish Grammar II (3 Semester Hours)

A continuation of FD 6324 designed to give students full communication proficiency in Spanish: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students are introduced to the basic structures, language functions, and vocabulary groups of the Spanish language. Prerequisite: FD 6324.

FD 6326 – French Grammar I (3 Semester Hours)

An introduction to Basic Conversational French designed to give students basic communication proficiency in French reading, writing, speaking, listening and understanding. Each class builds around a dialogue presenting a realistic situation in a French-speaking locale. Students are introduced to correct pronunciation of a dialogue, learn thematically arranged vocabulary, and get acquainted with major grammatical points covered in the dialogue.

FD 6327 – French Grammar II (3 Semester Hours)

A continuation of FD 6326 designed to give students full communication proficiency in French: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students are introduced to the basic structures, language functions, and vocabulary groups of the French language. Prerequisite: FD 6326.

FD 6328 – French Reading (3 Semester Hours)

A survey course developing skills in reading the French language. The course builds vocabulary, expands knowledge of grammar and syntax, and develops comprehension of the language. Prerequisites: FD 6327 and Permission of Instructor (POI).

FD 6329 – Spanish Reading (3 Semester Hours)

A survey course developing skills in reading Spanish language. The course builds vocabulary, expands knowledge of grammar and syntax, and develops comprehension of the language. Prerequisites: FD 6325 and Permission of Instructor (POI).

FD 6330 – Biblical Aramaic (3 Semester Hours)

A study of the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of Biblical Aramaic. The course involves reading Aramaic portions of the Old Testament. Prerequisite: FD 6309.

FD 6331 – German Reading (3 Semester Hours)

A survey course developing skills in reading German. The course builds vocabulary, expands knowledge of grammar and syntax, and develops comprehension of the language. Prerequisites: FD 6321 and Permission of Instructor (POI).

FD 6336 – Classical Syriac II (3 Semester Hours)

A study of the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of classical Syriac, a branch of the Aramaic language family. The course involves reading Syriac portions of the Old Testament and New Testament. Prerequisite: FD 6301.

FD 6340 – Logic (3 Semester Hours)

A study of the principles of logic and an examination of techniques for determining the validity of arguments. It includes discussion of informal fallacies, Aristotelian logic, and symbolic logic.

FD 6341 – Akkadian Grammar I (3 Semester Hours)

A study of the grammar, syntax, and basic vocabulary of the Akkadian language.

FD 6342 – Akkadian Grammar II (3 Semester Hours)

A continuation of FD 6341. A study of the grammar, syntax, and basic vocabulary of the Akkadian language. Prerequisite: FD 6341.

FD 6344 – Akkadian Reading (3 Semester Hours)

A survey course developing skills in reading Akkadian. The course builds vocabulary, expands knowledge of grammar and syntax, and develops comprehension of the language. Prerequisites: FD 6342 and Permission of Instructor (POI).

FD 6345 – Hieroglyphs (3 Semester Hours)

A study of the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of the picture script writing of ancient Egypt. The course involves reading hieroglyphic texts and inscriptions.

FD 6350 – Hebrew Reading III (3 Semester Hours)

A course developing skills in reading selected portions of the Hebrew Old Testament. It is designed to build vocabulary, develop knowledge of grammar and syntax, and give attention to principles of textual criticism and exegesis. Textual portions will be selected by the instructor to address texts not previously address by the student. Prerequisites: FD 6307 and Permission of Instructor (POI).

FD 6353 – Hebrew Reading IV (3 Semester Hours)

A course developing skills in reading selected portions of the Hebrew Old Testament. It is designed to build vocabulary, develop knowledge of grammar and syntax, and give attention to principles of textual criticism and exegesis. Textual portions will be selected by the instructor to address texts not previously address by the student. Prerequisites: FD 6307 and Permission of Instructor (POI).

FD 6355 – Latin Grammar I (3 Semester Hours)

A study of Latin grammar, syntax, and vocabulary to prepare students to read scholarly literature in biblical studies and theology.

FD 6356 – Latin Grammar II (3 Semester Hours)

A continuation of FD 6355. A study of Latin grammar, syntax, and vocabulary to prepare students to read scholarly literature in biblical studies and theology. Prerequisite: FD 6355.

FD 6357 – Latin Reading I (3 Semester Hours)

Survey reading in traditional Latin prose and poetry authors, including historians Tacitus and Seutonius, and poets Ovid, Virgil, and Catullus. Designed to enable students to research original texts which might serve as background resources for the history, literature and culture of the period of Early Christianity. Prerequisites: FD 6356 and Permission of Instructor (POI).

FD 6358 – Latin Reading II (3 Semester Hours)

Survey reading in traditional Latin prose and poetry authors, including historians Tacitus and Seutonius, and poets Ovid, Virgil, and Catullus. Designed to enable students to research original texts which might serve as background resources for the history, literature and culture of the period of Early Christianity. This is a continuation of FD 6357. Prerequisites: FD 6357 and Permission of Instructor (POI).

FD 6360 – Elementary Hebrew and Greek for Christian Ministry (3 Semester Hours)

This is a basic course in the use of biblical Hebrew and Greek and biblical language study tools in Christian ministry. This class is designed for the student who does not plan to concentrate in biblical language study, but who needs a practical working knowledge of some elementary skills in order to enhance ministry and service.

FD 6361 – Hebrew Word Study (3 Semester Hours)

An individualized study of the etymology, meaning, and translation of the most important words in the Hebrew Bible. Under the supervision of the course instructor the student will examine all the key vocabulary of the Old Testament in the original Hebrew language and will compare and evaluate how these terms have been translated by the major versions (Greek, Latin, and English) of the Bible.

FD 6362 – Greek Word Study (3 Semester Hours)

An individualized study of the etymology, meaning, and translation of the most important words in the Greek New Testament. Under the supervision of the course instructor the student will examine all the key vocabulary of the New Testament in the original Greek language and will compare and evaluate how these terms have been translated by the major versions of the Bible (Syriac, Latin, and English) of the Bible. Prerequisite: FD 6361.

FD 7320 – Guided Research in Foundation Studies (3 Semester Hours)

An independent study of a special area in which the student is interested. This course is restricted to students with advanced preparation in Biblical Foundations and requires the writing of a fully-documented research paper under the guidance of an instructor.

FD 7322 – Synthesis of Theological Curriculum I (3 Semester Hours)

A course designed to prepare Master of Arts students to take the comprehensive examination. Under the guidance of the faculty, the student is encouraged to synthesize the knowledge gained from the various courses and to express these concepts in his own words.

Note: This is a Capstone Course and should be taken only by students nearing completion of the Master of Arts in Biblical Studies or Master of Arts in Practical Theology.

FD 7323 – Synthesis of Theological Curriculum II (3 Semester Hours)

A course designed to prepare Master of Divinity students to take the comprehensive examination. Under the guidance of the faculty, the student is encouraged to synthesize the knowledge gained from the various courses and to express these concepts in his own words.

Note: This is a Capstone Course and should be taken only by students nearing completion of the Master of Divinity or Master of Divinity in Ministerial Leadership or Master of Divinity in Marriage and Family Therapy or Master of Divinity in Pastoral Counseling or Master of Divinity in Professional Counseling.

FD 9001 – Proficiency Examination of the Biblical Hebrew Language (0 Semester Hours)

This non-credit course is a written and oral examination of the Hebrew language to document that the individual has sufficient language skills to read and conduct exegesis of documents in the original biblical Hebrew language.

FD 9002 – Proficiency Examination of the Biblical Greek Language (0 Semester Hours)

This non-credit course is a written and oral examination of the Greek language to document that the individual has sufficient language skills to read and conduct exegesis of documents in the original biblical Greek language.

FD 9003 – Proficiency Examination of the Latin Language (0 Semester Hours)

This non-credit course is a written and oral examination of the Latin language to document that the individual has sufficient language skills to read documents in the Latin language.

FD 9006 – Proficiency Examination of the German Language (0 Semester Hours)

This non-credit course is a written and oral examination of the German language to document that the individual has sufficient language skills to read documents in the German language.

FD 9007 – Proficiency Examination of the French Language (0 Semester Hours)

This non-credit course is a written and oral examination of the French language to document that the individual has sufficient language skills to read documents in the French language.

FD 9008 – Proficiency Examination of the Aramaic Language (0 Semester Hours)

This non-credit course is a written and oral examination of the Aramaic language to document that the individual has sufficient language skills to read and conduct exegesis of documents in the original Aramaic language.

FD 9009 – Proficiency Examination of the Akkadian Language (0 Semester Hours)

This non-credit course is a written and oral examination of the Akkadian language to document that the individual has sufficient language skills to read and conduct exegesis of documents in the original Akkadian language.

FD 9051 – Qualifying Examination for Doctor of Philosophy in Biblical Studies (0 Semester Hours)

This non-credit course is a written and oral examination addressing a summary, analysis, and synthesis of the Doctor of Philosophy in Biblical Studies with emphasis in the chosen area of concentration and an assessment of the student’s readiness for professional research and publishing. This examination is prepared and conducted for the individual student by the student’s Graduate Committee. This examination must be passed for the student to gain PhD Candidacy and to begin dissertation work. The written portion will include ten weeks of developing the dissertation proposal and preparing for the oral presentation and examination.  The oral portion consists of a two day on campus presentation and defense of the dissertation proposal.

FD 9300 – Research in Biblical Doctrine (3 Semester Hours)

This course provides an overview of the PhD in Biblical Studies program. In this course the student will initiate a self study and personal analysis of the great doctrines from God using the terminology of the original language. The student will research, authenticate, and endorse or reject a belief in three or more of the following biblical doctrines: God, Christ, the Holy Spirit, the inspiration and authority of the Bible, humanity and sin, redemption and salvation, the church, and last things. Special emphasis should be given to the various sub-doctrines of the selected doctrines in the paper thereby giving a full treatment of the chosen topics. Notice: This Biblical Doctrines Position Paper must be expanded and developed throughout the student’s study in the PhD Degree Program in Biblical Studies. The final version of the student’s Biblical Doctrines Position Paper must be presented, defended and passed at the occasion of the Student’s Doctoral Dissertation defense as part of RB Research Dissertation in Biblical Studies Module IV.

FD 9305 – Research Analysis of the Origin and History of the Bible (Core) (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a critical analysis of the origin, development, canonization, transmission, and preservation of the Bible. It is research oriented in order to prepare the student to understand the difficulties and problems associated with the field. The course is composed of seven units: (1) the development of writing and writing materials; (2) a brief overview of the characteristics of Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek; (3) an analysis of “autographs;” manuscripts, and ancient versions, as well as the overall process of text transmission; (4) an evaluation of the more important views of inspiration and canonization; (5) a study of the science of textual criticism; (6) an introduction to the science of translating; and (7) the history and evaluation of translations of the English Bible from earliest times until the present.

FD 9310 – Historical and Archaeological Research of the New Testament (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a detailed analysis of the Judaistic and Hellenistic backgrounds of the New Testament period. Part of the course will be allotted to a survey of the Jewish apocryphal and pseudepigraphical writings which are relevant for the understanding of the New Testament and its cultural and religious background. A major part of the course will be devoted to an intensive study of the history and geography of Palestine with primary emphasis upon their relationship to the lives of Jesus and the apostles. A significant portion of the course will be devoted to an investigation of the most important historical and archaeological sites mentioned in the Gospels and Acts. Other key topics which will be covered include the Dead Sea Scrolls, Jewish writers (Philo, Josephus, and leading rabbis), and the rise of the Roman Empire. (New Testament emphasis)

FD 9312 – Research Methods of Old Testament Criticism (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of the history of Old Testament criticism, with an emphasis on the more recent developments in contemporary and traditional biblical scholarship. The course is research oriented in order to prepare the student to understand the difficulties and problems associated with both the traditional approach and modern critical approaches. The study will give careful attention to the early tradition regarding Mosaic authorship of the Pentateuch, and then study other claims (source criticism-also known as the Documentary Hypothesis; form criticism; redaction criticism; oral tradition – also known as tradition criticism; canonical criticism; and literary criticism). The course will include the study of selected topics beyond the Pentateuch. Several of the topics are listed here: (1) chronology; (2) the conquest of Canaan; (3) Deuteronomistic History; (4) the historicity of Samuel and Kings; (5) textual problems; and (6) alleged contradictions. The course is also designed to aid the student in confronting significant interpretive problems. The student will be introduced to a wide variety of Near Eastern literature and will be trained to make critical comparisons with the Old Testament. (Old Testament emphasis)

FD 9318 – Research Methods of New Testament Criticism (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of the history of New Testament criticism, with an emphasis on the more recent developments in contemporary and traditional biblical scholarship. The course is research oriented in order to prepare the student to understand the difficulties and problems associated with both the traditional and modern critical approaches to the New Testament. The study will give careful attention to the following topics: (1) New Testament chronology; (2) the literary form of each Gospel; (3) authorship of several books; (4) the historicity of Acts; (5) the original language of each Gospel; (6) alleged contradictions; (7) textual problems; (8) the “Synoptic Problem;” and (9) authenticity of some epistles. The course is also designed to aid the student in confronting these and other significant problems. The student will be introduced to a wide variety of available literature from this period and will be trained to make critical comparisons with the appropriate passages in the New Testament.

FD 9350 – Historical and Archaeological Research of the Old Testament (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a detailed study of the civilizations and culture of the ancient Near East from the Early Bronze Age to the end of the Iron Age. The purpose of the course is to provide the milieu of the books of the Hebrew Bible so that each book may be more easily understood and more accurately interpreted. Attention will be given to the socio-cultural reconstruction of each period and the relevance of the historical and archaeological discoveries to an understanding of the patriarchal narratives, the conquest of Palestine, the monarchy, and the period covering the exile and return. This course examines the history, literature, and artifacts of the so-called Bible Lands, with emphasis upon its contribution to exegesis. The course involves a comprehensive reading of extra-biblical material in order to master the subject. (Old Testament emphasis).

FD 9353 – Biblical Etymology and Exegesis (3 Semester Hours)

This is a study of the etymology and contextual meaning of the most important theological words and idioms in the Hebrew and Greek scriptures. Attention is given to the history of the translation of key words and difficult idioms. The student will be expected to do original research on selected terminology and to produce a series of short papers, as well as have a mastery of all Old Testament and New Testament vocabulary occurring ten times or more. The course will devote a considerable amount of time to the study of advanced grammar and exegetical principles, and the student will be required to submit a written exegesis of several passages selected by the course instructor(s).

 

 

FT – FAMILY THERAPY

FT 7300 – Ethics and Professional Identity (3 Semester Hours)

A study of Marriage and Family Therapy as a profession, this course introduces the AAMFT Code of Ethics with current ethical issues now facing the profession. Students are encouraged to develop professional goals and objectives. The MFT accrediting body (COAMFTE), organizations, associations (AAMFT and ALAMFT and other relevant state, regional, and national associations), as well as credentialing and licensure boards (ABEMFT and boards in other states, when relevant) are identified and their benefits explained.

FT 7301 – Introduction to Pastoral Counseling (3 Semester Hours)

A study of the history and development of Christian counseling. It explores the unique techniques used in pastoral counseling.

FT 7302 – Professional Ethics and the Law (3 Semester Hours)

A study of the ethical and legal environment relevant to therapy. Current legal issues and recent court cases will be considered, with an emphasis on developing a clinical practice which makes appropriate use of ethical and legal resources to provide quality care for clients.

FT 7304 – Premarital/Remarital Counseling (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a topical seminar designed to introduce the student to the concepts, various models, resources, and processes for leading couples through premarital and remarital preparation. Individual sessions of each counseling session will be explored and students will learn how to conduct the sessions. The student will become familiar with the theological issues as well as the practical implications of having a Christian marriage and family in today's society.

FT 7306 – Community and Social Systems (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of the theory, history, and process of community-based human service agencies with emphasis on preventive and educational models of therapy and counseling. Students will apply fundamental systemic principles to consultations with larger systems such as private and governmental agencies.

FT 7310 – Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of various theories, principles, and techniques of psychotherapy and how they are used in the clinical setting. A special emphasis is placed on each student’s development and articulation of a personal theory of counseling grounded in the systems in which the student anticipates working after graduation.

FT 7311 – Theories of Marriage and Family Therapy (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a study and evaluation of the major theories, theorists, principles, and techniques of marriage and family therapy and how they relate to the professional application of marriage and family therapy.

FT 7317 – Ministerial Counseling with Children and Adolescents (3 Semester Hours)

This course explores child and adolescent development, counseling theories, counseling strategies and interventions methodologies from a ministerial counseling perspective. There is a focus on working with individual children and adolescents, as well as the treatment of children and adolescents within the family system.

FT 7320 – Human Development (3 Semester Hours)

This course provides a broad understanding of human development across the life-span, including both normal and abnormal development. Human development is placed in the context of the systems which nurture or interfere with that development.

FT 7321 – Human Sexual Development (3 Semester Hours)

This course is designed to provide a comprehensive overview of both theoretical and clinical aspects of human sexual behavior. The broad scope of human sexual development and behaviors will be studied, examining research and theory about typical and atypical sexual behaviors. The course focuses on psychological and socio-cultural influences on human sexuality and incorporates a multi-disciplinary life-span approach to learning. The clinical assessment and treatment of sexual dysfunctions will also be introduced.

FT 7322 – Theories of Personality Development (3 Semester Hours)

A study of the theories and research on personality and its contributions to understanding human growth and development. Examination of the influence of family and interpersonal factors on the development, maintenance, and interventions in the area of personality is the focus of this study.

FT 7323 – Marriage and Family Development (3 Semester Hours)

This course uses theoretical approaches to and current research on dating, courtship, and marriage to study development and changes in family systems and relationships across the life span.

FT 7326 – Social and Multicultural Diversity (3 Semester Hours)

This course is designed to investigate the systemic impact of subgroup membership on families and other relationships, and how these subgroups in turn affect the larger cultural system. Included in this study are the recursive repercussions of discrimination. The second major component of the course, which is infused throughout, is a study of methods of doing therapy with diverse cultures.

FT 7327 – Psychology of Religion (3 Semester Hours)

A study of how psychology is involved in the way we worship, interpret the rituals, and our religious experiences from childhood to adulthood.

FT 7330 – Interpersonal and Family Dynamics (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of the major approaches to interpersonal dynamics in both family and group therapy. Similarities and differences between therapy with families and other groups are a major focus of this course.

FT 7331 – Marital and Family Systems (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of major systemic theories on family formation, and how styles of family formation affect personality development within the family system. Students will apply these theoretical underpinnings to the professional practice of counseling or therapy.

FT 7332 – Counseling for Abusive Relationships (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of the systemic causes of abusive relationships including: domestic violence, sexual, verbal, and emotional abuse. A special emphasis is placed on appropriate therapeutic techniques for each type of abuse under study.

FT 7333 – Systemic Treatment of Substance Related Disorders (3 Semester Hours)

This course addresses the treatment of substance related disorders from a systemic perspective. Emphasis will be placed upon the assessment and treatment of substance related disorders utilizing historical and contemporary models of treatment. A special focus will be placed upon the research that has been generated on the efficacy of family based models of treatment.

FT 7334 – Psychology of Grief, Death, and Dying (3 Semester Hours)

This study examines the dynamics of grief work. It includes methods of giving care to individuals who are terminally ill and their families and to the survivors of the death of a significant person.

FT 7335 – Advanced Therapy (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of DSM-5 diagnosis in a biopsychosocial context and of treatment modalities and techniques with a relational emphasis. Students will learn how to use the DSM-5 to make a diagnosis and assessment and how to apply various theories of therapy and counseling to the diagnosed disorder.

Note: This is a Capstone Course and should be taken only by students nearing completion of the Master of Arts in Professional Counseling or the Master of Arts in Marriage and Family Therapy. Prerequisite: FT 7336.

FT 7336 – Basic Counseling Techniques/Helping Relationships (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of basic methods of conducting counseling and therapy with families, couples, and individuals. Using case material, students learn and practice techniques from selected individually-focused and systems-focused therapy models. This course provides students with essential skills they will require during their clinical training courses.

FT 7337 – Group Counseling (3 Semester Hours)

This course examines both the theory and practice of group counseling. Students will explore theories of group counseling and group dynamics, with an emphasis upon developing skills in conducting group sessions.

FT 7340 – Assessment of Individuals and Families (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a study that provides experiential learning in the use of psychometric instruments and their application to assessing couples, families, and individuals. Topics include the ethics of testing and the place of assessment in a systemic intervention with clients. This course meets the requirements for certifying students in the use of instruments such as the PREPARE/ENRICH series and the Taylor-Johnson Temperament Analysis.

FT 7355 – Psychopathology and Psychopharmacology (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of the neurobiological foundations of psychopathology and some of the pharmacological interventions which may be prescribed as part of a systemic treatment of psychopathology. Students will understand how “talk therapy” produces physiological changes in the brain and apply their basic understanding of neurobiological systems to treating relational systems.

FT 7370 – MFT Practicum (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of the actual practice of therapy under supervision. Marriage and family therapy students begin their work toward 500 hours of client contact supervised by 100 hours of supervision of that work with an Approved Supervisor. NOTE: All Practicum and Clinical Training courses require face-to-face on-site clinical practice with the client(s). The experience must be performed under face-to-face supervision of an approved licensed supervisor. This experience should be conducted in the state in which the student will seek licensure. Prerequisite: FT 7335.

FT 7371 – MFT Clinical Training I (3 Semester Hours)

This course requires student interns to work in a therapeutic setting under an Approved Supervisor. MFT students will continue to build their 500 client contact hours and one hundred (100) hours of supervision. At least one-half of their client contact hours will be with couples or families. NOTE: All Practicum and Clinical Training courses require face-to-face on-site clinical practice with the client(s). The experience must be performed under face-to-face supervision of an approved licensed supervisor. This experience should be conducted in the state in which the student will seek licensure. Prerequisite: FT 7370.

FT 7372 – MFT Clinical Training II (3 Semester Hours)

This is a continuation of FT 7371, requiring student interns to work in a therapeutic setting with an Approved Supervisor to complete the appropriate Clinical Training Program requirements. Students who successfully complete FT 7371 and FT 7372 will have completed at least 500 clock hours of internship, at least 100 of which must be direct client contact. NOTE: All Practicum and Clinical Training courses require face-to-face on-site clinical practice with the client(s). The experience must be performed under face-to-face supervision of an approved licensed supervisor. This experience should be conducted in the state in which the student will seek licensure. Prerequisite: FT 7371.

FT 7373 – MFT Clinical Training III (3 Semester Hours)

This is a continuation of FT 7372, requiring student interns to work in a therapeutic setting with an Approved Supervisor to complete the appropriate Clinical Training Program requirements. NOTE: All Practicum and Clinical Training courses require face-to-face on-site clinical practice with the client(s). The experience must be performed under face-to-face supervision of an approved licensed supervisor. This experience should be conducted in the state in which the student will seek licensure. Prerequisite: FT 7372.

FT 7374 – MFT Clinical Training IV (3 Semester Hours)

This is a continuation of FT 7373. Students in this course will demonstrate continued growth in clinical identity and clinical competence through continued work with their supervisor and through continued client contact. The other requirements of FT 7373 continue to apply. Students continue working toward the requirement of a total of 500 hours of client contact plus 100 hours of supervision of that client contact. Prerequisite: FT 7373.

FT 7375 – Special Studies in Therapy (3 Semester Hours)

This course is designed to allow studies to investigate special topics related to Marriage and Family Therapy or Professional Counseling not addressed in other courses. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor (POI).

FT 7376 – MFT Clinical Training V (3 Semester Hours)

This is a continuation of FT 7374. Students in this course will demonstrate continued growth in clinical identity and clinical competence through continued work with their supervisor and through continued client contact. The other requirements of FT 7373 continue to apply. Students continue working toward the requirement of a total of 500 hours of client contact plus 100 hours of supervision of that client contact. Students who do not meet the total clinical experience requirements by the end of this course will require permission of the Dean to continue. Prerequisite: FT 7374.

FT 8300 – Supervisor Training (3 Semester Hours)

This course meets the academic requirements for marriage and family therapy supervisor training. It follows the standards outlined in the current AAMFT Approved Supervisor Handbook. This course reviews the major theories of family therapy and how each theory impacts the way one does supervision; and the ethical codes of the major professional organization as they related to supervision of therapy. Students will learn and practice models of therapy supervision; and create a philosophy of supervision, based on a case study. There are two modules in this course: a didactic module, which requires extensive reading of supervision literature, and an interactive module, during which students discuss supervision case material with peers.

FT 8350 – Intensive Practice in Qualitative and Other Academic Writings for Publication and Presentation (3 Semester Hours)

During this intensive and applied course students will learn skills, guidelines and structures for writing articles and book reviews for publication in academic journals, as well as presentation proposals for academic conferences, using the most current APA standards. Additionally, students will learn how to edit, submit and revise their writing. By the termination of this course each student successfully completing this course will write and submit one literature review (or appropriate document containing a literature review) for publication and one book review for publication based on their literature review. Specialized guidance in qualitative research writing will be available for students working from those methodologies. Students enrolling in this course will be expected to have a topic of interest which they are ready to begin (or have already begun) researching and writing about. Students may take this course more than once as part of their program of academic writing and research.

FT 9300 – Family Therapy in the DMin Setting (3 Semester Hours)

This course is an orientation to DMin studies. Because it creates the four-year learning plan, the successful completion of this course is required before the student can proceed to other courses. The orientation must be taken on campus and will include five sub-modules.

1.                   Personal Learning Plan – All students will create this plan of study by reflecting on their concentration of study and their future professional goals.

2.                   Research Procedures – This module explores resources found in libraries and other materials relating to the theme of one's dissertation. It is in this module that all students will choose a tentative subject for their dissertation.

3.                   Personality Profile – This time together is spent looking at how the students fit their group and relate to one another. The stress factors of doctoral study are also explained.

4.                   Concentrations – During this module those choosing Pastoral Counseling, Professional Counseling or Marriage and Family Therapy will be given individual time.

5.                   Student Colloquium – This conference time is scheduled to allow the students to come together to reflect on what they have done, how they feel about it, and assist one another by peer cooperation.

Special Note: There is a 5-day, on-campus attendance requirement for this course that will be scheduled by the course instructor.

FT 9301 – Introduction to Pastoral Counseling (3 Semester Hours)

A study of the history and development of Christian counseling. It explores the unique techniques used in pastoral counseling.

FT 9303 – Ministry and the Contemporary World (3 Semester Hours)

This course examines the methods by which ministry must be adaptable to the culture of today in order for it to succeed as the service it was designed to be.

FT 9304 – History of Pastoral Care (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of the development of pastoral care with an emphasis upon the historical and contemporary theories which have contributed to the development of pastoral care. Special emphasis will be placed upon the development of the biopsychosocial spiritual model and the role of MFTs, Professional Counselors and Pastoral Counselors in Pastoral Care contexts.

FT 9312 – History of Chaplaincy in the Armed Services (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of the history of the chaplaincy in the U.S. Armed Forces, from its beginnings with the Continental Army and Navy to current expressions.

FT 9313 – Faith Development and Counseling (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of faith development foundations and counseling and the relationship between one's faith and the purposes, theories, and methods of counseling used to integrate the two.

FT 9317 – Ministerial Counseling with Children and Adolescents (3 Semester Hours)

This course explores child and adolescent development, counseling theories, counseling strategies and interventions methodologies from a ministerial counseling perspective. There is a focus on working with individual children and adolescents, as well as the treatment of children and adolescents within the family system.

FT 9324 – Chaplaincy in Contingency Operations (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of how chaplains must operate in many environments. This course focuses on the unique demands chaplains face during contingency operations, especially short-term, high-intensity operations.

FT 9327 – Psychology of Religion (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of how psychology is involved in the way we worship, interpret the rituals, and our religious experiences from childhood to adulthood.

FT 9328 – Chaplaincy and Religious Diversity (3 Semester Hours)

This course examines how chaplains are the protectors of the religious liberty of all members of the U.S. Armed Forces. In addition, they are the commander's experts on religious issues. This course examines major religious traditions chaplains are likely to encounter.

FT 9330 – Interpersonal and Family Dynamics (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a study that provides a broad understanding of family development, dynamics, and therapeutic theories; leadership styles; basic and advanced methods of conducting groups in a therapeutic setting.

FT 9333 – Systemic Treatment of Substance Related Disorders (3 Semester Hours)

This course addresses the treatment of substance related disorders from a systemic perspective. Emphasis will be placed upon the assessment and treatment of substance related disorders utilizing historical and contemporary models of treatment. A special focus will be placed upon the research that has been generated on the efficacy of family based models of treatment.

FT 9338 – Clinical Practice in Gerontology (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of clinical issues related to aging. It addresses special issues facing elders, challenges of elder care for families and caregivers, developmental issues across the lifespan, the development of clinical skills related to working with aging clients, and issues related to ageism in society.

FT 9345 – Applied Psychotherapeutic Techniques (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of methods used by therapists to diagnose, treat, and write diagnostic evaluations of mental, emotional, and other behavioral problems in individuals and families. Such areas as Gerontology, Chemical Treatment, Chaplaincy, or another specified field of study may be chosen. Prerequisite: FT 7336.

FT 9350 – Lifestyle and Career Development (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of career development theories; occupational and advanced educational sources and systems; and, career planning and evaluation.

FT 9352 – Advanced Larger Systems Consultation (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of how systems go beyond the family to organizations and industrial settings. It provides methods of developing leadership from a systems perspective.

FT 9353 – Chaplaincy to Larger Systems Issues (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of how chaplains operate with military units as well as families. This course applies systems principles to working with wing, brigade, fleet, and similar larger systems.

FT 9356 – Medical Family Therapy (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of how therapists can work with the family practice medical community to advance the wholeness of the family especially from personality disorders such as anxiety, depression, etc. Prerequisite: FT 7355.

FT 9365 – Design and Analysis in Research III (3 Semester Hours)

This course provides an in-depth and an applied view of discriminate analysis, MANOVA, canonical correlation, and exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis as they are utilized in research with a special emphasis on family therapy research.

FT 9377 – Quality Practice Operations and Fiscal Systems (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of the business operations and fiscal systems associated with the running of private practices, HMOs, mental health organizations, managed care, or other types of offices and practices providing treatment to family therapy patients or clients. A major emphasis will include a quality management of client, patient, and customer service operations, computer programs and systems for patient or client records and third party billing. Also, instruction will be provided on the DSM-IV elements and the relationship to client or patient medical records and third party billing and multi-third party billing cascades.

 

 

LD – LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT STUDIES

LD 6320 – Managerial Finance (3 Semester Hours)

An introduction to business finance (corporate financial management and investments); it prepares both majors and non-majors for upper-level course work. Students gain tools and frameworks to analyze financial decisions based on principles of modern financial theory.

LD 6351 – Leadership Foundations (3 Semester Hours)

This course provides a foundation of skills needed to equip students for future leadership activities. The focus is to bridge leadership theory and current management practice from a biblical perspective. Topics include leadership theory, motivation, group dynamics, communication, stress management, status, power and politics as well as organizational culture, ethics and applied leadership. Students will be provided with feedback on their own leadership style through leadership instruments, exercises and assessments.

LD 6352 – Building Effective Organizations (3 Semester Hours)

This integrative course examines the various strategy, structure, and culture options to succeed in a challenging, global, competitive environment. Students will focus on the dimensions of organizational structure, the impact of business strategy, size, technology and the external environment. Organizational effectiveness criteria are analyzed in terms of business success indicators, organizational culture, and the pressures of change.

LD 6353 – Leadership Vision and Values (3 Semester Hours)

This course will describe how the values of an organization are a direct result of the visualization, values, and ethical standards of the organization’s leader. Examples from Biblical text will be studied that will provide students with the character, temperament, and disposition necessary to be an effective leader.

LD 6354 – Systems for Today’s Leaders (3 Semester Hours)

This course will seek to provide a foundation for the application of systems theory that will be used within the contemporary business environment. Three types of organizational systems will be discussed. Students will be taught how technology must be integrated into the organization in order to achieve strategic and operational objectives. Cultural and political systems will also be discussed. Through independent study, students will seek to acquire knowledge of organizations as systems.

LD 6355 – Strategies for Organizational Change (3 Semester Hours)

This course addresses the nature and dynamics of change in organizations as well as the leadership skills that are necessary to adopt and initiate change. Students will learn that change is not only necessary to improve an organization, but it is also a tool of survival. The course will describe the strategies necessary to implement change, skills a leader must possess to lead the organization successfully through the change, and the interpersonal dynamics that are present during phases of transition. Group models presented in Scripture will also be analyzed.

Note: This is a Capstone Course and should be taken only by students nearing completion of the Master of .Science in Organizational Leadership or Master of Arts in Organizational and Behavioral Leadership.

LD 6356 – Organizational Group Leadership (3 Semester Hours)

This course focuses on a variety of concepts for leaders to transform individuals and functional groups into action-learning teams vital to high performance organizations. The course topics include overcoming resistance to change implementation by involving critical stakeholders with emphasis on interpersonal behavior, group dynamics, communication, job design, role definition, motivation of individuals, work force diversity, and the evolution of group cultures and norms in various work environments. Case studies and problem resolution are the focus of this experience.

LD 6357 – Organizational Communication (3 Semester Hours)

This course will address the importance of the leader possessing the skills necessary to communicate effectively. Formal and informal communication will be addressed. How effective communication leads to organizational satisfaction will be examined. The student will be taught conflict management and resolution skills.


LD 6358 – Theories of Motivational Leadership (3 Semester Hours)

This course examines principles of motivation within the organization. Students will look at theories of motivation, examine the relationships between the leader and follower, and will strive to find solutions to organizational behavior problems.

LD 6359 – Military Leadership Models (3 Semester Hours)

Students will study the leadership styles of the great military leaders to gain an understanding of effective leadership strategies. Students will examine the strengths and weaknesses of these military leaders in an effort to incorporate strategies into developing their own leadership styles and skills. Biblical leadership styles will also be explored.

LD 6360 – Negotiation and Conflict Resolution (3 Semester Hours)

This course will discuss the negotiation process and conflict resolution. The process of reaching an optimum solution that will benefit all parties will be examined. Interpersonal and Family Dynamics will be discussed as it relates to conflict resolution and negotiation.

LD 6361 – Organizational Development (3 Semester Hours)

This course will describe organizational development as the tool used to determine when change is necessary to correct a problem within the institution. Students will also be taught how to implement these changes.

LD 6362 – Spiritual Leadership (3 Semester Hours)

Students will be taught how spiritual leadership is necessary to motivate and revitalize any institution. As a leader of an organization, the spiritual needs of that organization must be understood. A leader that is a spiritual leader will better equip the entire organization to reach its fullest potential. Spiritual leadership from a biblical perspective will be studied.

LD 6365 – Leadership and Ethics (3 Semester Hours)

This course explores the history and development of management and leadership focusing on the impact of leadership on the organization's culture. Through the use of case studies and a problem-based approach to learning, students will have an opportunity to analyze and develop their decision-making skills within the context of an ethical and moral framework. Students will also gain an understanding of the meaning and importance of the law, ethics, personal morality, corporate social responsibility through codes of ethics, and social responsibility of organizations in domestic and global environments.

LD 6367 – Strategic and Operational Leadership (3 Semester Hours)

This course focuses on the critical analysis of strategic leadership. Students identify organizational strengths and needs in order to develop a strategic plan to achieve organizational mission, vision and objectives, learn scenario planning skills and strategies, and demonstrate understanding of leadership initiatives and systems essential for organizational growth and productivity. Typically this requires the organization to achieve, at a minimum cost, quality and economic equality, responsiveness and adaptability to customer needs, rapid time to market, and process technology. These essential elements of strategic leadership are highlighted in this developmental process.

LD 6370 – Organizational Behavior (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of the tendencies of organizations to form their own behavior patterns, traits, and tendencies. Students will investigate the process by which organizations evolve behaviors similar to individuals. The student will develop skills in assessing organizational maturity and procedures for applying the appropriate leadership skills.

LD 6372 – Management of Teams (3 Semester Hours)

This course utilizes a variety of concepts and practices associated with developing and managing an effective team. Course topics include different approaches to leadership, motivation, and performance, along with team formation, types of teams and groups, theoretical and practical approaches to team effectiveness, and barriers to effective team efforts with strategies for overcoming the barriers to performance. Case studies and problem resolution are the focus of this experience. Expected student outcomes include mastering the basic concepts, theories, and fundamental techniques of team management, identifying current challenges and issues confronting leaders, and identifying positive team management strategies and applications.

LD 6373 – Project Management (3 Semester Hours)

This course introduces theoretical and practical challenges of the project management framework, including the basic project management life phases (initiation, planning, execution, control, and closure) and lifecycle transition. Students will explore research methods used in analyzing and managing project scope, schedule, costs and control, and risk assessment. Students will also develop a working knowledge of the most commonly used project management software, Microsoft Project, to initiate projects, manage activities and resources, track schedules, and report project information to stakeholders.

LD 6374 – Leadership through Coaching and Mentoring (3 Semester Hours)

Investigates the principles and practices of the leader as mentor, coach, and discipler. The student will explore the psychological contract that exists between the mentor and his or her protégé, investigating psychosocial, instrumental, and spiritual functions of mentoring.

LD 6375 – Team Leadership for Church Development (3 Semester Hours)

Students will be taught to recognize and appreciate the various leadership roles associated with the local church. The student will learn to function as a leader for specific functions under the oversight of the eldership. The student will be able to contribute to the development of the congregation and the church in general.

LD 6380 – Human Resource Leadership (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a survey of all human resources (HR) functions. It focuses on the view of HR from the perception of both management and subordinate employees. Students will learn about the elements which drive business success, theories of motivation, and methods for creating a plan for maximizing the human capital of an organization. The student is exposed to practical situations and problem solving regarding areas of employee counseling, discipline and termination. Other critical areas such as training and development, staffing and strategy are explored.

LD 6385 – Ministerial Leadership (3 Semester Hours)

Students will learn how spiritual leadership is necessary in the work of ministry. The concept of motivation, organizational communication, visualization, and Interpersonal and Family Dynamics will be studied. The concept of leadership from a Biblical perspective will be personally analyzed, evaluated, and adapted by the student. The major constructs developed in the program will be assessed and the interrelationship and synergy of the subjects will be emphasized.

Note: This is a Capstone Course and should be taken only by students nearing completion of the Master of Science in Ministerial Leadership.

LD 6520 – Managerial Finance (5 Semester Hours)

An introduction to business finance (corporate financial management and investments); it prepares both majors and non-majors for upper-level course work. Students gain tools and frameworks to analyze financial decisions based on principles of modern financial theory. A major paper or project is required.

LD 6551 – Leadership Foundations (5 Semester Hours)

This course seeks to provide a foundation of skills needed to equip students for future leadership activities. The focus is to bridge leadership theory and current management practice from a biblical perspective. Topics include leadership theory, motivation, group dynamics, communication, stress management, status, power and politics as well as organizational culture, ethics and applied leadership. Students will be provided with feedback on their own leadership style through leadership instruments, exercises and assessments. A major term paper is required.

LD 6552 – Building Effective Organizations (5 Semester Hours)

This integrative course examines the various strategy, structure, and culture options to succeed in a challenging, global, competitive environment. Students will focus on the dimensions of organizational structure, the impact of business strategy, size, technology and the external environment. Organizational effectiveness criteria are analyzed in terms of business success indicators, organizational culture, and the pressures of change. A major term paper is required.

LD 6553 – Leadership Vision and Values (5 Semester Hours)

This course will describe how the values of an organization are a direct result of the visualization, values, and ethical standards of the organization’s leader. Examples from Biblical text will be studied that will provide students with the character, temperament, and disposition necessary to be an effective leader. A major paper or project is required.

LD 6554 – Systems for Today’s Leaders (5 Semester Hours)

This course will seek to provide a foundation for the application of systems theory that will be used within the contemporary business environment. Three types of organizational systems will be discussed. Students will be taught how technology must be integrated into the organization in order to achieve strategic and operational objectives. Cultural and political systems will also be discussed. Through independent study, students will seek to acquire knowledge of organizations as systems. A major paper or project is required.

LD 6555 – Strategies for Organizational Change (5 Semester Hours)

This course addresses the nature and dynamics of change in organizations as well as the leadership skills that are necessary to adopt and initiate change. Students will learn that change is not only necessary to improve an organization, but it is also a tool of survival. The course will describe the strategies necessary to implement change, skills a leader must possess to lead the organization successfully through the change, and the interpersonal dynamics that are present during phases of transition. Group models presented in Scripture will also be analyzed.

Note: This is a Capstone Course and should be taken only by students nearing completion of the Master of Arts in Behavioral Leadership and Management or Master of Science in Leadership and Management.

LD 6556 – Organizational Group Leadership (5 Semester Hours)

This course focuses on a variety of concepts for leaders to transform individuals and functional groups into action-learning teams vital to high performance organizations. The course topics include overcoming resistance to change implementation by involving critical stakeholders with emphasis on interpersonal behavior, group dynamics, communication, job design, role definition, motivation of individuals, work force diversity, and the evolution of group cultures and norms in various work environments. Case studies and problem resolution are the focus of this experience. A major paper or project is required.

LD 6557 – Organizational Communication (5 Semester Hours)

This course will address the importance of the leader possessing the skills necessary to communicate effectively. Formal and informal communication will be addressed. How effective communication leads to organizational satisfaction will be examined. The student will be taught conflict management and resolution skills. A major paper or project is required.

LD 6558 – Theories of Motivational Leadership (5 Semester Hours)

This course examines principles of motivation within the organization. Students will look at theories of motivation, examine the relationships between the leader and follower, and will strive to find solutions to organizational behavior problems. A major paper or project is required.

LD 6559 – Military Leadership Models (5 Semester Hours)

Students will study the leadership styles of the great military leaders to gain an understanding of effective leadership strategies. Students will examine the strengths and weaknesses of these military leaders in an effort to incorporate strategies into developing their own leadership styles and skills. Biblical leadership styles will also be explored. A major paper or project is required.

LD 6560 – Negotiation and Conflict Resolution (5 Semester Hours)

This course will discuss the negotiation process and conflict resolution. The process of reaching an optimum solution that will benefit all parties will be examined. Interpersonal and Family Dynamics will be discussed as it relates to conflict resolution and negotiation. A major paper or project is required.

LD 6561 – Organizational Development (5 Semester Hours)

This course will describe organizational development as the tool used to determine when change is necessary to correct a problem within the institution. Students will also be taught how to implement these changes. A major paper or project is required.

LD 6562 – Spiritual Leadership within the Organization (5 Semester Hours)

Students will be taught how spiritual leadership is necessary to motivate and revitalize any institution. As a leader of an organization, the spiritual needs of that organization must be understood. A leader that is a spiritual leader will better equip the entire organization to reach its fullest potential. Spiritual leadership from a biblical perspective will be studied. A major paper or project is required.

LD 6565 – Leadership and Ethics (5 Semester Hours)

This course explores the history and development of management and leadership focusing on the impact of leadership on the organization's culture. Through the use of case studies and a problem-based approach to learning, students will have an opportunity to analyze and develop their decision-making skills within the context of an ethical and moral framework. Students will also gain an understanding of the meaning and importance of the law, ethics, personal morality, corporate social responsibility through codes of ethics, and social responsibility of organizations in domestic and global environments. A major term paper is required.

LD 6567 – Strategic and Operational Leadership (5 Semester Hours)

This course focuses on the critical analysis of strategic leadership. Students identify organizational strengths and needs in order to develop a strategic plan to achieve organizational mission, vision and objectives, learn scenario planning skills and strategies, and demonstrate understanding of leadership initiatives and systems essential for organizational growth and productivity. Typically this requires the organization to achieve, at a minimum cost, quality and economic equality, responsiveness and adaptability to customer needs, rapid time to market, and process technology. These essential elements of strategic leadership are highlighted in this developmental process. A major paper or project is required.

LD 6570 – Organizational Behavior (5 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of the tendencies of organizations to form their own behavior patterns, traits, and tendencies. Students will investigate the process by which organizations evolve behaviors similar to individuals. The student will develop skills in assessing organizational maturity and procedures for applying the appropriate leadership skills. A major paper or project is required.

LD 6572 – Management of Teams (5 Semester Hours)

This course utilizes a variety of concepts and practices associated with developing and managing an effective team. Course topics include different approaches to leadership, motivation, and performance, along with team formation, types of teams and groups, theoretical and practical approaches to team effectiveness, and barriers to effective team efforts with strategies for overcoming the barriers to performance. Case studies and problem resolution are the focus of this experience. Expected student outcomes include mastering the basic concepts, theories, and fundamental techniques of team management, identifying current challenges and issues confronting leaders, and identifying positive team management strategies and applications. A major paper or project is required.

LD 6573 – Project Management (5 Semester Hours)

This course introduces theoretical and practical challenges of the project management framework, including the basic project management life phases (initiation, planning, execution, control, and closure) and lifecycle transition. Students will explore research methods used in analyzing and managing project scope, schedule, costs and control, and risk assessment. Students will also develop a working knowledge of the most commonly used project management software, Microsoft Project, to initiate projects, manage activities and resources, track schedules, and report project information to stakeholders. A major term paper is required.

LD 6574 – Leadership through Coaching and Mentoring (5 Semester Hours)

Investigates the principles and practices of the leader as mentor, coach, and discipler. The student will explore the psychological contract that exists between the mentor and his or her protégé, investigating psychosocial, instrumental, and spiritual functions of mentoring. A major paper or project is required.

LD 6575 – Team Leadership for Church Development (5 Semester Hours)

Students will be taught to recognize and appreciate the various leadership roles associated with the local church. The student will learn to function as a leader for specific functions under the oversight of the eldership. The student will be able to contribute to the development of the congregation and the church in general.

LD 6580 – Human Resource Leadership (5 Semester Hours)

This course is a survey of all human resources (HR) functions. It focuses on the view of HR from the perception of both management and subordinate employees. Students will learn about the elements which drive business success, theories of motivation, and methods for creating a plan for maximizing the human capital of an organization. The student is exposed to practical situations and problem solving regarding areas of employee counseling, discipline and termination. Other critical areas such as training and development, staffing and strategy are explored. A major term paper is required.

LD 6585 – Ministerial Leadership (5 Semester Hours)

Students will learn how spiritual leadership is necessary in the work of ministry. The concept of motivation, organizational communication, visualization, and Interpersonal and Family Dynamics will be studied. The concept of leadership from a Biblical perspective will be personally analyzed, evaluated, and adapted by the student. The major constructs developed in the program will be assessed and the interrelationship and synergy of the subjects will be emphasized. The course includes the Exit Exam for the Master of Science in Ministerial Leadership. Successful completion of the Exit Exam is required to receive the degree.

Note: This is a Capstone Course and should be taken only by students nearing completion of the Master of Science in Ministerial Leadership.

 

 

MS – MISSIONS STUDIES

MS 6301 – Study of World Religions (3 Semester Hours)

A study of the various religions of the world, including Islam, Judaism, Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism and others. They are critiqued from a Christian perspective.

MS 6302 – Introduction to Missiology (3 Semester Hours)

An introduction to the biblical origins, history, and methods of cross-cultural evangelism, with attention being given to contemporary issues of missiology.

MS 6303 – Introduction to Missionary Life and Work (3 Semester Hours)

A practical examination of the obstacles encountered by the missionary working in a culture other than his own. Topics covered will range from the selection of a mission field to the training of converts.

MS 6306 – Cross-Cultural Ministry and Evangelism (3 Semester Hours)

An in-depth study presenting the principles and techniques of cross-cultural evangelism. This course involves a study of communication models used in the mission field.

MS 6315 – Paul’s Pattern for Evangelism (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of the methodology used by the apostle Paul in evangelizing new areas in establishing congregations. The student will investigate how this methodology can be given practical application in today’s societies.

MS 7320 – Guided Research in Missions (3 Semester Hours)

Graduate students may independently pursue a special problem or area of interest in missions. Under the approval and guidance of an instructor, the project shall lead to the production of a fully-documented research paper.

MS 7322 – Missions Practicum (3 Semester Hours)

A special environment, such as Communist China, Commonwealth of Independent States, India, Cuba, or South America, will be selected for concentrated study. The course will consist of studying practical aspects of living in the culture, presenting Christian evidences, effectively teaching the Gospel, and establishing the church in the context chosen for the study. Assigned readings accompany the actual missionary service and are under the direction of an instructor from the Missions Department of Amridge University.

 

 

NT – NEW TESTAMENT STUDIES

NT 6301 – Critical Introduction to the New Testament (3 Semester Hours)           

A study of the individual books of the New Testament with regard to their authorship, date, content, message, and purpose. Attention is given to various critical methodologies employed to explore the historical background, composition, and theological viewpoint of each book.

NT 6312 – The Life and Teachings of Christ (3 Semester Hours)

A survey of the biblical history of the life of Jesus Christ through an analysis of the four Gospels, with an exegesis of selected texts. The study includes a consideration of the critical theories advanced to explain the similarities and differences between the Synoptic Gospels and evaluation of the methods used in the various quests for the historical Jesus.

NT 6313 – The Gospels of Matthew and Mark (3 Semester Hours)

An introduction of the gospels of Matthew and Mark and an exegesis of selected texts. The authorship, date, purpose, and text of the books are studied. Special attention is given to modern methods of study, including narrative criticism.

NT 6314 – The Gospel of Luke (3 Semester Hours)

An introduction of the gospel of Luke and an exegesis of selected texts. The authorship, date, purpose, and text of Luke are studied. Special attention is given to modern methods of study, including narrative criticism.

NT 6315 – The Gospel of John (3 Semester Hours)

An introduction of the gospel of John and an exegesis of selected texts. The authorship, date, purpose, and text of the gospel of John are studied.

NT 6320 – The Book of Acts (3 Semester Hours)

An introduction of the book of Acts and an exegesis of selected texts. The authorship, date, purpose, and text of Acts are studied. Attention is given to narrative method, historical reliability, and relationship to the epistles.

NT 6321 – New Testament Epistles I (3 Semester Hours)

An introduction to and study of Romans and Galatians. Attention is given to the Judaizing problem, the relation of the Old Testament to the New Testament, and the meaning and implications of justification by faith.

NT 6322 – New Testament Epistles II (3 Semester Hours)

An introduction to and study of I & II Corinthians. This course examines the way that Paul deals with numerous spiritual and practical problems encountered by a young gentile church in a pagan environment.

NT 6323 – New Testament Epistles III (3 Semester Hours)

An introduction to and study of Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, and Philemon. Special attention is given to the Christology and ethical teaching of these books and to the relationship between Ephesians and Colossians.

NT 6324 – New Testament Epistles IV (3 Semester Hours)

An introduction to and study of I & II Thessalonians, I & II Timothy, and Titus. Special attention is given to issues relating to the second coming of Jesus Christ and church organization.

NT 6325 – New Testament Epistles V (3 Semester Hours)

An introduction to the book of Hebrews with an exegesis of selected texts. The authorship, date, purpose, and text are discussed.

NT 6326 – New Testament Epistles VI (3 Semester Hours)

An introduction to the epistles of James, Peter, John, and Jude with an exegesis of selected texts. The authorship, date, purpose, and text are discussed.

NT 6331 – The Book of Revelation (3 Semester Hours)

An introduction to the Book of Revelation with an exegesis of selected texts. The authorship, date, purpose, and text are discussed. Attention is given to Jewish apocalyptic writings as background for the book.

NT 6341 – New Testament Theology (3 Semester Hours)

An examination of the major theological themes in the New Testament and a survey of the history of New Testament Theology, including modern trends and theologians. The course will examine and evaluate various approaches, methodologies, and hermeneutics used for the theological interpretation of the New Testament writings.

NT 7320 – Guided Research in the New Testament (3 Semester Hours)

Students with a good foundation in New Testament studies may independently pursue the study of a special problem or area of interest in the New Testament. Under the approval and guidance of an instructor, the project shall lead to the production of a fully-documented research paper.

NT 9311 – New Testament Text - The Synoptic Gospels (3 Semester Hours)

This course is an examination of major issues in the study of the Synoptic Gospels, with an exegesis of selected texts. Attention is given to the distinctive features of each gospel as well as to the characteristics that they share and the critical theories advanced to explain their possible literary interrelationships. Attention is also given to assessing the value and limitations of various critical methodologies and to evaluating the criteria and methods used in the various “quests” for the historical Jesus. The “Synoptic Problem” will be addressed. Students must submit translations of substantial portions of the text covered. Prerequisite: FD 9002.

NT 9314 – New Testament Text - The Gospel of Luke (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a critical introduction to the Gospel of Luke and an exegesis of selected passages. Attention is given to the author’s purpose, literary methods, major themes, and theology. Particular attention is given to modern methods of study, including narrative criticism. Instruction will be in English with students required to translate portions of the text covered. Prerequisite: FD 9002.

NT 9315 – New Testament Text - The Gospel of John (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a critical introduction to and exegetical study of the gospel of John. Attention is given to the literary character, narrative techniques, and theology of the fourth gospel and to its relation to the Synoptic Gospels. Instruction will be in English with students required to translate portions of the text covered. Prerequisite: FD 9002.

NT 9320 – New Testament Text - Acts of the Apostles (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a critical introduction to and exegetical study of the Book of Acts. Attention is given to the purpose, historical reliability, and theology of the book and to the principles of interpreting historical narrative. Attention is also given to its relationship to the letters of Paul and to its use in reconstructing the history of the early church. Instruction will be in English with students required to translate portions of the text covered. Prerequisite: FD 9002.

NT 9321 – New Testament Text - Romans and Galatians (3 Semester Hours)

This course is an introduction to and exegetical study of Paul’s letter to the Romans and Galatians. Attention is given to Paul’s exposition and defense of the doctrine of justification by faith, the implications of this doctrine for Christian living, the relation of the Old Testament to the New Testament, the place of Israel in God’s plan, and other key aspects of Paul’s theology and ministry. Instruction will be in English with students required to translate portions of the text covered. Prerequisite: FD 9002.

NT 9322 – New Testament Text - I Corinthians (3 Semester Hours)

This course is an introduction to and exegetical study of I Corinthians. This course examines the way that Paul deals with a number of spiritual and practical problems in a young ethnically mixed church in a pagan environment. Attention is given to such issues as diversity of social class and educational background in the Christian community, marriage and celibacy, the status of women, morality and church discipline, Paul’s apostolic authority and conduct of his ministry, the proper exercise of charismatic gifts, true spiritual maturity, appropriate conduct of public worship, and the doctrine of the resurrection of the body. Instruction will be in English with students required to translate portions of the text covered. Prerequisite: FD 9002.

NT 9325 – New Testament Text - Ephesians and Colossians, Philippians and Philemon (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a critical introduction to and exegetical study of Paul's letters to the churches at Ephesus, Colossae and Philippi and to the individual Philemon. Attention is given to questions of authorship, setting, and purpose and to the relationship between Ephesians and Colossians. Attention is also given to the nature of the "Colossian heresy" and to the major theological themes, illustrative imagery, and ethical teaching of these books. Instruction will be in English with students required to translate portions of the text covered. Prerequisite: FD 9002.

NT 9328 – New Testament Text - I & II Timothy and Titus (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a critical introduction to and exegetical study of I & II Timothy and Titus. Attention is given to questions of authorship, literary characteristics, and relation to other Pauline writings. Special attention is given to the problems faced by the church and to the author’s instructions for church organization and Christian living. Instruction will be in English with students required to translate portions of the text covered. Prerequisite: FD 9002.

NT 9331 – New Testament Text - Hebrews (3 Semester Hours)

This course is an introduction to and exegetical study of the book of Hebrews. Attention is given to questions of authorship, literary characteristics, date, and purpose. Attention is also given to the author’s interpretation of the Old Testament and development of Old Testament themes, his theology, and his practical exhortation. Instruction will be in English with students required to translate portions of the text covered. Prerequisite: FD 9002.

NT 9332 – New Testament Text - General Epistles (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a critical introduction to the letters of James, Peter, John, and Jude with an exegesis of selected passages. Attention is given to the main literary characteristics, theological themes, and distinctive message of each book. Particular attention is given to passages that involve special problems of interpretation. Instruction will be in English with students required to translate portions of the text covered. Prerequisite: FD 9002.

NT 9341 – New Testament Text - Revelation (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a critical introduction to and exegetical study of the Book of Revelation. Attention is given to questions of authorship, date, circumstances, literary characteristics, and purpose. Attention is also given to Jewish apocalyptic writings as background for the book, to various hermeneutical approaches, and to proposals for interpreting difficult passages. Instruction will be in English with students required to translate portions of the text covered. Prerequisite: FD 9002.

NT 9351 – Guided Research in the New Testament (3 Semester Hours)

This course is an independent study of a special area of interest in New Testament studies, not listed in the catalog. The study is conducted under the guidance of an instructor. A fully-documented research paper is required. Permission of the Committee is required. Prerequisite: FD 9002.

 

 

OT – OLD TESTAMENT STUDIES

OT 6301 – Critical Introduction to the Old Testament (3 Semester Hours)

A study of the individual books of the Old Testament with regard to their authorship, date, content, message, and purpose. Attention is given to various critical methodologies employed to explore the historical background, composition, and theological viewpoint of each book.

OT 6302 – The Pentateuch (3 Semester Hours)

A study of the first five books of the Old Testament focusing on the historical background, composition, purpose, contents, and message. The various critical methodologies advanced to explain these are also explored.

OT 6303 – Historical Books of the Old Testament I: Joshua, Judges and Ruth (3 Semester Hours)

A study of the backgrounds, compositions, purposes, and contents of Joshua, Judges, and Ruth with application of the message of these books in the modern world. The period of the conquest and judges are explored.

OT 6304 – Historical Books of the Old Testament II: I & II Samuel, I & II Kings (3 Semester Hours)

A study of the backgrounds, compositions, purposes, and contents of I & II Samuel and I & II Kings with application of the message of these books in the modern world.

OT 6305 – Historical Books of the Old Testament III: I & II Chronicles, Ezra, Nehemiah (3 Semester Hours)

A study of the background, composition, purpose, and contents of I & II Chronicles, Ezra, Nehemiah, and Esther with application of the message of these books in the modern world.

OT 6306 – Prophets I: Obadiah, Joel, Jonah, Amos, and Hosea (3 Semester Hours)

A study of the historical backgrounds, compositions, purposes, and contents of the pre-exilic prophets Obadiah, Joel, Jonah, Amos, and Hosea with application in the modern world.

OT 6307 – Prophets II: Isaiah, Micah, and Nahum (3 Semester Hours)

A study of the historical backgrounds, compositions, purposes, and contents of the pre-exilic prophets Isaiah, Micah, and Nahum with application in the modern world.

OT 6308 – Prophets III: Jeremiah, Zephaniah, and Habakkuk (3 Semester Hours)

A study of the historical backgrounds, compositions, purposes, and contents of the pre-exilic and exilic prophets Jeremiah, Zephaniah, and Habakkuk with application in the modern world.

OT 6309 – Prophets IV: Daniel, Ezekiel, Zechariah, Haggai, and Malachi (3 Semester Hours)

A study of the historical backgrounds, compositions, purposes, and contents of the exilic and post-exilic prophets Daniel, Ezekiel, Zechariah, Haggai, and Malachi with application in the modern world.

OT 6310 – The Psalter (Psalms) (3 Semester Hours)

A study of the historical background, composition, and message of the Psalter with consideration to how these poems describe the piety of ancient Israel and how this piety corresponds to modern Christian piety. Attention is also given to the various critical theories advanced to explain this piety.

OT 6311 – The Wisdom Literature (3 Semester Hours)

A study of the didactic literature (Job, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and Song of Solomon) focusing on their authorship, background, purpose, and message. Attention is given to the critical methodologies advanced to define the genre of wisdom literature as well as methods of composition and principles of interpretation.

OT 6313 – Genesis (3 Semester Hours)

A study of the first book of the Old Testament. The course focuses on the historical background, composition, purpose, contents, and message. The various critical methodologies advanced to explain these are also explored.

OT 6315 – Exodus (3 Semester Hours)

A study of the second book of the Old Testament. The course focuses on the historical background, composition, purpose, contents, and message. The various critical methodologies advanced to explain these are also explored.

OT 6321 – I & II Samuel (3 Semester Hours)

This course is an exegetical study of I & II Samuel with special attention given to the theological features of the two volumes. Frequent use is made of the available archaeological and historical information. The study will seek to enhance the student’s ability to evaluate the accuracy and clarity of the standard English versions in the rendering of key passages from the Hebrew Bible. The student will be expected to conduct word studies of important Hebrew terminology.

OT 6322 – I & II Kings (3 Semester Hours)

This course is an exegetical study of I & II Kings. It focuses on the historical background, composition, purpose, contents, and message. The various critical methodologies advanced to explain these are also explored. The basic text to be followed will be the English Bible, yet frequent references will be made to the Hebrew Scriptures.

OT 6323 – Old Testament Text - Jeremiah (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of the backgrounds, compositions, purposes, and contents of Jeremiah with application of the message of the book to the modern world. The course stresses exegesis and interpretation of the book of Jeremiah, with attention to grammatical, literary, and theological features of the text.

OT 7320 – Guided Research in the Old Testament (3 Semester Hours)

Students with a good foundation in Old Testament studies may independently pursue the study of a special problem or area of interest in the Old Testament. Under the approval and guidance of an instructor, the project shall lead to the production of a fully-documented research paper.

OT 7321 – Studies in Old Testament - Hebrew Poetry (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of the biblical poetry of the Hebrew Bible, or the Old Testament. It attempts to analyze the various poetic techniques extant in the poetry of the Old Testament, as well as the structure of poetic verse, and the purpose of figurative language, attempting to comprehend how these things contribute to an understanding of the Old Testament text. Examples of all types of biblical poetry of the Old Testament will be studied, e.g., prophetic poetry, the Psalter, wisdom literature, etc. As this course explores representatives of the various genres of poetry in the Old Testament, it surveys the various interpretative methods developed by scholars for the purpose of determining their degree of validity.

OT 9302 – Old Testament Text - The Pentateuch (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a linguistic, exegetical, critical, and literary study of selected passages in the Torah. Attention will be given to historical and cultural background, literary characteristics, theories of composition, and major theological themes. Instruction will be in English with students required to translate portions of the text covered. Prerequisite: FD 9001.

OT 9312 – Old Testament Text - Joshua and Judges (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a linguistic, exegetical, critical, and literary study of the accounts of the Israelite conquest and settlement of Canaan. Attention will be given to archaeological evidence, critical methodologies, sociological theory, and theological influence in the interpretation of this literature. Instruction will be in English with students required to translate portions of the text covered. Prerequisite: FD 9001.

OT 9316 – Old Testament Text - I & II Samuel (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a linguistic, exegetical, critical, and literary study of the narratives of the rise of the Israelite monarchy and the reign of David. Attention will be given to issues such as the historicity of David and the character of Israelite historiography and to themes such as the early Israelite cultus, the rise of prophecy, and the Davidic kingship. Instruction will be in English with students required to translate portions of the text covered. Prerequisite: FD 9001.

OT 9318 – Old Testament Text - I & II Kings (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a linguistic, exegetical, critical, and literary study of the history of Israel from the age of Solomon through the period of the divided kingdom. Attention will be given to the religious conflict between Yahwism and paganism, the roles of Israel and Judah in international politics, and the relation of this history to the messages of the writing prophets. Instruction will be in English with students required to translate portions of the text covered. Prerequisite: FD 9001.

OT 9320 – Guided Research in the Old Testament (3 Semester Hours)

This course is an independent study of a special area of interest in Old Testament studies, not listed in the catalog. The study is conducted under the guidance of an instructor. A fully-documented research paper is required. Permission of the Committee is required. Prerequisite: FD 9001.

OT 9322 – Old Testament Text - Ezra and Nehemiah (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a linguistic, exegetical, critical, and literary study of the main historical sources relating to the return of Jews from the Babylonian exile. Attention will be given to the historical, political, economic, and religious conditions that Jewish officials and religious leaders faced while they restructured and strengthened Judah as a client state of Persia, rebuilt the temple and reestablished the cultus, and instructed the people in the Torah. Instruction will be in English with students required to translate portions of the text covered. Prerequisite: FD 9001.

OT 9330 – Old Testament Text - The Book of Psalms (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a linguistic, exegetical, critical, and literary study of the Psalter. Attention will be given to the features of Hebrew poetry, uses of imagery, function of various genres, devotional and didactic characteristics, and theological themes. Instruction will be in English with students required to translate portions of the text covered. Prerequisite: FD 9001.

OT 9332 – Old Testament Text - Wisdom Literature (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a linguistic, exegetical, critical, and literary study of selections from the books of Job, Psalms, Proverbs, and Ecclesiastes. Attention will be given to the function of wisdom in Israelite society, the characteristics of wisdom literature, the theological viewpoints expressed, and the treatment of various themes. Consideration will be given to the relation of Old Testament wisdom literature to extrabiblical literature and to its legacy in intertestamental and New Testament writings. Instruction will be in English with students required to translate portions of the text covered. Prerequisite: FD 9001.

OT 9340 – Old Testament Text - Isaiah (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a linguistic, exegetical, critical, and literary study of the Book of Isaiah. Attention will be given to historical background, unity, purpose, and theological themes. Instruction will be in English with students required to translate portions of the text covered. Prerequisite: FD 9001.

OT 9342 – Old Testament Text - Jeremiah (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a linguistic, exegetical, critical, and literary study of the Book of Jeremiah. Attention will be given to the life of the prophet and the circumstances of the Jewish people in times of international crisis. Attention also will be given to the themes and message of the book and to the relation of the Hebrew text to the shorter form of the Septuagint. Instruction will be in English with students required to translate portions of the text covered. Prerequisite: FD 9001.

OT 9344 – Old Testament Text - Ezekiel (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a linguistic, exegetical, critical, and literary study of the Book of Ezekiel. Attention will be given to the conditions of the Jews in Babylonian exile, the personal peculiarities of the author, his use of prophetic signs, his visions, and his portrayal of the future. Instruction will be in English with students required to translate portions of the text covered. Prerequisite: FD 9001.

OT 9346 – Old Testament Text - Daniel (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a linguistic, exegetical, critical, and literary study of the Book of Daniel. Attention will be given to authorship and date, purpose, the genre of apocalyptic, the symbolism in the visions, and theological themes. Consideration will also be given to the influence of Daniel on later apocalyptic writings, including the Book of Revelation, and to various schools of interpretation. Instruction will be in English with students required to translate portions of the text covered. Prerequisite: FD 9001.

OT 9350 – Old Testament Text - Hosea and Amos (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a linguistic, exegetical, critical, and literary study of the Books of Hosea and Amos. Attention will be given to socio-economic, political, and religious conditions in the Kingdom of Israel as it faced Assyrian invasion. Attention also will be given to the literary devices, themes, messages, and theological conceptions of these books. Instruction will be in English with students required to translate portions of the text covered. Prerequisite: FD 9001.

OT 9360 – Old Testament Text - Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a linguistic, exegetical, critical, and literary study of the postexilic prophets. Attention will be given to the historical background of Judah, the role of the prophets in the reconstruction of the nation and its institutions, and the literary and religious qualities of their writings. Instruction will be in English with students required to translate portions of the text covered. Prerequisite: FD 9001.

 

 

PS – PROFESSIONAL STUDIES

PS 6301 – Christian Ministry (3 Semester Hours)

A course focusing on the student’s qualifications for ministry and his understanding and practice of ministry. Attention is given to biblical foundations for working models. The student develops an evocative personal philosophy emphasizing attitude and aptitude.

PS 6302 – Homiletics (3 Semester Hours)

A study of the development and delivery of a sermon. The course covers recent homiletical practices with a focus on the form and function of the sermon.

PS 6303 – Educational Program of the Local Church (3 Semester Hours)

A study viewing the church as an educational institution with a program of teaching. Its organization, administration, curriculum, methods, and principles of development are studied. The educational program’s role in church growth is emphasized.

PS 6304 – Principles of Teaching the Bible (3 Semester Hours)

A study of effective teaching principles, including those used by Jesus. Learning style preferences, learning objectives, teaching strategies, and evaluation are considered. Instruction and practice in course design and lesson preparation are included.

PS 6305 – Conflict Management for Ministry (3 Semester Hours)

Preparing ministers to accept the fact of conflict, discovering what causes it, how it develops, and how it affects the church. From a study of conflict situations in the Bible, theologically sound strategies are developed for managing contemporary conflict in the church.

PS 6306 – Christian Marriage and Family Life (3 Semester Hours)

An examination of mate selection, changing roles of men and women and problems of marriage. Consideration is given also to socialization of children and problems of parenthood. Special emphasis is placed on biblical basis for marriage, ways that a couple can sustain a life-long marriage relationship, and ways that the church can contribute to meaningful family life.

PS 6307 – Psychology of Grief, Death, and Dying (3 Semester Hours)

A course examining the dynamics of grief work. It includes methods of giving care to individuals who are terminally ill and their families and to the survivors of the death of a significant person.

PS 6308 – Crisis Counseling (3 Semester Hours)

This course examines techniques used in counseling families and individuals who face attempted suicide, critical illness, death, divorce, mental disturbances, and other major changes that are part of the human predicament.

PS 6309 – Introduction to Christian Counseling (3 Semester Hours)

A course that introduces the history of and methods used by ministers for counseling within the Christian community. It addresses the problems people usually present to the minister or Christian counselor.

PS 6310 – Personal Evangelism (3 Semester Hours)

An introduction to principles and methods of personal evangelism for the local minister and the missionary. Practical experience in personal evangelism is an important aspect of this class.

PS 6311 – Ministry and the Contemporary World (3 Semester Hours)

This course examines the methods by which ministry must be adaptable to the cultures of today in order for it to succeed as the service it was designed to be.

PS 6312 – Church Growth through Bible School Evangelism (3 Semester Hours)

A practical approach to church growth through the Bible school. The skills and leadership to develop Bible school teachers to be evangelistic at the congregational level.

PS 6314 – Leadership for Christian Service (3 Semester Hours)

The development of leadership principles and skills for service in the church as well as in the home and community. A model of leadership will be proposed and the individual’s propensity for leadership will be assessed. A study of church growth and of personal and interpersonal relationship skills leading to group leadership.

PS 6315 – The Minister and Congregational Service (3 Semester Hours)

This course teaches the practical application of the biblical principles of ministry in a local congregation. This course prepares the student who assumes a position with a congregation be equipped to handle many responsibilities expected of the local minister. These responsibilities include: sermons, funerals, weddings, visiting the sick, visiting members of the congregation, visiting visitors who attended a worship service, hospital visitation, church bulletin preparation, men’s meetings, elders meetings, grooming and attire, counseling, studying, evangelism, edification of members, time management, and a host of other things involved in daily ministry on a congregational level. This course will offer practical guidelines for congregational service.

PS 6316 – Church Ministry and the Internet (3 Semester Hours)

A course designed to make the student cognizant of what is available on the Internet in Christian resources, how to use them, and how to place meaningful resources representing the ministry and the church on to the World Wide Web.

PS 6320 – The Biblical Message of Salvation (3 Semester Hours)

This course highlights the essentials of the gospel message of Christ. Students examine Christ’s death and resurrection and his provision for salvation. A review is given of the message that the Bible provides to a lost generation. The salvation promise will be emphasized.

PS 6321 – Professional Ethics and the Law (3 Semester Hours)

Addresses the ethical and legal environment relevant to ministry and counseling. Current issues and recently enacted law as well as recent court cases will be considered.

PS 6325 – Dealing with Controversial Issues (3 Semester Hours)

This course provides approaches and procedures for addressing controversial issues in the church. Students perform theological analyses of issues in the church. Students study how to provide sensitivity and consideration to various positions relative to an issue while avoiding emotional driven decisions.

PS 6330 – Internship in Ministry I (Master’s degree level) (3 Semester Hours)

This is a supervised working experience in a concentration of ministry for students in a master degree program. A syllabus is to be developed by the student, the on-site supervisor and the University instructor. The syllabus will specify the area of concentration for the internship and must require a report signed by the student and the on-site supervisor (electronic signature is acceptable). The internship must involve a minimum of 300 hours of supervised work experience (paid or un-paid) in the concentration. The on-site supervisor must be trained and approved by the University. This course may be repeated for credit provided the areas of concentration are different. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor (POI).

PS 6331 – Internship in Ministry II (Master’s degree level) (3 Semester Hours)

This is a supervised working experience in a concentration of ministry for students in a master degree program. A syllabus is to be developed by the student, the on-site supervisor and the University instructor. The syllabus will specify the area of concentration for the internship and must require a report signed by the student and the on-site supervisor (electronic signature is acceptable). The internship must involve a minimum of 300 hours of supervised work experience (paid or un-paid) in the concentration. The on-site supervisor must be trained and approved by the University. This course may be repeated for credit provided the areas of concentration are different. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor (POI).

PS 7320 – Guided Research in Professional Studies (3 Semester Hours)

Graduate students may independently pursue the study of a special problem or area of interest in practical studies. Under the approval and guidance of an instructor, the project shall lead to the production of a fully-documented research paper. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor (POI).

PS 9330 – Internship in Ministry (DMin degree level) (3 Semester Hours)

This is a supervised working experience in a concentration of ministry for students in a doctor of ministry degree program. A syllabus is to be developed by the student, the on-site supervisor and the University instructor. The syllabus will specify the area of concentration for the internship and must require a report signed by the student and the on-site supervisor (electronic signature is acceptable). The internship must involve a minimum of 300 hours of supervised work experience (paid or un-paid) in the concentration. The on-site supervisor must be trained and approved by the University. This course may be repeated for credit provided the areas of concentration are different. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor (POI).

 

 

PT – PROFESSIONAL COUNSELING

PT 7300 – PC Ethics and Professional Identity (3 Semester Hours)

A study of Counseling as a profession, this course introduces the ACA Code of Ethics with current ethical issues now facing the profession. Students are encouraged to develop professional goals and objectives. The Professional accrediting body (CACREP), organizations, associations (ACA and ALACA and other relevant state, regional and national associations) as well as credentialing and licensure boards (ABEC and boards in other states, when relevant) are identified and their benefits explained.

PT 7350 – Lifestyle and Career Development (3 Semester Hours)

This course provides a broad understanding of career development theories; occupational and educational information sources and systems; career guidance and education counseling; career decision making; career development program planning and resources; and effectiveness evaluation.

PT 7370 – PC Practicum (3 Semester Hours)

Professional Counseling students must have at least 100 clock hours of experience during practicum. Of these, 40 hours must be direct client contact, including both individual and group work supervised by an Approved Supervisor. NOTE: All Practicum and Clinical Training courses require face-to-face on-site clinical practice with the client(s). The experience must be performed under face-to-face supervision of an approved licensed supervisor. This experience should be conducted in the state in which the student will seek licensure. Prerequisite: FT 7335.

PT 7371 – PC Clinical Training I (3 Semester Hours)

Professional Counseling students will begin a six hundred (600) clock hour internship, which will include at least two hundred forty (240) hours of direct client contact with individuals and groups in a therapeutic setting supervised by an Approved Supervisor. NOTE: All Practicum and Clinical Training courses require face-to-face on-site clinical practice with the client(s). The experience must be performed under face-to-face supervision of an approved licensed supervisor. This experience should be conducted in the state in which the student will seek licensure. Prerequisite: PT 7370.

PT 7372 – PC Clinical Training II (3 Semester Hours)

This is a continuation of PT 7371, requiring student interns to work in a therapeutic setting with an Approved Supervisor to complete the appropriate Clinical Training Program requirements. NOTE: All Practicum and Clinical Training courses require face-to-face on-site clinical practice with the client(s). The experience must be performed under face-to-face supervision of an approved licensed supervisor. This experience should be conducted in the state in which the student will seek licensure. Prerequisite: PT 7371.

PT 7373 – PC Clinical Training III (3 Semester Hours)

This is a continuation of PT 7372, requiring student interns to work in a therapeutic setting with an Approved Supervisor to complete the appropriate Clinical Training Program requirements. NOTE: All Practicum and Clinical Training courses require face-to-face on-site clinical practice with the client(s). The experience must be performed under face-to-face supervision of an approved licensed supervisor. This experience should be conducted in the state in which the student will seek licensure. Prerequisite: PT 7372.

PT 7374 – PC Clinical Training IV (3 Semester Hours)

This is a continuation of PT 7373. Students in this course will demonstrate continued growth in clinical identity and clinical competence through continued work with their supervisor and through continued client contact. The other requirements of PT 7373 continue to apply. Students continue working toward the requirement of a total of 500 hours of client contact plus 100 hours of supervision of that client contact. Prerequisite: PT 7373.

PT 7376 – PC Clinical Training V (3 Semester Hours)

This is a continuation of PT 7374. Students in this course will demonstrate continued growth in clinical identity and clinical competence through continued work with their supervisor and through continued client contact. The other requirements of PT 7373 continue to apply. Students continue working toward the requirement of a total of 500 hours of client contact plus 100 hours of supervision of that client contact. Students who do not meet the total clinical experience requirements by the end of this course will require permission of the Dean to continue. Prerequisite: PT 7374.

PT 7380 – Special Topics (3 Semester Hours)

This is an in-depth study of a topic in the subject area of professional counseling. A major research paper, technical report or project will be required. The instructor must pre-approve the specific topic. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor (POI).

 

RB – RESEARCH – BIBLICAL STUDIES

RB 9385 – Research Dissertation in Biblical Studies Module I Second Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a continuation of Research Dissertation in Biblical Studies Module I First Continuation. All requirements of Research Dissertation in Biblical Studies Module I not previously met must be met to receive a grade of P, pass, for this course. (Pass/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of IP in RB 9395.

RB 9386 – Research Dissertation in Biblical Studies Module II Second Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a continuation of Research Dissertation in Biblical Studies Module II First Continuation. All requirements of Research Dissertation in Biblical Studies Module II not previously met must be met to receive a grade of P, pass, for this course. (Pass/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of IP in RB 9396.

RB 9387 – Research Dissertation in Biblical Studies Module III Second Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a continuation of Research Dissertation in Biblical Studies Module III First Continuation. All requirements of Research Dissertation in Biblical Studies Module III not previously met must be met to receive a grade of P, pass, for this course. (Pass/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of IP in RB 9397.

RB 9388 – Research Dissertation in Biblical Studies Module IV Second Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a continuation of Research Dissertation in Biblical Studies Module IV First Continuation. All requirements of Research Dissertation in Biblical Studies Module IV not previously met must be met to receive a grade of P, pass, for this course. (Pass/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of IP in RB 9398.

RB 9391 – Research Dissertation in Biblical Studies Module I (3 Semester Hours)

The student shall develop a dissertation proposal that is acceptable to the Dissertation Committee, submit an approved bibliography, submit a first draft review of literature unless the Committee directs the student to submit a first draft of an early chapter of the dissertation, and complete any additional dissertation Committee requirements. If all requirements for completion of Module I are not met but the Committee determines that satisfactory progress has been made, a grade of IP may be awarded. (Pass/IP/Fail). Prerequisite: Candidacy Status.

RB 9392 – Research Dissertation in Biblical Studies Module II (3 Semester Hours)

The student shall submit additional dissertation chapters which will comprise approximately half of the dissertation, begin finalizing dissertation chapters, and complete any additional Dissertation Committee requirements. If all requirements for completion of Module II are not met but the Committee determines that satisfactory progress has been made, a grade of IP may be awarded. The Dissertation data collection and reporting plan must be approved by the IRB. (Pass/IP/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of P in RB 9391 or RB 9395 or RB 9385.

RB 9393 – Research Dissertation in Biblical Studies Module III (3 Semester Hours)

The student shall submit first drafts of all dissertation chapters except, with the approval of the Dissertation Committee, the first and/or last chapters, and complete any additional Dissertation Committee requirements. If all requirements for completion of Module III are not met but the Committee determines that satisfactory progress has been made, a grade of IP may be awarded. (Pass/IP/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of P in RB 9392 or RB 9396 or RB 9386.

RB 9394 – Research Dissertation in Biblical Studies Module IV (3 Semester Hours)

The student shall finalize all research; finalize all dissertation chapters to the satisfaction of the Dissertation Committee; orally defend the dissertation before the Dissertation Committee, the Dean of the Turner School of Theology and other faculty members; complete any additional Dissertation Committee requirements; submit, in acceptable form, and defend the final version of the student’s Biblical Doctrines Position Paper, in accordance with the requirements of the course FD 9300-Research In Biblical Doctrine; and submit the completed dissertation to the university library. If all requirements for completion of Module IV are not met but the Committee determines that satisfactory progress has been made, a grade of IP may be awarded. (Pass/IP/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of P in RB 9393 or RB 9397 or RB 9387.

RB 9395 – Research Dissertation in Biblical Studies Module I First Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a continuation of Research Dissertation in Biblical Studies Module I. All requirements of Research Dissertation in Biblical Studies Module I not previously met must be met to receive a grade of P, pass, for this course. If all requirements for a grade of P are not met but satisfactory progress is made the Committee may assign a grade of IP, in progress. (Pass/IP/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of IP in RB 9391.

RB 9396 – Research Dissertation in Biblical Studies Module II First Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a continuation of Research Dissertation in Biblical Studies Module II. All requirements of Research Dissertation in Biblical Studies Module II not previously met must be met to receive a grade of P, pass, for this course. If all requirements to receive a grade of P are not met but the Committee determines that satisfactory progress has been made, a grade of IP may be awarded. (Pass/IP/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of IP in RB 9392.

RB 9397 – Research Dissertation in Biblical Studies Module III First Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a continuation of Research Dissertation in Biblical Studies Module III. All requirements of Research Dissertation in Biblical Studies Module III not previously met must be met to receive a grade of P, pass, for this course. All requirements specified for satisfactory progress must be met to receive a grade of IP for this course. If all requirements to receive a grade of P are not met but the Committee determines that satisfactory progress has been made, a grade of IP may be awarded. (Pass/IP/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of IP in RB 9393.

RB 9398 – Research Dissertation in Biblical Studies Module IV First Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a continuation of Research Dissertation in Biblical Studies Module IV. All requirements of Research Dissertation in Biblical Studies Module IV not previously met must be met to receive a grade of P, pass, for this course. If all requirements to receive a grade of P are not met but the Committee determines that satisfactory progress has been made, a grade of IP may be awarded. (Pass/IP/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of IP in RB 9394.

 

 

RC – RESEARCH – COUNSELING

RC 9385 – Research Dissertation in Counseling Module I Second Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a continuation of Research Dissertation in Counseling Module I First Continuation. All requirements of Research Dissertation in Counseling Module I not previously met must be met to receive a grade of P, pass, for this course. (Pass/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of IP in RC 9395.

RC 9386 – Research Dissertation in Counseling Module II Second Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a continuation of Research Dissertation in Counseling Module II First Continuation. All requirements of Research Dissertation in Counseling Module II not previously met must be met to receive a grade of P, pass, for this course. (Pass/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of IP in RC 9396.

RC 9387 – Research Dissertation in Counseling Module III Second Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a continuation of Research Dissertation in Counseling Module III First Continuation. All requirements of Research Dissertation in Counseling Module III not previously met must be met to receive a grade of P, pass, for this course. (Pass/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of IP in RC 9397.

RC 9388 – Research Dissertation in Counseling Module IV Second Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a continuation of Research Dissertation in Counseling Module IV First Continuation. All requirements of Research Dissertation in Counseling Module IV not previously met must be met to receive a grade of P, pass, for this course. (Pass/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of IP in RC 9398.

RC 9391 – Research Dissertation in Counseling Module I (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a synthesis of research procedures which address the specific research methodologies inherent in producing a project dissertation. The major goals of the course are: (1) To select a student’s dissertation chairman and reader; (2) To complete an initial review of literature; (3) To write the dissertation prospectus; and (4) To complete any Dissertation Committee requirements. If all requirements for completion of Module I are not met but the Committee determines that satisfactory progress has been made, a grade of IP may be awarded. (Pass/IP/Fail). Prerequisites: RS 9364 and Candidacy Status.

RC 9392 – Research Dissertation in Counseling Module II (3 Semester Hours)

The student will begin finalizing dissertation chapters. The major goals of Module II are: (1) To complete Chapter 1; (2) To complete Chapter 2; (3) To complete Chapter 3; and (4) To complete any Dissertation Committee requirements. The Dissertation data collection and reporting plan must be approved by the IRB. If all requirements for completion of Module II are not met but the Committee determines that satisfactory progress has been made, a grade of IP may be awarded. (Pass/IP/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of P in RC 9391 or RC 9395 or RC 9385.

RC 9393 – Research Dissertation in Counseling Module III (3 Semester Hours)

The implementation of the project is extremely important. During this period the student should carry out the project proposal as written and defined in the Research Design completed in Module II. The major goals of Module III are: (1) To implement data collection; (2) To provide documentation of research implementation; and (3) To complete any Dissertation Committee requirements. If all requirements for completion of Module III are not met but the Committee determines that satisfactory progress has been made, a grade of IP may be awarded. (Pass/IP/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of P in RC 9392 or RC 9396 or RC 9386.

RC 9394 – Research Dissertation in Counseling Module IV (3 Semester Hours)

The project data, compiled in Module III, must be formulated, reported, and analyzed in Chapter 4. The final Summations and Conclusions for the project dissertation should be expanded in Chapter 5. The major goals of Module IV are: (1) To complete Chapter 4, reporting and analysis of data; (2) To complete Chapter 5, conclusions; (3) to complete any Dissertation Committee requirements; (4) To successfully defend the dissertation; and (5) To submit the completed dissertation. If all requirements for completion of Module IV are not met but the Committee determines that satisfactory progress has been made, a grade of IP may be awarded. (Pass/IP/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of P in RC 9393 or RC 9397 or RC 9387.

RC 9395 – Research Dissertation in Counseling Module I First Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a continuation of Research Dissertation in Counseling Module I. All requirements of Research Dissertation in Counseling Module I not previously met must be met to receive a grade of P, pass, for this course. If all requirements for completion of Module IV are not met but the Committee determines that satisfactory progress has been made, a grade of IP may be awarded. (Pass/IP/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of IP in RC 9391.

RC 9396 – Research Dissertation in Counseling Module II First Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a continuation of Research Dissertation in Counseling Module II. The Dissertation data collection and reporting plan must be approved by the IRB. All requirements specified for satisfactory progress must be met to receive a grade of IP for this course. (Pass/IP/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of IP in RC 9392.

RC 9397 – Research Dissertation in Counseling Module III First Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a continuation of Research Dissertation in Counseling Module III. All requirements of Research Dissertation in Counseling Module III not previously met must be met to receive a grade of P, pass, for this course. If all requirements for completion of Module IV are not met but the Committee determines that satisfactory progress has been made, a grade of IP may be awarded. (Pass/IP/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of IP in RC 9393.

RC 9398 – Research Dissertation in Counseling Module IV First Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a continuation of Research Dissertation in Counseling Module IV. All requirements of Research Dissertation in Counseling Module IV not previously met must be met to receive a grade of P, pass, for this course. If all requirements for completion of Module IV are not met but the Committee determines that satisfactory progress has been made, a grade of IP may be awarded. (Pass/IP/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of IP in RC 9394.

 

 

RS – RESEARCH – GENERAL

RS 5310 – Research Writing (3 Semester Hours)

This course will review and expand on the principles, techniques, and rules of formal research report writing. Students will undertake a research project. Emphasis will be placed upon proper bibliographic methods, the writing process, and correct use of citation and documentation for the student’s discipline (CMS or APA). The students will submit a final 15-20 page paper as the culminating experience of the course.

RS 6310 – Introduction to Biblical Related Research (3 Semester Hours)

This course is designed to train the student to use library and internet research tools in order to conduct biblical research, to engage in modern academic discourse employing reputable sources such as scholarly books and journals, and to write scholarly research papers in a well-organized, academic format, style and tone.

RS 6339 – Research and Evaluation (3 Semester Hours)

A study that provides a broad understanding of types of research, basic statistics, research-report development, research implementation, program evaluation, needs assessment, writing a research proposal, and ethical and legal considerations in doing research.

RS 6345 – Qualitative and Quantitative Methodology (3 Semester Hours)

This course provides a unique comparison of three key approaches to inquiry. This comparison begins with preliminary consideration of knowledge claims for all three approaches, a review of the literature, and reflections about the importance of writing and ethics in scholarly inquiry. The class also addresses the key elements of the process of research: writing an introduction; stating a purpose for the study; identifying research questions and hypotheses; using theory; defining, delimiting and stating the significance of the study; and advancing methods and procedures for data collection and analysis. Prerequisite: RS 6339 or RS 6539.

RS 6539 – Research and Evaluation (5 Semester Hours)

A study that provides a broad understanding of types of research, basic statistics, research-report development, research implementation, program evaluation, needs assessment, writing a research proposal, and ethical and legal considerations in doing research. Students will develop a research plan incorporating the basic concepts addressed in the course.

RS 6545 – Qualitative and Quantitative Methodology (5 Semester Hours)

This course provides a unique comparison of three key approaches to inquiry. This comparison begins with preliminary consideration of knowledge claims for all three approaches, a review of the literature, and reflections about the importance of writing and ethics in scholarly inquiry. The class also addresses the key elements of the process of research: writing an introduction; stating a purpose for the study; identifying research questions and hypotheses; using theory; defining, delimiting and stating the significance of the study; and advancing methods and procedures for data collection and analysis. Students will develop a major research project or paper incorporating the basic concepts addressed in the course. Prerequisite: RS 6339 or RS 6539.

RS 7302 – Thesis Part I (3 Semester Hours)

Thesis Part I consists of selection and appointment of the major professor and committee, development and approval of the Thesis prospectus, and writing the first three chapters of the Thesis. Allowed grades for the course are P, IP, or F. On campus attendance is required for this course. Prerequisite: RS 6310 or RS 6339 or RS 6539.

RS 7303 – Thesis Part II (3 Semester Hours)

During this phase the student will complete the research project by collecting, presenting, and analyzing the data and drawing conclusions and recommendations (Chapters 4 and 5). Upon approval of the completed Thesis by the committee the student must make an oral defense of his or her Thesis. Allowed grades for the course are P, IP, or F. Prerequisite: RS 7302.

RS 7321 – Research Methodology (3 Semester Hours)

This course provides an introduction to statistical tools and analytical procedures for inferential analysis. Students will study and apply t-tests, ANOVA, and other statistical tools. Selecting research methods and analytical procedures will be addressed. Prerequisite: RS 6339 or RS 6539.

RS 7325 – Historical and Archaeological Research Methodology (3 Semester Hours)

This course addresses the procedures for planning, conducting and assessing archaeological and historical research. Selecting research methods and analytical procedures will be addressed. Designing, preparing and presenting research results will be emphasized. Prerequisite: RS 6339 or RS 6539.

RS 7345 – Qualitative and Quantitative Methodology (3 Semester Hours)

This course provides a unique comparison of three key approaches to inquiry. This comparison begins with preliminary consideration of knowledge claims for all three approaches, a review of the literature, and reflections about the importance of writing and ethics in scholarly inquiry. The class also addresses the key elements of the process of research: writing an introduction; stating a purpose for the study; identifying research questions and hypotheses; using theory; defining, delimiting and stating the significance of the study; and advancing methods and procedures for data collection and analysis. Prerequisite: RS 6339 or RS 6539.

RS 9339 – Research and Evaluation (3 Semester Hours)

A study that provides a broad understanding of types of research; basic statistics; research-report development; research implementation; program evaluation; needs assessment; writing a research project; and ethical and legal consideration in doing research.

RS 9340 – Research Dissertation Module I (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a synthesis of research procedures which address the specific research methodologies inherent in producing a project dissertation. The major goals of the course are: (1) To select a student’s dissertation chairman and reader; (2) To write the dissertation prospectus which will become the first chapter of the project dissertation; and (3) To formulate and write the project proposal and research design. (Pass/IP/Fail). Prerequisite: RS course. Special Note: There is a 5-day, on-campus attendance requirement for this course that will be scheduled by the course instructor.

RS 9341 – Research Dissertation Module II (3 Semester Hours)

The foundation of the research is the review of the related literature. The major goal of Module II is to write Chapter 2, The Review of Literature, and finalize the Research Design of the project proposal of Module I. The Dissertation data collection and reporting plan must be approved by the IRB. (Pass/IP/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of P in RS 9340 or RS 9345 or RS 9355.

RS 9342 – Research Dissertation Module III (3 Semester Hours)

The implementation of the project is extremely important. During this period the student should carry out the project proposal as written and defined in the Research Design completed in Module II. The project must be implemented and formal written proof of implementation must be provided. (Pass/IP/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of P in RS 9341 or RS 9346 or RS 9356.

RS 9343 – Research Dissertation Module IV (3 Semester Hours)

The project data, compiled in Module III, must be formulated, reported, and analyzed in Chapter 4. The final Summations and Conclusions for the project dissertation should be expanded in Chapter 5. Chapters 4 and 5 must be completed. A formal meeting of the committee to approve and finalize all aspects of the dissertation must occur by the end of the semester. (Pass/IP/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of P in RS 9342 or RS 9347 or RS 9357.

RS 9345 – Research Dissertation Module I First Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a continuation of Research Dissertation Module I. All requirements of Research Dissertation Module I not previously met must be met to receive a grade of P, pass, for this course. All requirements specified for satisfactory progress must be met to receive a grade of IP for this course. (Pass/IP/Fail) Prerequisite: Grade of IP in RS 9340.

RS 9346 – Research Dissertation Module II First Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a continuation of Research Dissertation Module II. All requirements of Research Dissertation Module II not previously met must be met to receive a grade of P, pass, for this course. All requirements specified for satisfactory progress must be met to receive a grade of IP for this course. (Pass/IP/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of IP in RS 9341.

RS 9347 – Research Dissertation Module III First Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a continuation of Research Dissertation Module III. All requirements of Research Dissertation Module III not previously met must be met to receive a grade of P, pass, for this course. All requirements specified for satisfactory progress must be met to receive a grade of IP for this course. (Pass/IP/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of IP in RS 9342.

RS 9348 – Research Dissertation Module IV First Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a continuation of Research Dissertation Module IV. All requirements of Research Dissertation Module IV not previously met must be met to receive a grade of P, pass, for this course. All requirements specified for satisfactory progress must be met to receive a grade of IP for this course. (Pass/IP/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of IP in RS 9343.

RS 9355 – Research Dissertation Module I Second Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a continuation of Research Dissertation Module I First Continuation. All requirements of Research Dissertation Module I not previously met must be met to receive a grade of P, pass, for this course. (Pass/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of IP in RS 9345.

RS 9356 – Research Dissertation Module II Second Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a continuation of Research Dissertation Module II First Continuation. All requirements of Research Dissertation Module II not previously met must be met to receive a grade of P, pass, for this course. (Pass/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of IP in RS 9346.

RS 9357 – Research Dissertation Module III Second Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a continuation of Research Dissertation Module III First Continuation. All requirements of Research Dissertation Module III not previously met must be met to receive a grade of P, pass, for this course. (Pass/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of IP in RS 9347.

RS 9358 – Research Dissertation Module IV Second Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a continuation of Research Dissertation Module IV First Continuation. All requirements of Research Dissertation Module IV not previously met must be met to receive a grade of P, pass, for this course. (Pass/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of IP in RS 9348.

RS 9361 – Advanced Research Methods (3 Semester Hours)

This course provides an introduction to the basic methods of inferential analysis. Students will study and apply statistical tools and analytical procedures. The study will include t-tests between and within subjects, ANOVA, mixed ANOVAs, and hierarchical designs as they are utilized in research with a special emphasis on family therapy research. Prerequisite: RS 6339 or RS 6539.

RS 9362 – Theory and Methodology of Qualitative Research (3 Semester Hours)

This course provides an overview of the major modes of qualitative research. The underlying philosophical assumptions about knowledge associated with the various research modes will be investigated. The major strategies for collecting and analyzing relevant data will be studied.

RS 9363 – Design and Quantitative Analysis in Research I (3 Semester Hours)

This course provides a continued and in-depth overview of quantitative research. The student will learn to use bivariate and multiple correlation and regression analysis, trend analysis, analysis of covariance, logistic regression, and path analysis. These analytical procedures will be studied as they are utilized in research with a special emphasis on family therapy research. Prerequisite: RS 9361.

RS 9364 – Design and Quantitative Analysis in Research II (3 Semester Hours)

This course provides a continued and in-depth overview of quantitative research. The student will learn to use discriminate analysis, MANOVA, canonical correlation, and exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. These analytical procedures will be studied as they are utilized in research with a special emphasis on family therapy research. Prerequisite: RS 9363.

 

 

RT – RESEARCH – THERAPY

RT 9385 – Research Dissertation in Marriage and Family Therapy Module I Second Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a continuation of Research Dissertation in Marriage and Family Therapy Module I First Continuation. All requirements of Research Dissertation in Marriage and Family Therapy Module I not previously met must be met to receive a grade of P, pass, for this course. (Pass/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of IP in RT 9395.

RT 9386 – Research Dissertation in Marriage and Family Therapy Module II Second Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a continuation of Research Dissertation in Marriage and Family Therapy Module II First Continuation. All requirements of Research Dissertation in Marriage and Family Therapy Module II not previously met must be met to receive a grade of P, pass, for this course. (Pass/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of IP in RT 9396.

RT 9387 – Research Dissertation in Marriage and Family Therapy Module III Second Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a continuation of Research Dissertation in Marriage and Family Therapy Module III First Continuation. All requirements of Research Dissertation in Marriage and Family Therapy Module III not previously met must be met to receive a grade of P, pass, for this course. (Pass/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of IP in RT 9397.

RT 9388 – Research Dissertation in Marriage and Family Therapy Module IV Second Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a continuation of Research Dissertation in Marriage and Family Therapy Module IV First Continuation. All requirements of Research Dissertation in Marriage and Family Therapy Module IV not previously met must be met to receive a grade of P, pass, for this course. (Pass/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of IP in RT 9398.

RT 9391 – Research Dissertation in Marriage and Family Therapy Module I (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a synthesis of research procedures which address the specific research methodologies inherent in producing a project dissertation. The major goals of the course are: (1) To select a student’s dissertation chairman and reader; (2) To complete an initial review of literature; (3) To write the dissertation prospectus; and (4) To complete any Dissertation Committee requirements. If all requirements for a grade of P are not met but the Committee determines that satisfactory progress has been made, a grade of IP may be awarded. (Pass/IP/Fail). Prerequisites: RS 9364 and Candidacy Status.

RT 9392 – Research Dissertation in Marriage and Family Therapy Module II (3 Semester Hours)

The student will begin finalizing dissertation chapters. The major goals of Module II are: (1) To complete Chapter 1; (2) To complete Chapter 2; (3) To complete Chapter 3; (4) The Dissertation data collection and reporting plan must be approved by the IRB; and (5) To complete any Dissertation Committee requirements. If all requirements for a grade of P are not met but the Committee determines that satisfactory progress has been made, a grade of IP may be awarded. (Pass/IP/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of P in RT 9391 or RT 9395 or RT 9385.

RT 9393 – Research Dissertation in Marriage and Family Therapy Module III (3 Semester Hours)

The implementation of the project is extremely important. During this period the student should carry out the project proposal as written and defined in the Research Design completed in Module II. The major goals of Module III are: (1) To implement data collection; (2) To provide documentation of research implementation; and (3) To complete any Dissertation Committee requirements. If all requirements for a grade of P are not met but the Committee determines that satisfactory progress has been made, a grade of IP may be awarded. (Pass/IP/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of P in RT 9392 or RT 9396 or RT 9386.

RT 9394 – Research Dissertation in Marriage and Family Therapy Module IV (3 Semester Hours)

The project data, compiled in Module III, must be formulated, reported, and analyzed in Chapter 4. The final Summations and Conclusions for the project dissertation should be expanded in Chapter 5. The major goals of Module IV are: (1) To complete Chapter 4; (2) To complete Chapter 5; (3) to complete any Dissertation Committee requirements; (4) To successfully defend the dissertation; and (5) To submit the completed dissertation. If all requirements for a grade of P are not met but the Committee determines that satisfactory progress has been made, a grade of IP may be awarded. (Pass/IP/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of P in RT 9393 or RT 9397 or RT 9387.

RT 9395 – Research Dissertation in Marriage and Family Therapy Module I First Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a continuation of Research Dissertation in Marriage and Family Therapy Module I. All requirements of Research Dissertation in Marriage and Family Therapy Module I not previously met must be met to receive a grade of P, pass, for this course. All requirements specified for satisfactory progress must be met to receive a grade of IP for this course. If all requirements for a grade of P are not met but the Committee determines that satisfactory progress has been made, a grade of IP may be awarded. (Pass/IP/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of IP in RT 9391.

RT 9396 – Research Dissertation in Marriage and Family Therapy Module II First Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a continuation of Research Dissertation in Marriage and Family Therapy Module II. All requirements of Research Dissertation in Marriage and Family Therapy Module II not previously met must be met to receive a grade of P, pass, for this course. All requirements specified for satisfactory progress must be met to receive a grade of IP for this course. If all requirements for a grade of P are not met but the Committee determines that satisfactory progress has been made, a grade of IP may be awarded. (Pass/IP/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of IP in RT 9392.

RT 9397 – Research Dissertation in Marriage and Family Therapy Module III First Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a continuation of Research Dissertation in Marriage and Family Therapy Module III. All requirements of Research Dissertation in Marriage and Family Therapy Module III not previously met must be met to receive a grade of P, pass, for this course. All requirements specified for satisfactory progress must be met to receive a grade of IP for this course. If all requirements for a grade of P are not met but the Committee determines that satisfactory progress has been made, a grade of IP may be awarded. (Pass/IP/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of IP in RT 9393.

RT 9398 – Research Dissertation in Marriage and Family Therapy Module IV First Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a continuation of Research Dissertation in Marriage and Family Therapy Module IV. All requirements of Research Dissertation in Marriage and Family Therapy Module IV not previously met must be met to receive a grade of P, pass, for this course. All requirements specified for satisfactory progress must be met to receive a grade of IP for this course. If all requirements for a grade of P are not met but the Committee determines that satisfactory progress has been made, a grade of IP may be awarded. (Pass/IP/Fail). Prerequisite: Grade of IP in RT 9394.

 

 

TH – THEOLOGICAL AND HISTORICAL STUDIES

TH 5323 – Science, Religion, Philosophy in this World (3 Semester Hours)

The minister and the church face a complicated world of science, philosophy, and religion. The basic premise, principles, and positions of each and their inter-relationship will be covered in this course. Students will be challenged to delve deeper into all of these concepts.

TH 6300 – Early Church History (3 Semester Hours)

Survey of the events from the establishment of the church to the enthronement of Catholicism.

TH 6301 – Patristic Theology (3 Semester Hours)

A study of major developments in Christian theology to ca. A.D. 600 by consideration of conciliar decisions, creedal documents, and the writings of individual theologians.

TH 6302 – Medieval Theology (3 Semester Hours)

A study of major developments in Christian theology from ca. A.D. 600 to 1300 by consideration of conciliar decisions, creedal documents, and the writings of individual theologians.

TH 6303 – Reformation and Modern Church History (3 Semester Hours)

A study of ecclesiastical history from ca. A.D. 1500 to present.

TH 6304 – Restoration History (3 Semester Hours)

A detailed study of the American Restoration Movement from its European backgrounds to the present. A study of places, personalities, and principles of the Restoration Movement, providing an understanding of the religious heritage and its influence on U.S. history. The course will consider the appropriate use of restoration principles in teaching, preaching, biblical exegesis, and evangelism.

TH 6307 – Reformation and Modern Theology (3 Semester Hours)

A study of major developments in Christian theology from the dawn of the Reformation Movement to the modern period. Special attention will be devoted to significant theological movements and theologians.

TH 6310 – Systematic Theology (3 Semester Hours)

A survey of Christian doctrines with an overview of such subjects as: Bibliology, Theology, Angelology, Anthropology, Hamartiology, Christology, Soteriology, Ecclesiology, Pneumatology and Eschatology.

TH 6311 – Christology (3 Semester Hours)

A study of the person and work of Jesus Christ affirming the finality of Jesus as Lord. Beginning with the pre-existence of the Logos, the course will consider the incarnation, the virgin birth, the deity and humanity, the moral perfection, the teachings, the work and atonement, the resurrection, the second coming, and the titles of Jesus as the Christ. The class will conclude with an analysis of the claims of Jesus and Christianity in relation to other world religions.

TH 6316 – Theism and Humanism (3 Semester Hours)

A study of modern humanism, its significance, its background, its philosophical forms and its entrenchment in our modern world, including its infiltration among professed Christians. The methods by which humanism works in societies are discussed, as are also the consequences of humanism. Special attention is then given to how Christians can overcome humanism.

TH 6317 – Philosophy of Religion (3 Semester Hours)

An introduction to philosophical reflection on religion by a study of the relation of faith to reason, the traditional arguments for God’s existence, the meaning of religious belief, and the problem of evil. There will be an emphasis on recent developments.

TH 6318 – New Testament Theology (3 Semester Hours)

An examination of the major theological themes in the New Testament, including an evaluation of various approaches to theological interpretation of the New Testament writings. The history, methodology, and hermeneutics of New Testament theology surveying selected theologians and examining modern trends in New Testament theology are also explored.

TH 6319 – Apologetics/Preaching in the Postmodern Period (3 Semester Hours)

An introduction to a Christian apologetic for confronting the unique challenges of postmodernism from the pulpit. It will balance an analysis of special, recent challenges to faith with a study of Biblical/theological norms under girding a classical, evidentialist apologetic. Emphasis will be upon an exploration of ways in which preaching may be effective for the apologetic enterprise.

TH 6320 – Christian Evidences (3 Semester Hours)

This study presents an apologetic for the Christian faith in the context of modern and contemporary apologetic methods. Drawing from multiple disciplines, the case for the truth of Christianity is developed, argued, and defended in the context of modern and post-modern thought. Attention focuses on apologetic methodology, the arguments for the existence of God, the existential predicament, miracles and history, the resurrection of Jesus, and the inspiration of the Bible.

TH 6321 – Christian Worship (3 Semester Hours)

An exploration of historical, biblical, and theological foundations of Christian worship and a study of contemporary trends in corporate worship. Contemporary tensions over worship are studied in relation to the historic traditions of Christian worship from the early church through the restoration movement and into contemporary society. Old and New Testament materials are surveyed and a theology of Christian worship is developed. Practical issues are addressed regarding contemporary tensions.

TH 6322 – The Biblical Message of Salvation (3 Semester Hours)

This course addresses the doctrine of salvation and prepares students to present the essential message of the gospel of Christ. Both Old and New Testament concepts regarding salvation from sin are studied.

TH 6323 – Science, Religion, Philosophy in this World (3 Semester Hours)

The minister and the church face a complicated world of science, philosophy, and religion. The basic premise, principles, and positions of each and their inter-relationship will be covered in this course. Students will be challenged to delve deeper into all of these concepts.

TH 6324 – Providence and Suffering (3 Semester Hours)

God’s relation to the human predicament is studied. Contemporary typologies of providence and theodicy along with material from Old Testament and New Testament are studied to formulate a biblical theology of providence and suffering.

TH 6325 – Eschatology: Study of Last Things (3 Semester Hours)

A study of both General and Individual Eschatology. There is a need for a proper view of history, general Old Testament teaching about the future, the inter-testamental period concepts and a more thorough look at New Testament teaching, especially Jesus' teaching and the Book of Revelation.

TH 6326 – Spirituality and Spiritual Formation (3 Semester Hours)

A study of Judeo-Christian spirituality and spiritual formation through which students may have opportunities to mature spiritually, grow in faith, achieve greater moral integrity, and be more effective in ministry in the spiritual formation of the ecclesial communities of which they are leaders. The history of Christian spirituality will be explored as a part of the divine-human relationship of human experience. Attention will be given to spiritual disciplines and to a broad diversity of classical and modern Christian devotional literature.

TH 6327 – The Biblical Doctrine of God (3Semester Hours)

This course is a survey of the nature of God, i.e., His character and attributes, as revealed in the Old and New Testaments. Attention is also given to the doctrine of the trinity and contemporary concerns about God that are related to epistemology, metaphysics, divine process, and God’s relationship to the world. procedures. The course is facilitated by one instructor with one or more “guest professors” voluntarily participating in discussions and feedback sessions.

TH 6328 – Comparative Religions (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a comparative analysis of the history and theology of the major religions of the world with particular attention to the distinctive claims of each in the setting of pluralism.

TH 6330 – Bioethics (3 Semester Hours)

This study is an introduction to the moral problems in the field of bioethics, especially from the framework of Christian ethical theory. Topics under review will include health care delivery, issues related to birth and genetics, and death and dying.

TH 6338 – Principles of Ethics (3 Semester Hours)

An investigation of the basis and principles of ethics. Attention is given to problems in moral judgment and evaluation. Particular issues are discussed in a biblical context.

TH 7320 – Guided Research in Theology (3 Semester Hours)

Graduate students may independently pursue a special problem or area of interest in church history or theology. Under the approval and guidance of an instructor, the project shall lead to the production of a fully-documented research paper.

TH 9309 – Research in New Testament Theology (Core) (3 Semester Hours)

This course is an advanced study of the major theological themes and emphases of the New Testament, including the history and development of various approaches to theological interpretation of the New Testament documents and a survey of selected theologians and trends in New Testament theology.

TH 9315 – Biblical Ethics (Core) (3 Semester Hours)

This course is a study of the ethics of the various writings of the Old and New Testament, including the history and development of the methodology of biblical ethics and of major schools of thought.

TH 9318 – Research in Old Testament Theology (Core) (3 Semester Hours)

This course is an advanced study of the major theological themes and emphases of the Hebrew Bible, including the history and development of various approaches to theological interpretation of the Old Testament documents and a survey of selected theologians and trends in Old Testament theology.


REQUIREMENTS FOR DISSERTATION MODULE COURSES FOR THE DOCTOR OF MINISTRY AND DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY PROGRAMS IN THE TURNER SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY

Dissertation Module Course Requirements

for

Doctor of Philosophy in Biblical Studies

(Old Testament Concentration)

 

Doctor of Philosophy in Biblical Studies

(New Testament Concentration)

 

Doctor of Ministry

 

Requirements for Dissertation Module Courses

The following outline identifies basic content requirements for the dissertation modules. The Dissertation Committee may prescribe additional requirements for any or all modules.

 

Dissertation Module Requirements are presented in three parts:

[Part One] Grading Requirements for Dissertation Module Courses

 

[Part Two] Grading Requirements for Dissertation Module First Continuation Courses

 

[Part Three] Grading Requirements for Dissertation Module Second Continuation Courses


 

[Part One] Grading Requirements for Dissertation Module Courses

Allowable grades: P (Pass), IP (In Progress), F (Fail)

 

Module I Course:

RB 9391 – Research Dissertation in Biblical Studies Module I (3 Semester Hours)

Requirements for a grade of P (Pass):

1.   Write and submit a proposal that is accepted by the Dissertation Committee;

2.    Submit an approved bibliography;

3.    Unless it is not demanded by the topic, complete a first draft of a review of all literature on the subject. Alternatively, submission of a significant first draft of an early chapter of the dissertation; and

4.    Fulfill additional requirements from the Dissertation Committee.

Requirements for grade of IP (In-Progress):

If a student does not fulfill all requirements for a module for a grade of P (Pass), a grade of IP (In-Progress) may be assigned only if the Dissertation Committee concludes that significant progress has been made in completing the requirements for a P in the module.

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of P (Pass) or IP (In-Progress):

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of either P (Pass) or IP (In-Progress) will result in a grade of F (Fail).

 

Module II Course:

RB 9392 – Research Dissertation in Biblical Studies Module II (3 Semester Hours)

Requirements for a grade of P (Pass):

1.    Complete first drafts of further chapters which will comprise approximately half of the final dissertation;

2.    Receive approval from the IRB for the research plan; and

3.    Fulfill additional requirements from the Dissertation Committee.

Requirements for grade of IP (In-Progress):

If a student does not fulfill all requirements for a module for a grade of P (Pass), a grade of IP (In-Progress) may be assigned only if the Dissertation Committee concludes that significant progress has been made in completing the requirements for a P in the module.

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of P (Pass) or IP (In-Progress):

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of either P (Pass) or IP (In-Progress) will result in a grade of F (Fail).

 

Module III Course:

RB 9393 – Research Dissertation in Biblical Studies Module III (3 Semester Hours)

Requirements for a grade of P (Pass):

1.    Complete first drafts of all chapters except possibly the introduction and conclusion; and

2.    Complete additional requirements from the Dissertation Committee.

 Requirements for grade of IP (In-Progress):

If a student does not fulfill all requirements for a module for a grade of (Pass), a grade of IP (In-Progress) may be assigned only if the Dissertation Committee concludes that significant progress has been made in completing the requirements for a P in the module.

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of P (Pass) or IP (In-Progress):

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of either P (Pass) or IP (In-Progress) will result in a grade of F (Fail).

 

Module IV Course:

RB 9394 – Research Dissertation in Biblical Studies Module IV (3 Semester Hours)

Requirements for a grade of P (Pass):

1.    Finalize all research and all chapters of the dissertation;

2.    Rewrite all chapters to the satisfaction of the Dissertation Committee;

3.    Prepare for and make the oral defence of the dissertation;

4.    Submit and defend student’s Biblical Doctrines Position Paper;

5.    Complete additional requirements from the Dissertation Committee; and

6.    Secure acceptance of the dissertation by the Head Librarian.

Requirements for grade of IP (In-Progress):

If a student does not fulfill all requirements for a module for a grade of P (Pass), a grade of IP (In-Progress) may be assigned only if the Dissertation Committee concludes that significant progress has been made in completing the requirements for a P in the module.

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of P (Pass) or IP (In-Progress):

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of either P (Pass) or IP (In-Progress) will result in a grade of F (Fail).

 

 

[Part Two] Grading Requirements for Dissertation Module First Continuation Courses

Allowable grades: P (Pass), IP (In-Progress), F (Fail)

 

Module I First Continuation Course:

RB 9395 – Research Dissertation in Biblical Studies Module I First Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

Requirements for a grade of P (Pass):

1.    Write and submit a proposal that is accepted by the Dissertation Committee;

2.    Submit an approved bibliography;

3.    Unless it is not demanded by the topic, complete a first draft of a review of all literature on the subject. Alternatively, submit a significant first draft of an early chapter of the dissertation; and

4.    Fulfill additional requirements from the Dissertation Committee.

Requirements for grade of IP (In-Progress):

If a student does not fulfill all requirements for a module for a grade of P (Pass), a grade of IP (In-Progress) may be assigned only if the Dissertation Committee concludes that significant progress has been made in completing the requirements for a P in the module.

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of P (Pass) or IP (In-Progress):

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of either P (Pass) or IP (In-Progress) will result in a grade of F (Fail).

 

Module II First Continuation Course:                                                             

RB 9396 – Research Dissertation in Biblical Studies Module II First Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

Requirements for a grade of P (Pass):

1.    Complete first drafts of further chapters which will comprise approximately half of the final dissertation;

2.    Complete additional requirements from the Dissertation Committee; and

3.    Receive approval from the IRB for the research plan.

Requirements for grade of IP (Satisfactory Progress):

If a student does not fulfill all requirements for a module for a grade of P (Pass), a grade of IP (In-Progress) may be assigned only if the Dissertation Committee concludes that significant progress has been made in completing the requirements for a P in the module.

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of P (Pass) or IP (In-Progress):

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of either P (Pass) or IP (In-Progress) will result in a grade of F (Fail).

 

Module III First Continuation Course:

RB 9397 – Research Dissertation in Biblical Studies Module III First Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

Requirements for a grade of P (Pass):

1.    Complete first drafts of further chapters which will comprise approximately half of the final dissertation;

2.    Complete additional requirements from the Dissertation Committee;

3.    Complete first drafts of all chapters except possibly the introduction and conclusion; and

4.    Fulfill additional requirements of the Dissertation Committee.

Requirements for grade of IP (In-Progress):

If a student does not fulfill all requirements for a module for a grade of P (Pass), a grade of IP (In-Progress) may be assigned only if the Dissertation Committee concludes that significant progress has been made in completing the requirements for a P in the module. 

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of P (Pass) or IP (In-Progress):

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of either P (Pass) or IP (In-Progress) will result in a grade of F (Fail).

 

Module IV First Continuation Course:

RB 9398 – Research Dissertation in Biblical Studies Module IV First Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

Requirements for a grade of P (Pass):

1.    Finalize all research and all chapters of the dissertation;

2.    Rewrite all chapters to the satisfaction of the Dissertation Committee;

3.    Prepare for and make the oral defence of the dissertation;

4.    Submit and defend student’s Biblical Doctrines Position Paper; and

5.    Secure acceptance of the dissertation from the Head Librarian.

Requirements for grade of IP (Satisfactory Progress):

If a student does not fulfill all requirements for a module for a grade of P (Pass), a grade of IP (In-Progress) may be assigned only if the Dissertation Committee concludes that significant progress has been made in completing the requirements for a P in the module.

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of either P (Pass) or IP (In-Progress):

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of either P (Pass) or IP (In-Progress) will result in a grade of F (Fail).

 

 

[Part Three] Grading Requirements for Dissertation Module Second Continuation Courses

Allowable grades: P (Pass), F (Fail)

 

Module I Second Continuation Course:

RB 9385 – Research Dissertation in Biblical Studies Module I Second Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

Requirements for a grade of P (Pass):

1.    Write and submit a proposal that is accepted by the Dissertation Committee;

2.    Submit an approved bibliography;

3.    Unless it is not demanded by the topic, complete a first draft of a review of all literature on the subject. Alternatively, submission of a significant first draft of an early chapter of the dissertation; and

4.    Fulfill additional requirements from the Dissertation Committee.

Requirements for a grade of IP (In-Progress):

The grade of IP (In Progress) is not allowed in Second Continuation Module courses.

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of P (Pass):

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of P (Pass) will result in a grade of F (Fail).

 


Module II Second Continuation Course:

RB 9386 – Research Dissertation in Biblical Studies Module II Second Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

Requirements for a grade of P (Pass):

1.    Complete first drafts of further chapters which will comprise approximately half of the final dissertation;

2.    Complete additional requirements from the Dissertation Committee; and

3.    Receive approval from the IRB for the research plan.

Requirements for a grade of IP (In-Progress):

The grade of IP is not allowed in Second Continuation Module courses.

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of P (Pass):

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of P (Pass) will result in a grade of F (Fail).

Module III Second Continuation Course:

RB 9387 – Research Dissertation in Biblical Studies Module III Second Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

Requirements for a grade of P (Pass):

1.    Complete first drafts of all chapters except possibly the introduction and conclusion; and

2.    Fulfill additional requirements from the Dissertation Committee.

Requirements for a grade of IP (In-Progress):

The grade of IP (In Progress) is not allowed in Second Continuation Module courses.

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of P (Pass):

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of P will result in a grade of F (Fail).

 

Module IV Second Continuation Course:

RB 9388 – Research Dissertation in Biblical Studies Module IV Second Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

Requirements for a grade of P (Pass):

1.    Finalize all research and all chapters of the dissertation;

2.    Rewrite all chapters to the satisfaction of the Dissertation Committee;

3.    Prepare for and make the oral defence of the dissertation;

4.    Submit and defend student’s Biblical Doctrines Position Paper;

5.    Complete additional requirements from the Dissertation Committee; and

6.    Secure acceptance of the dissertation from the Head Librarian.

Requirements for a grade of IP (In-Progress):

The grade of IP (In Progress) is not allowed in Second Continuation Module courses.

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of P (Pass):

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of P (Pass) will result in a grade of F (Fail).

 

Dissertation Approval Process

Dissertations represent the student, the faculty and the University.  Dissertations are to meet high standards to be approved.  The dissertation approval process involves a series of steps.  The following steps are to be observed.  These procedures are to be presented to the student within the dissertation course syllabi.

1.    The student’s Dissertation Committee members are responsible for assessing the subject content, the research design, the research implementation, the research analysis, and reporting of the results as well as assessing the quality of the written product based on standards of grammar, sentence structure, and the appropriate writing style manual.

2.    Once the student and the Dissertation Committee members are satisfied with the module, the chairperson selects approval on the Dissertation Module Approval Form.  The chairperson forwards the module and the Dissertation Module Approval Form to the dean of the school for review. 

1.                                                                                                              The dean of the school is responsible for assessing the quality of the written product based on standards of the school.  Once the dean of the school is satisfied with the quality of the module he selects approval on the Dissertation Module Approval Form and forwards the module and the approval form to the Vice President of Academic Affairs.

3.    The Vice President of Academic Affairs is responsible for assessing the  quality of the written product based on standards of the University.  Once the Vice President of Academic Affairs is satisfied with the quality of the module he selects approval on the Dissertation Module Approval Form and:

a.    For Modules I through III, the Vice President of Academic Affairs sends notice to the Business Office that the module is approved.

b.    For Module IV, the Vice President of Academic Affairs sends notice to the Business Office that the module is approved after he receives certification from the Head Librarian that all requirements for submission of the dissertation have been met.

4.    The Business Office then processes payment to the Dissertation Committee members.


REQUIREMENTS FOR DISSERTATION MODULE COURSES FOR THE DOCTOR OF MINISTRY AND DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY PROGRAMS IN THE SCHOOL OF HUMAN SERVICES

 

Dissertation Module Course Requirements

for

Doctor of Ministry in Family Therapy I

Doctor of Ministry in Family Therapy II

Doctor of Philosophy in Marriage and Family Therapy

Doctor of Philosophy in Professional Counseling

 

Requirements for Dissertation Module Courses

The following outline identifies basic content requirements for the dissertation modules.   A Historical Research Dissertation may have more chapters and may deviate from this prescribed pattern.  The Dissertation Committee may prescribe additional requirements for any or all modules. A quantitative dissertation must be written in third person.  A qualitative dissertation may be written in first person.

 

Dissertation Module Requirements are presented in three parts:

[Part one] Grading Requirements for Dissertation Module Courses

 

[Part Two] Grading Requirements for Dissertation Module First Continuation Courses

 

[Part Three] Grading Requirements for Dissertation Module Second Continuation Courses

 


 

[Part one] Grading Requirements for Dissertation Module Courses

Allowable grades: P (Pass), IP (In Progress), F (Fail)

Module I Course:

RC 9391 – Research Dissertation in Counseling Module I (3 Semester Hours)

or

RS 9340 – Research Dissertation Module I (3 Semester Hours)

or

RT 9391 – Research Dissertation in Marriage and Family Therapy Module I (3 Semester Hours)

Requirements for a grade of P (Pass):

1.    Complete Initial Review of Literature;

2.    Complete Research Dissertation Prospectus or Proposal, which must include:

a.    Statement of the problem and sub-problems

b.    Statement of hypothesis or research questions

                                          i.    (Quantitative dissertations) Statement of hypothesis

                                         ii.    (Qualitative dissertations) Statement of research questions

c.    Statement of delimitations (what the research will not address)

d.    Statement of definitions of terms

e.    Statement of assumptions

f.     Statement of importance of study

g.    (Qualitative dissertations) Statement of rationale for the selection of qualitative research methodology

h.    (Qualitative dissertations) Statement of relationship of qualitative research methodology to research questions

i.      (Qualitative dissertations) Statement of the Qualitative Researcher’s sampling procedures

j.      (Qualitative dissertations) Statement of how the Qualitative Researcher proposes to analyze the data (e.g., content analysis, thematic analysis, etc.)

k.    (Qualitative dissertations) Statement of how the Qualitative Researcher will address trustworthiness and reliability (e.g., triangulation, member-checking, etc.)

l.      Statement of organization (outline of all proposed chapters and subtopics);and

3.    Fulfill additional requirements from the Committee.

Requirements for a grade of IP (In-Progress):

1.    Complete Initial Review of Literature; and

2.    Fulfill additional requirements from the Committee.

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of P (Pass):

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of either P (Pass) or IP (In-Progress) will result in a grade of F (Fail).

 

Module II Course:

RC 9392 – Research Dissertation in Counseling Module II (3 Semester Hours)

or

RS 9341 – Research Dissertation Module II (3 Semester Hours)

or

RT 9392 – Research Dissertation in Marriage and Family Therapy Module II (3 Semester Hours)

Requirements for a grade of P (Pass):

1.    Complete First Chapter of the research plan which must include:

a.    Introduction

b.    Need for Study

c.    Statement of Problems and Sub-problems

d.    Purpose of Study

e.    Delimitations

f.     Methodology

g.    Definitions of Terms

h.    Organization;

2.    Completed Second Chapter: a Review of Literature

3.    Completed Third Chapter: the Research Design Proposal, which must include:

a.    Description of the research design

b.    Sources and nature of data

c.    Criteria for the admissibility of data

d.    Identification of appropriate procedures for analyzing data.

e.    Method of Collecting Data

f.     Link data and research methodology;

4.    Receive approval from the IRB for the research plan.; and

5.    Fulfill additional requirements from the Committee.

Requirements for a grade of IP (In-Progress):

1.    Complete two approved dissertation chapters; and

2.    Fulfill additional requirements from the Committee.

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of P (Pass) or IP (In-Progress):

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of either P (Pass) or IP (In-Progress) will result in a grade of F (Fail).

 

Module III Course:

RC 9393 – Research Dissertation in Counseling Module III (3 Semester Hours)

or

RS 9342 – Research Dissertation Module III (3 Semester Hours)

or

RT 9393 – Research Dissertation in Marriage and Family Therapy Module III Semester Hours)

Requirements for a grade of P (Pass):

1.    Document proof of implementation of research as defined in Chapter Three (This would include questionnaires, research data, etc.); and

2.    Fulfill additional requirements from the Committee.

Requirements for a grade of IP (In-Progress):

1.    Secure approval of data collection procedures;

2.    Begin research data collection; and

3.    Fulfill Additional requirements from the Committee.

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of P (Pass):

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of either P (Pass) or IP (in- progress) will result in a grade of F (Fail).

Module IV Course:

RC 9394 – Research Dissertation in Counseling Module IV (3 Semester Hours)

or

RS 9343 – Research Dissertation Module IV  (3 Semester Hours)

or

RT 9394 – Research Dissertation in Marriage and Family Therapy Module IV (3 Semester Hours)

 

Requirements for a grade of P (Pass):

1.    Complete Chapter 4 - Reporting of Data;

2.    Complete Chapter 5 - Findings, Analysis, Interpretation, Conclusion and Summary of the Research Dissertation;

3.    Fulfill additional requirements from the Committee;

4.    Successfully defend of the Research Dissertation (Conducted on the main campus);

5.    Submit completed Research Dissertation; and

6.    Secure acceptance of the dissertation by the Head Librarian.

Requirements for a grade of IP (In-Progress):

1.    Complete three approved chapters;

2.    Complete collection of all research data;

3.    Receive approval of data analysis procedures and reporting formats; and

4.    Fulfill additional requirements from the Committee.

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of P (Pass) or IP (In-Progress):

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of either P (Pass) or IP (In-Progress) will result in a grade of F (Fail).

 

 

[Part Two] Grading Requirements for Dissertation Module First Continuation Courses

Allowable grades: P (Pass), IP (In Progress), F (Fail)

Module I First Continuation Course:

RC 9395 – Research Dissertation in Counseling Module I First Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

or

RS 9345 – Research Dissertation Module I First Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

or

RT 9395 – Research Dissertation in Marriage and Family Therapy Module I First Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

Requirements for a grade of P (Pass):

1.    Complete Initial Review of Literature;

2.    Complete Research Dissertation Prospectus or Proposal, which must include:

a.    Statement of the problem and sub-problems

b.    Statement of hypothesis or research questions

                                      i.        (Quantitative dissertations) Statement of hypothesis

                                     ii.        (Qualitative dissertations) Statement of research questions

c.    Statement of delimitations (what the research will not address)

d.      Statement of definitions of terms

e.    Statement of assumptions

f.     Statement of importance of study

g.    (Qualitative dissertations) Statement of rationale for the selection of qualitative research methodology

h.      (Qualitative dissertations) Statement of relationship of qualitative research methodology to research questions

i.        (Qualitative dissertations) Statement of the Qualitative Researcher’s sampling procedures

j.      (Qualitative dissertations) Statement of how the Qualitative Researcher proposes to analyze the data (e.g., content analysis, thematic analysis, etc.)

k.    (Qualitative dissertations) Statement of how the Qualitative Researcher will address trustworthiness and reliability (e.g., triangulation, member-checking, etc.)

l.      Statement of organization (outline of all proposed chapters and subtopics); and

3.    Fulfill additional requirements from the Committee.

Requirements for a grade of IP (In-Progress):

1.    Complete Initial Review of Literature;

2.    Completed a significant portion of the Research Dissertation Prospectus or Proposal, which must include:

a.    Statement of the problem and sub-problems

b.    Statement of hypothesis or research questions

                                      i.        (Quantitative dissertations) Statement of hypothesis

                                     ii.        (Qualitative dissertations) Statement of research questions

c.    Statement of delimitations (what the research will not address)

d.    Statement of definitions of terms

e.    Statement of assumptions

f.     Statement of importance of study

g.    Statement of selection of qualitative research methodology

h.    Statement of relationship of qualitative research methodology to research questions

i.      Statement of the Qualitative Researcher’s sampling procedures

j.      Statement of how the Qualitative Researcher proposes to analyze the data (e.g., content analysis, thematic analysis, etc.)

k.      Statement of how the Qualitative Researcher will address trustworthiness and reliability (e.g., triangulation, member- checking, etc.).

l.      Statement of organization (outline of all proposed chapters and subtopics); and

3.     Additional requirements from the Committee.

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of P (Pass) or IP (In-Progress):

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of either P (Pass) or IP (In-Progress) will result in a grade of F (Fail).

 

Module II First Continuation Course:

RC 9396 – Research Dissertation in Counseling Module II First Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

or

RS 9346 – Research Dissertation Module II First Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

or

RT 9396 – Research Dissertation in Marriage and Family Therapy Module II First Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

 

Requirements for a grade of P (Pass):

1.    Complete First Chapter of the research plan which must include:

a.    Introduction

b.    Need for Study

c.    Statement of Problems and Sub-problems

d.    Purpose of Study

e.    Delimitations

f.     Methodology

g.    Definitions of Terms

h.    Organization;

2.    Complete Second Chapter: a Review of Literature;

3.    Complete Third Chapter: the Research Design Proposal, which must include:

a.    Description of the research design

b.    Sources and nature of data

c.    Criteria for the admissibility of data

d.    Identification of appropriate procedures for analyzing data.

e.    Method of Collecting Data

f.     Link data and research methodology;

4.    Receive approval from the IRB for the research plan; and

5.    Additional requirements from the Committee.

Requirements for a grade of IP (In-Progress):

1.    Completed First Chapter;

2.    Completed Second Chapter, a Review of Literature;

3.    Completed Third Chapter (Except for Committee recommended changes); and

4.    Fulfill additional requirements from the Committee.

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of P (Pass) or IP (In-Progress):

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of either P (Pass) or IP (In-Progress) will result in a grade of F (Fail).

 

Module III First Continuation Course:

RC 9397 – Research Dissertation in Counseling Module III First Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

or

RS 9347 – Research Dissertation Module III First Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

or

RT 9397 – Research Dissertation in Marriage and Family Therapy Module III First Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

 

Requirements for a grade of P (Pass):

1.    Document implementation of research as defined in Chapter Three (This would include questionnaires, research data, etc.); and

2.    Fulfill Additional requirements from the Committee.

Requirements for a grade of IP (In-Progress):

1.    Complete three chapters;

2.    Collect substantial data; and

3.    Fulfill additional requirements from the Committee.

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of P (Pass) or IP (In-Progress):

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of either P (Pass) or IP (In-Progress) will result in a grade of F (Fail).

 

Module IV First Continuation Course:

RC 9398 – Research Dissertation in Counseling Module IV First Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

or

RS 9348 – Research Dissertation Module IV First Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

or

RT 9398 – Research Dissertation in Marriage and Family Therapy Module IV First Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

Requirements for a grade of P (Pass):

1.    Complete Chapter 4 - Reporting of Data;

2.    Complete Chapter 5 - Findings, Analysis, Interpretation, Conclusion and Summary of the Research Dissertation;

3.    Fulfill additional requirements from the Committee;

4.    Successfully defend of the Research Dissertation (Conducted on the main campus);

5.    Submit completed Research Dissertation; and

6.    Secure acceptance of the dissertation by the Head Librarian.

Requirements for a grade of IP (In-Progress):

1.    Completed all chapters of the dissertation; and

2.    Fulfill additional requirements from the Committee

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of P (Pass) or IP (In-Progress):

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of either P (Pass) or IP (In-Progress) will result in a grade of F (Fail).


[Part Three] Requirements for Completion of Dissertation Module Second Continuation Courses

Allowable grades: P (Pass), F (Fail)

 

Module I Second Continuation Course:

RC 9385 – Research Dissertation in Counseling Module I Second Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

or

RS 9355 – Research Dissertation Module I Second Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

or

RT 9385 – Research Dissertation in Marriage and Family Therapy Module I Second Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

Requirements for a grade of P (Pass):

1.    Complete Initial Review of Literature;

2.    Complete Research Dissertation Prospectus or Proposal, which must include:

a.    Statement of the problem and sub-problems

b.    Statement of hypothesis or research questions

                                      i.        (Quantitative dissertations) Statement of hypothesis

                                     ii.        (Qualitative dissertations) Statement of research questions

c.    Statement of delimitations (what the research will not address)

d.    (Qualitative dissertations) Statement of relationship of qualitative research methodology to research questions

e.    (Qualitative dissertations) Statement of the Qualitative Researcher’s sampling procedures

f.     (Qualitative dissertations) Statement of how the Qualitative Researcher proposes  to analyse the data (e.g., content analysis, thematic analysis, etc.)

g.    (Qualitative dissertations) Statement of how the Qualitative Researcher will address trustworthiness and reliability (e.g., triangulation, member checking, etc.)

h.    Statement of organization (outline of all proposed  chapters and subtopics); and

3.    Fulfill additional requirements from the Committee.

Requirements for a grade of IP (In-Progress):

IP (In Progress) is not allowed in Second Continuation Module courses.

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of P (Pass):

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of P (Pass) will result in a grade of F (Fail).

 

Module II Second Continuation Course:

RC 9386 – Research Dissertation in Counseling Module II Second Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

or

RS 9356 – Research Dissertation Module II Second Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

or

RT 9386 – Research Dissertation in Marriage and Family Therapy Module II Second Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

Requirements for a grade of P (Pass):

1.    Complete First Chapter of the research plan which must include:

a.      Introduction

b.      Need for Study

c.      Statement of Problems and Sub-problems

d.      Purpose of Study

e.      Delimitations

f.       Methodology

g.      Definitions of Terms

2.    Organization;

3.    Complete Second Chapter: a Review of Literature;

4.    Complete Third Chapter: the Research Design Proposal, which must include:

a.    Description of the research design

b.    Sources and nature of data

c.    Criteria for the admissibility of data

d.    Identification of appropriate procedures for analysing data.

e.    Method of Collecting Data

f.     Link data and research methodology;

5.    Secure approval from the IRB for the research plan; and

6.    Fulfill additional requirements from the Committee

Requirements for a grade of IP (In-Progress):

IP (In Progress) is not allowed in Second Continuation Module courses.

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of P (Pass):

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of P (Pass) will result in a grade of F (Fail).

 

Module III Second Continuation Course:

RC 9387 – Research Dissertation in Counseling Module III Second Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

or

RS 9357 – Research Dissertation Module III Second Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

or

RT 9387 – Research Dissertation in Marriage and Family Therapy Module III Second Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

Requirements for a grade of P (Pass):

1.    Documented proof of implementation of research as defined in Chapter Three (This would include questionnaires, research data, etc.); and

2.    Additional requirements from the Committee.

Requirements for a grade of IP (In-Progress):

IP (In Progress) is not allowed in Second Continuation Module courses.

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of P (Pass):

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of P (Pass) will result in a grade of F (Fail).

 

Module IV Second Continuation Course:

RC 9388 – Research Dissertation in Counseling Module IV Second Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

or

RS 9358 – Research Dissertation Module IV Second Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

or

RT 9388 – Research Dissertation in Marriage and Family Therapy Module IV Second Continuation (3 Semester Hours)

Requirements for a grade of P (Pass):

1.    Complete Chapter 4 - Reporting of Data;

2.    Complete Chapter 5 - Findings, Analysis, Interpretation, Conclusion and Summary of the Research Dissertation;

3.    Fulfill additional requirements from the Committee;

4.    Successfully defend of the Research Dissertation (Conducted on the main campus);

5.    Submit completed Research Dissertation; and

6.    Secure acceptance of the dissertation by the Head Librarian.

Requirements for a grade of IP (In-Progress):

IP (In Progress) is not allowed in Second Continuation Module courses.

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of P (Pass):

Failure to complete requirements for a grade of P (Pass) will result in a grade of F (Fail).

 

Dissertation Approval Process

Dissertations represent the student, the faculty and the University.  Dissertations are to meet high standards to be approved.  The dissertation approval process involves a series of steps.  The following steps are to be observed.  These procedures are to be presented to the student within the dissertation course syllabi.

1.    The student’s Dissertation Committee members are responsible for assessing the subject content, the research design, the research implementation, the research analysis, and reporting of the results as well as assessing the quality of the written product based on standards of grammar, sentence structure, and the appropriate writing style manual.

2.    Once the student and the Dissertation Committee members are satisfied with the module, the chairperson selects approval on the Dissertation Module Approval Form.  The chairperson forwards the module and the Dissertation Module Approval Form to the dean of the school for review.

3.    The dean of the school is responsible for assessing the quality of the written product based on standards of the school.  Once the dean of the school is satisfied with the quality of the module he selects approval on the Dissertation Module Approval Form and forwards the module and the approval form to the Vice President of Academic Affairs.

4.    The Vice President of Academic Affairs is responsible for assessing the quality of the written product based on standards of the University.  Once the Vice President of Academic Affairs is satisfied with the quality of the module he selects approval on the Dissertation Module Approval Form and:

a.    For Modules I through III, the Vice President of Academic Affairs sends notice to the Business Office that the module is approved.

b.    For Module IV, the Vice President of Academic Affairs sends notice to the Business Office that the module is approved after he receives certification from the Head Librarian that all requirements for submission of the dissertation have been met.

5.    The Business Office then processes payment to the Dissertation Committee members.

 

End of Dissertation Requirements

 

 


 

 

Source Notes

 

 

 

 

 

 



[i] Source:  International Association for Continuing Education and Training (IACET).  2000.  Criteria and Guidelines for Quality Continuing Education and Training Programs:  The CEU and Other Measurement Units.  IACET:  Washington, DC. (Section I).